First Look at Nearby Sharing – Google’s AirDrop Clone for Android – XDA Developers

January 24th, 2020

Photos: GOP Senators play with fidget spinners at impeachment hearings – Business Insider – Business Insider

January 24th, 2020
  • Republican senators whipped out an arsenal of fidget spinners during Thursday’s impeachment hearings.
  • Sens. Richard Burr, Mike Rounds, Tom Cotton, and Pat Toomey were all seen toying with the device, which was originally designed for restless children.
  • It’s a rotating device set on ball bearings, which spins for a long period of time once flicked. They were all the rage in 2017.
  • The source of the toys was Burr, according to NBC, who handed them to colleagues before the second day of Trump’s impeachment inquiry, where opening statements were heard.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories. 

President Donald Trump’s Thursday impeachment hearings took a trip down memory lane to 2017 as multiple restless Republican senators were spotted playing with fidget spinners.

Soon after House impeachment manager Jerry Nadler began his opening statements, Sen. Richard Burr started flicking a blue fidget spinner.

A fidget spinner is a rotating device set on ball bearings, which spins for a long period of time once flicked. It was designed for restless kids, and even adults.

fidget spinner

A green fidget spinner, a tool to help focus the minds of restless children, and adults.
Shutterstock

New York Times reporter Catie Edmonson tweeted this rendering of Burr at the hearing by a Times sketch artist on Thursday. You can see the fidget spinner on his desk.

Sen. Mike Rounds also got in on the action. This image was shared to Twitter by USA Today politics reporter Nicholas Wu on Thursday.

“They do last for quite a while,” Rounds said of the toy, according to Wu. “Not that it might outlast some of the dissertation we have in there, but it might make the time go a little quicker.”

Sens. Tom Cotton and Pat Toomey were seen with fidget spinners on their desks, too. Cotton’s was purple and Toomey’s was white.

Burr had distributed all these spinners on Thursday morning, NBC News reported.

Sen. Richard Burr R-NC., displays a stress ball as he walks to the Senate Chamber prior to the start of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Sen. Richard Burr displays a stress ball as he walks to the Senate Chamber prior Trump’s impeachment trial at the Capitol on January 23, 2020.
Associated Press

Other Republican senators chose to pass the time with other distractions.

Sen. Marsha Blackburn, was spotted reading a book, according to NPR, while NBC News reported that Sen. Rand Paul “appeared to be drawing or tracing a sketch of the US Capitol.”

Trump and many of his allies have dismissed the entire impeachment trial as a hoax.

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Samsung is building its own version of AirDrop called Quick Share – Engadget

January 24th, 2020

Snow chances continue into the afternoon – KCCI Des Moines

January 24th, 2020

Snow chances continue into the afternoon

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WE ARE WATCHING THE ROADS. JASO WE HAVE SEEN THE SNOW INTENSIFY OVERNIGHT. IT HAS BEEN ENOUGH TO COAT ROADWAYS. EVERYTHING HAS A NICE LITTLE COATING ON THEIR. GI YOURSELF SOME TIME THIS MORNING. STILL SNOWING OUT THER 30 DEGREES IS WHAT WE ARE LOOKING AT. ACROSS THE STATE, TEMPERATURES JUST BELOW FREEZING. 30 IN AMES, 31 IN OTTUMWA, THE METRO COMING INTO 30. CHECK OUT TH WIND, GUSTS OF NEARLY 30 MILES PER HOUR IN SOME AREAS. NOT A COMFORTABLE WAY TO START THE DAY. WE HAV SNOW WORKING THROUGH THE SOUTHEASTERN PORTION OF THE STATE AND WE HAVE LIGHTER SNOW THROUGH THE METRO. EVENTUALLY WE WILL SEE THIS TAPER BACK A BIT. FOR THE TIME BEING, STILL ENOUGH TO BE COATING ROADWAYS FOR THE START OF YOUR DAY. METRO UPWARDS TOWARD AMES PICKING UP SOME SNO, AND DOWN TOWARD GREENFIELD. IF YOU ARE TO TH NORTHWEST, YOU ARE LARGELY JUST SEEING CLOUD COVER UP THERE. A PRETTY QUIET AND COMFORTABLE MORNING. DREYER SKIES TO OUR WEST. THIS WHOLE SYSTE EVENTUALLY WILL SHIFT ITS WAY TO THE EAST. IF YOU HAVE TRAV PLANS TAKING YOU OUT TOWARD CHICAGO, YOU WILL WANT TO CHECK RO CONDITIONS BECAUSE ROADS WILL LIKELY BE SLICK. TH SYSTEM WILL LEAVE AND THEN WE HAVE A WEAK ONE TO THE NORTH THAT COULD BRING IN AN ISOLATED SHOWER. NOT BAD TEMPERATURE-WISE TODAY. MINNEAPOLIS AT 33. YOUR 12 HOUR FORECAST. THE BULK OF TH SNOW WE WILL SEE IS BEFORE NOON. AFTER THAT, THINGS TAPER BACK CONSIDERABLY. THIS WHOLE THING WILL SHIFT OUT OF HERE IN THE EVENING. TEMPERATURES TOPPING OUT IN THE 30’S. EARLY ON, THE SNOW WILL CONTINUE. AROUND P.M., IT WILL LEAVE. IT WILL BE ENOUGH TO MAKE ROADS SLICK. WE ARE NOT TALKING ABOUT A BIG BURST OF SNOW. 1.6 INCHES OF SNOW TAKES THE CA IN OTTUMWA. TEMPERATURES OVER THE NEXT EIGHT

