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Fortnite World Cup champ gets ‘swatted’ during live Twitch stream – New York Post

August 12th, 2019

Facebook is working on a dark mode for its Android app – Android Police

August 12th, 2019

‘Legion’s Noah Hawley Talks Tonight’s Series Finale, ‘Fargo’, ‘Doctor Doom’ Movie & ‘Cat’s Cradle’ Adaptation – Deadline

August 12th, 2019

SPOILER ALERT: This article contains details of tonight’s Legion series finale on FX.

After three mind-bending and time-traveling seasons, Legion came to an end tonight by going full circle, including on the soundtrack with The Who’s “Happy Jack.”

A baby, a showdown with the parasitic Farouk (Navid Negahban), a new beginning and future X-Men boss Charles Xavier (Harry Lloyd) empathically telling his powerful telepathic son David Heller/Legion (Dan Stevens) that he was “trapped in a war you didn’t start.” Did Daddy make it all better in the end of the series finale co-directed and co-penned by Hawley? Could anyone make it all better for the perpetual battle zone that was David’s psyche?

Well, Legion being Legion, yes and no, as the self-described “twisted rainbow” and exquisitely crafted series co-starring Rachel Keller, Jean Smart, Aubrey Plaza Jermaine Clement, Stephanie Corneliussen and Lauren Tsai made clear tonight in the 27th and final episode. Which, ending where it all started, makes one wonder if there is more to come or another place for the mutant character played by the Downton Abbey alum in the greater Marvel Universe now that FX is owned by Disney?

With his feature directorial debut Lucy in the Sky starring Stevens and Natalie Portman set for release this fall and the Chris Rock-led fourth season of Fargo about to head into high gear, Hawley chatted with me recently about the satisfaction of Legion’s end and whether there would be more. The Before the Fall author also delved into the FX series based on the Coen brothers’ 1996 movie, whether his Doctor Doom flick is a go and the status of the Kurt Vonnegut adaption Cat’s Cradle as a limited series for the John Landgraf-run cabler.

DEADLINE: You once said that “endings give stories meaning,” so does this series finale have the meaning you sought?

HAWLEY: I mean I just sort of followed the story where it went is the laziest answer but also, on some level, the truest answer.

I allowed the genre to inspire me with this understanding that once we brought time into the story — which we really did last year — with the sort of future storyline it introduced past, present, and future in a way that became a bit more malleable. Then we introduced the Switch character in Season 3 and this desire to go back for David, which was very primal for him. He always had this feeling that his life had been ruined when he was a baby and that if he’s ever going to have another chance he has to solve that original problem. All that just put us in a position where what would happen if he did that and how would he do that and can he do that and not be a villain? Can he redeem himself while doing that?

So, I think I always knew what the three acts of the story were, but the literal idea that the series is a loop came in the writing sort of the last act of this season.

DEADLINE: A last act literally that ends where it all began with The Who’s “Happy Jack,” a true loop and a second chance, or is that open-ended?

HAWLEY: It’s complete in that it’s all starting all over again, so who knows what will happen the second time around. Maybe if you watch it a second time, something completely different will happen. I mean I feel complete with it. I think that I was able to, in an elegant way, tell a very expansive and kind of experimental story that still managed to resolve itself in a human and dramatic way.

DEADLINE: How so?

HAWLEY: So that the ride that you went on isn’t the roller coaster where it’s just, “I can’t believe the characters did that,” it’s also, “I can’t believe the show just did that.” In the end, it still resolved the way a good drama should resolve, which is in a satisfying, inspiring, cathartic manner.

DEADLINE: Time travel and the resolution, as well as the destruction that it can bring, is nothing new to the Marvel universe, but were you concerned that it slipped too close to the tropes of Avengers: Endgame?

HAWLEY: To be honest, I didn’t see Endgame until after I finished Legion. Then I was like, “Oh, time travel. There you go.”

I will say, by the time I finished watching that movie, I thought they did something different than we did. I think that it’s hard on some level to just swing a stick and not hit a show or a movie of the genre that hasn’t played with time on some level.

What was most satisfying to me was to do things in our fourth hour this season which Daniel Kwan directed where we introduced the Time Eaters and you’re watching the show and suddenly The Shield’s Vic Mackey walks in the room. Good cop and bad cop are gone for the day. Your brain breaks a little and asks, “What is happening right now?”

The show was 15 years ago and what’s happened is that I wanted you the audience to experience time travel — it’s not just the characters within the show. Those kinds of ideas are what really kind of got me out of bed in the morning — to say, “How do we make the audience have a subjective experience that the characters are having?”

DEADLINE: You constantly played with perspective and expectations with the twisted rainbow, but one thing, among many, that struck me in the finale was when Harry Lloyd’s Charles Xavier says, “No more travel, no more bloodshed. I’ve always wanted to be a teacher.” It feels like you guys were reaching right out to the Marvel universe and then just putting your hand on it, like a palm on a cheek. There has been so much speculation through the three seasons of Legion about how that would work. How did that work for you as a creator?

HAWLEY: In thinking about bringing Charles into it and how to use him, obviously there was a lot of conversation about, “Which version is it?” Is it the sort of younger James McAvoy version, or is it the older Patrick Stewart version? It didn’t seem consistent with any timeline to have the older version. So, then the question became, “Well, all right, so if he’s a young man, then how young is he? And where is he in the large story?” I just thought that the most sort of emotional version was the young father who made mistakes because he didn’t know. Then he meets adult David and he goes, “You’re a baby,” I thought I would have time to figure all this stuff out. That idea that he had come from the war and that he’d met his wife in a mental institution the same way that his son had met his.

Those echoes were really interesting to me — and the fact that you’re dealing with a David and a Charles who are basically the same age and one of them has to become a father in a way that he didn’t expect. But the reality is the moment you have that baby, you have to become that father.

DEADLINE: As a parent to this show, do you think there could be more Legion? I remember in February that Marvel TV boss Jeph Loeb referred to this iteration as kind of a graphic novel, and now this graphic novel is over, but there could be another graphic novel — do you have more Legion to tell?

HAWLEY: I think I did the sort of difficult egg carry to get the story and these characters through all the challenges that they had. And left them all in a sort of resolved and safe place in a way that feels satisfying to me.

I don’t, at this moment, have as much thought in my head about returning to Legion or rebooting it or any of those things. You know, obviously the Marvel universe is huge and expansive, and this character is out there now. You could do a lot worse than to incorporate Dan Stevens into the X-Men, in my opinion. But it’s not a conversation I’ve had. My head is on now in the film and in Fargo.

DEADLINE: That’s some headspace I want to get into. But before that, how was that twisting journey that you and Dan took together to you in hindsight now that Legion is over?

HAWLEY: The thing with Dan is he’s just such a grounded actor and performer. He’s so nuanced that I didn’t go out of my way to challenge him with the whimsical nature of the storytelling. He certainly learned to play the banjo and sing “Rainbow Connection,” while also signaling that something terrible is happening. Those kinds of challenges I don’t think you would have gotten from any other story.

You know, I think what was very satisfying for him was that even though the show was very playful, his journey was never a joke. He was always in a position where his dramatic motivations were grounded and real and so you could ask him to use his powers, but it