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Snow chances continue into the afternoon

The latest KCCI weather forecast.

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Explosion at Houston building shakes city, scatters debris – CTV News

January 24th, 2020

HOUSTON — A large explosion at an apparent industrial building in Houston early Friday left rubble scattered in the area, damaged homes and was felt for kilometres away.

One person was taken to a hospital because of the blast, the Houston Fire Department said. A fire continued to burn at the site hours after the explosion and people were told to avoid the area.

The explosion, which appeared to be centred on an industrial building, shook other buildings about 4:30 a.m., with reports on Twitter of a boom felt across the city.

Houston police tweeted that officers were blocking off streets in the area. Police said people should avoid the area, but no evacuation has been ordered. Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said first responders were checking on residents of nearby homes.

Several people told Houston TV station KHOU that the explosion was so loud, they thought a bomb had gone off or that a vehicle had crashed into their homes. At one man’s home about 1/4 mile (0.4 kilometres) away, glass doors were shattered, ceilings were cracked, and the lid of his toilet was even torn off, the station reported.

Southeast Texas has seen a series of explosions in recent years up and down the Texas Gulf Coast, which is home to the highest concentration of oil refineries in the nation. Last July, an explosion at an ExxonMobil refinery in Baytown left more than dozen people with minor injuries and put nearby residents under a shelter-in-place advisory for three hours.

In December, two blasts in the coastal city of Port Neches shattered windows and ripped the doors from nearby homes.

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How much longer will we trust Google’s search results? – The Verge

January 24th, 2020

The Most Downloaded Switch Games In Japan Last Year – Kotaku

January 24th, 2020

Chinese coronavirus prompts lockdown unlike anything seen before – The Globe and Mail

January 24th, 2020

A worker gestures at a construction site of a hospital to treat patients during a virus outbreak in Wuhan, January 24, 2020. China is rushing to build a new hospital at the epicentre of a deadly virus outbreak that has stricken hundreds of people.

STR/AFP/Getty Images

In the midst of a lockdown unlike any the world has seen before, some 35 million people in China spent the year’s most important holiday in a state of confusion, dread and anger at a late but heavy-handed government action to curb the spread of a SARS-like virus that has already reached to the distant corners of the country.

Further fears arose when authorities disclosed the death of a 36-year-old man in Wuhan, the city of 11 million that is the epicentre of the new coronavirus — and two deaths far from the city, in Hebei and Heilongjiang, a province that borders Russia.

Until now, only older people have died from the fast-spreading 2019-nCoV virus, which by early Friday evening had killed 26 in China and infected 886, including high-speed rail workers in Tianjin, 1,000 kilometres from Wuhan. It is killing 14 per cent of those hospitalized, according to new research published by the University of Hong Kong, and has reached a growing number of other countries, including newly-confirmed cases in Vietnam and Singapore.

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But much remained unknown about the virus, including who is most at risk — or why, exactly, Chinese authorities have now locked down Wuhan and numerous surrounding cities. Transportation has now been restricted in 14 cities and public spaces like theatres and cafes closed in some areas. Flights and trains have been cancelled, commercial vehicles barred from entering Wuhan, highways and tunnels closed and ride-hailing services curbed across the broader region surrounding Wuhan as cities tightened controls to keep people from moving in and out of a huge area at the heart of the viral spread. In Beijing, Shanghai and other major cities, health authorities raised their emergency preparedness alert to its top level. Authorities ordered airlines and train services to provide ticket cancellations without penalties.

Officials shut down large Lunar New Year gatherings in Beijing, closed the Forbidden City, barred access to parts of the Great Wall and, Bloomberg reported, ordered a halt to all sales in China of domestic and international tours. Shanghai Disney closes its gates and cinemas closed their doors during what China calls the Spring Festival season.

The lockdowns, infectious diseases experts said, constitute an unprecedented response to isolate a large population, but one that only served to raise the anxiety among local residents about the trustworthiness of information provided by Chinese authorities, who have begun a more rigorous clampdown on unauthorized information after a few days in which censors exercised a comparatively light touch.

“I am absolutely scared. This is a question of our lives,” said Huang Zhengjun, 27, a hotel worker in Ezhou, one of the cities around Wuhan where roads and transportation services were, with little notice, shut down. “It’s not fair,” he said. “Locking people up before the city is prepared, and before people have a chance to react, isn’t fair anywhere.”

He also suspected that authorities knew more than they were letting on. Why had Ezhou, which is 70 kilometres southeast of Wuhan, been locked down when there were no official reports of people infected there? There must be “many buried cases,” Mr. Huang said. He was aware that authorities had arrested people for spreading rumours when they posted information about the virus, which began to draw attention in mid-December, before its seriousness was formally acknowledged. “As an ordinary resident here, I have to say that I don’t think the government has fulfilled its responsibilities on this matter.”

Even on Friday, “we can only get updates from WeChat and social media, half-believing and half-doubting what information we have. It feels terrible,” Mr. Huang said. Videos circulating on social media channels showed scenes of desperation and fear among medical workers and local residents alike. But because officials had provided assurances until this week that the problem was not serious, Mr. Huang said, “we missed the best point in time to take preventative measures. Now we know how it tastes when everything is covered up.”

Meanwhile, people in China took to social media with detailed stories about loved ones refused treatment or diagnosis by overwhelmed hospitals, raising questions not only about the effectiveness of the Chinese health care response but also about the accuracy of statistics on the numbers of affected people. China’s State Council, the country’s national Cabinet, on Friday pledged serious consequences for concealment or under-reporting about the epidemic.

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Construction has already begun on a thousand-bed medical facility that, authorities said, would use prefabricated components to allow its completion within a week. Journalists in Wuhan posted images of long queues at hospitals and patients attached to intravenous drips on the streets, an indication of an overwhelmed health care system.

Two lawyers who spoke to The Globe and Mail said they had received copies of a notice from Shandong province describing a need to “strengthen the positive guidance of lawyers in the region and ensure that lawyers do not take the opportunity to speculate and do not have a negative impact on the overall situation.” The notice urged the deletion of negative remarks and promised to deal seriously with lawyers who made improper remarks.

Some virologists have questioned the value of the lockdown, which was imposed long after many had left Wuhan for hometowns around the country. Only two Chinese provinces and regions remain formally unaffected: Qinghai and Tibet.

The last major quarantine of an entire urban area took place “in Sierra Leone surrounding the 2014 Ebola epidemic,” said Raina MacIntyre, a doctor and epidemiologist who leads the biosecurity research program at the University of New South Wales. What China is doing is “unprecedented,” she said. “We haven’t seen a lockdown at this level before.”

But it’s a measure that could help prevent a Chinese health crisis from becoming a global one, she said. The World Health Organization has held back from declaring the Wuhan virus an international emergency, with spokesman Tarik Jasarevic saying Friday, “It’s still too early to draw conclusions on how severe the virus is.”

By halting air travel from the region, “it will instantly reduce the risk of cases ending up in other countries,” Dr. MacIntyre said. “Perhaps while there’s so much uncertainty about what’s the source of this infection, what’s the exact mode of transmission — we need to know those things to control the disease — then it’s probably a good strategy.”

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Early data show a fatality rate of 14 per cent among those hospitalized for the Wuhan virus, a study published by University of Hong Kong researchers. That compares to roughly 12 per cent of all cases in SARS, and 24 per cent for the subsequent Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERCS), also a coronavirus.

Those figures show that the Wuhan virus does not appear to be as serious as SARS or MERS, since hospitalized cases tend to be the most serious, Dr. MacIntyre said. But the Wuhan virus remains “a serious infection.”

She also raised questions about the information coming from Chinese authorities. “Was there really an increase from 40 to 800 cases in a period of two weeks?” she said. “It’s really hard to say whether the cases just weren’t reported, or whether they just began testing more actively.”

Such questions, however, did little to ease the restrictions on life for those inside the lockdown zone. Liu Nan, 24, lives in Tuanfeng County, a small district in Huanggang City. Officials cut off roads in the area at 10 a.m. Friday, she said, and “we can’t go anywhere now.”

There, too, there were no officially reported cases. “The problem is we have a right to be informed about the real situation,” Ms. Liu said. “The fact that our county is blocked suggests that there are cases of infection, but the government has not disclosed anything. This is making people more nervous and more scared.”

There was, too, a sense of bleakness over a festive season poisoned. Mr. Huang had abandoned plans to return to his hometown, and most of his friends were refusing to go out.

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It’s “a nightmare,” he said.

“This was supposed to be one of the happiest festivals for Chinese people. But it has turned out to be so miserable.”

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Deborah Dugan Tried To Fix The Grammys. Instead She Says She Was ‘Ruined’ By A Boys’ Club. – HuffPost

January 24th, 2020

From the outside, it looks like the Grammys have come a long way from 2017, when the award show was widely criticized for being dominated by men. 

Powerhouse artists like Lizzo, Billie Eilish and Ariana Grande are set to perform Sunday night at the music awards, hosted by Alicia Keys. Women make up the majority of nominees in the four biggest categories, including Song of the Year and Best New Artist. 

Five of the eight nominees for Album of the Year are women. That’s a big turnaround from the past: From 2013 to 2018, a staggering 91% of Grammy nominees were men. 

Former Grammy chief Deborah Dugan, who filed a lawsuit against the Recording Academy, is interviewed Thursday on "Good Mornin



RW/MediaPunch/IPx

Former Grammy chief Deborah Dugan, who filed a lawsuit against the Recording Academy, is interviewed Thursday on “Good Morning America.”

Behind the scenes, however, the game is still rigged in favor of the powerful and well-compensated men who actually run the show, according to explosive allegations from Deborah Dugan. She was put on leave last week from her role as CEO of the Recording Academy, the nonprofit in charge of the Grammys, a little more than a week before the award show.

Dugan was the organization’s first female leader. She told HuffPost that she was forced out by the academy’s male board members and powerful lawyers after trying to make significant changes at the academy and speaking up about sexual harassment at the organization.  

“I knew it was going to be an old boys’ club, deeply entrenched and not diverse institution,” Dugan said Thursday. “I had no idea how bad it would be.” 

U2 singer Bono with Deborah Dugan, when she was CEO of his (Red) charity, in New York City on June 2, 2012, in New York.&nbsp



STAN HOND/AFP via Getty Images

U2 singer Bono with Deborah Dugan, when she was CEO of his (Red) charity, in New York City on June 2, 2012, in New York. 

Dugan, 61, filed a bombshell 44-page sexual harassment complaint Tuesday against the academy with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which handles discrimination complaints. 

In it, Dugan said she faced sustained, persistent sexual harassment from the group’s lead lawyer, Joel Katz, a partner at the influential law firm Greenberg Traurig. She claims he tried to kiss her at their first meeting, a dinner, that took place before she officially started her job. 

“She was very weirded out,” a colleague of Dugan’s at the Recording Academy told HuffPost. Dugan confided in the colleague about the dinner soon after it happened, the person said, requesting that their name not be used for fear of retaliation. 

Katz did not respond to a request for comment from HuffPost, but has denied her characterization of the dinner through a lawyer to other media outlets.

Dugan also claimed that the nonprofit vastly overpays its powerful outside attorneys, including the well-connected Katz, and that the process for nominating artists for the Grammys is flawed. 

The Recording Academy tells a different story, and that story has shifted over the past week.

When Dugan was first placed on leave, the academy put out a statement claiming it was investigating complaints about Dugan’s treatment of a female member of the academy.

That complaint, a 1½-page document sent by a former executive assistant at the academy and reviewed by HuffPost, accuses Dugan of “bullying” and “hostility.” It contains no specific details of the behavior.

Yet that was apparently enough to spur the academy to action. “In light of concerns raised to the Recording Academy Board of Trustees, including a formal allegation of misconduct by a senior female member of the Recording Academy team, the Board has placed Recording Academy president and CEO Deborah Dugan on administrative leave, effective immediately,” the academy said in a statement last week. “The Board has also retained two independent third-party investigators to conduct independent investigations of the allegations.” 

The misconduct complaint occurred in December, weeks before she was put on leave.

This week, the academy seemed to change the timeline, claiming that Dugan was put on leave only after her lawyers asked for several million dollars in order to be let out of her contract.

“Following that communication from Ms. Dugan’s attorney, Ms. Dugan was placed on administrative leave as we complete both of these ongoing investigations,” interim CEO Harvey Mason Jr. said in a statement Monday about the ongoing dust-up.

“As GRAMMY week is upon us, I truly hope we can focus our attention on the artists who’ve received nominations and deserve to be celebrated at this time of the year, and not give credence to unsubstantiated attacks on the Academy,” he said in the statement.

HuffPost obtained the misconduct complaint filed by Claudine Little, the former assistant to Portnow who had been at the academy for 20 years. The letter, written by an outside law firm, is addressed to Katz and threatens a lawsuit. 

“Ms. Dugan has exhibited open hostility toward Ms. Little ― perhaps because, according to Ms. Dugan, Ms. Little is not ‘young’ and ‘cool.’” It says Dugan “belittled” and “demeaned” her but doesn’t provide examples.

Little claims in the letter that Dugan was trying to replace her as retaliation for her report of abusive behavior. But Dugan’s former colleague told HuffPost that the plan was always to shift Little to another role.

It’s unusual that a CEO would be put on leave based on such a thin complaint, and it’s equally strange that an investigation like this would take so long, said Dugan’s former colleague.

“This is all a sham,” they said. “Have you ever heard of a serious investigation of a former executive who has walked off the job because she can’t get along with the new CEO of the company?”

Little told Rolling Stone, “Ms. Dugan’s choice to litigate in the press and spread a false narrative about the Academy and me and my colleagues is regrettable, but it is also emblematic of Ms. Dugan’s abusive and bullying conduct while she served as the Academy’s President and CEO.” 

The fact that the academy’s story has changed is telling, said Michael Willemin, a partner at Wigdor, the New York law firm representing Dugan. “Anytime a company starts changing the reasons it presents for taking an adverse action, it raises the specter that the reasons are false.”

Made To Feel Like A ‘Whore’

None of this was how it was supposed to go. Dugan stepped into her role just six months ago as part of the academy’s efforts to do better with women after a disastrous 2018 award show that left the hashtag GrammySoMale trending. 

Her predecessor, Neil Portnow, was forced to step down last year after saying that if women wanted to get more acclaim, they needed to “step up.” (Worth noting: Portnow’s predecessor, Mike Greene, was ousted in 2002 in the wake of a sexual harassment scandal and amid accusations of financial wrongdoing.)

The outrage over Portnow’s comments, coming at the height of the Me Too movement, was intense. Entertainers including Pink, Sheryl Crow and Katy Perry, as well as powerful female industry executives, called for his resignation.  

The Recording Academy then brought in Tina Tchen, who would later go on to become the president of TimesUp, to lead a task force aimed at improving things.

An investigation from Tchen’s task force found the Recording Academy to be overwhelmingly dominated by men ― men made up close to 75% of the nominating committees, according to the report. The academy seemed to take the findings seriously, increasing the number of nominees in its four biggest categories to eight from four, and diversifying its voting body by adding more women, people of color and younger members.

The Recording Academy hired Dugan in August 2019 with a mandate to work on improving diversity and inclusion. She was an industry pro who was the CEO of (Red), the nonprofit group founded by Bono, and prior to that an executive at EMI and Disney, and wanted to make more changes, particularly at the board level, to add diversity. 

That’s not how it worked out.

Dugan said her first clue came soon after she signed a three-year contract to lead the Recording Academy, at a dinner with Katz.

The general counsel propositioned her, she says in her complaint, called her “baby” and told her about his private plane and his money. At the end of their meeting, at which Dugan said she just tried to keep things professional, he tried to kiss her. Every time the two met one-on-one after that incident, Katz would tell Dugan she was pretty and referred to her as baby, according to her complaint.

Dugan told HuffPost that she’d been made to feel like a “whore” at that first meeting with Katz. She emphasized that she thought the point wasn’t romantic but a test to see what she’d put up with.

Through a lawyer, Katz denied Dugan’s recollection of the dinner, The New York Times reported. He did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s request for comment Thursday.

Then, More Trouble

The next sign of trouble for Dugan came at her very first board meeting ― before she’d officially started her job. Dugan said she was whisked into a private room and told that Portnow, who was still CEO, was facing a rape allegation from a female artist. The day before, Dugan had been asked to sign off on Portnow’s bonus. And a little before that, she’d also been asked to approve a deal in which he would stay on as a consultant for the academy for $750,000 a year. She told HuffPost she rejected the consultation deal because she didn’t “want him giving the impression that the female CEO can’t do it alone.”

Portnow has called the rape claims “ludicrous and untrue” and has said he didn’t demand the $750,000 fee.

A representative of the academy confirmed to HuffPost that there was indeed a rape allegation but that Portnow was cleared.

“Ms. Dugan was made aware of previous rape allegations, for which Mr. Portnow was cleared, and she did not do anything with the information,” said the representative, who declined to be named.

Was Portnow put on leave while he was accused of rape? The representative of the academy did not know.

It was becoming clear to Dugan that there were deep problems at the academy, but she said she was already locked into the job. She had signed a contract. And, word of her hiring had leaked out quickly. She also had moved her teenage daughter and 91-year-old mother from New York to Los Angeles.

Plus, Dugan thought she could fix the organization.

“I don’t know if I am nuts, but I thought I was the person that was going to get in and bring forth positive change,” she said.

Dugan alleges in her complaint that the academy is supporting a boys’ club of powerful men by paying out millions in fees to lawyers from outside firms for relatively small and uncomplicated legal work rather than using its own staff attorneys.

I don’t know if I am nuts, but I thought I was the person that was going to get in and bring forth positive change.
Deborah Dugan

Dugan wanted to hire in-house lawyers, but the board rejected her bid to do so. 

Katz, for example, is paid $250,000 a year simply to be on call for the academy, according to the complaint ― he then earns fees on top of that for any work performed and is paid a salary by his firm. Katz’s firm, Greenberg Traurig, is a dominant player in the recording industry ― and indeed the academy has paid out $10.3 million in fees to the firm in the past four years, The New York Times reported.

Dugan also alleges that she was paid far less than her two male predecessors and that, when she raised the issue,she was told she should be happy to be earning more than she had in her previous role,” according to the complaint. Dugan does not reveal those compensation numbers in the complaint. However, she earned $537,000 a year at (Red), The Associated Press reported. In 2016, Portnow made $1.7 million. He had been CEO since 2002.

A few artists have spoken up on Dugan’s behalf.

“I salute Deborah Dugan for her truth and courage to try and effect change. As always, a bunch of ignorant, testosterone-fueled, usually old white men stop progress and screw it up,” said hip-hop icon Chuck D. in an Instagram post after Dugan was put on leave. “Same old bullshit.”

Dugan never wanted to go public with these claims, she said. She had hoped to reform the academy from the inside. But that all changed in November, when the board got wind that Portnow’s former executive assistant Little had taken a leave of absence and accused Dugan of bullying her. Little sent her formal legal letter on Dec. 17.

The board used that complaint to strip Dugan of some of her powers. In early December, they told her that she could no longer hire or fire people without board approval, she said in her complaint.

Dugan ― powers shackled ― wanted to at least put her experiences somewhere on the record, hoping to prod the board into action.

On Dec. 22, she sent a letter to the academy’s human resources representative outlining these complaints ― about pay, lawyer fees and Katz’s behavior.

Just three weeks after sending the letter, which is included in her complaint, the academy put Dugan on administrative leave. Dugan said she was assured the matter would be private.

Yet that same day, the Los Angeles Times published a story about how she was put on leave because of misconduct allegations ― and the story quickly spread.

To push Dugan out right before the Grammys looks “clumsy,” said Rosemary Carroll, an industry lawyer and the founding partner of Carroll, Guido, Groffman, Cohen, Bar & Karalian, who’s been working in the music industry for 30 years.

The two weeks before the Grammys is the only time anyone pays attention to the Recording Academy, she said. “To do it in those two weeks, in this clumsy, awkward, obvious way, seemed lame to me.”

Carroll is one of the female executives who called for Portnow’s ouster.

Even though Portnow left and the academy brought in Dugan, it seems it wasn’t serious about making changes, she said.

“They just wanted her to come in like window dressing, it seems.”

My Career Is Ruined

Dugan said the charges are “bogus,” manufactured in order to push her out. 

“There is a pattern of sexism and corruption in the Recording Academy,” Dugan said. “There is no pattern in my 40 years of anyone going to HR complaining about me.”

Dugan said her career is essentially “ruined,” and she now assumes she’ll never work again. 

She won’t be going to the Grammys on Sunday night. She said the academy yanked her tickets ― and the tickets of all the industry contacts and friends she had invited.

Still, she’ll watch the show on TV. “I worked really hard on this show, and it’s going to be great.”

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Poco F1 successor confirmed to launch in February – Android Authority

January 24th, 2020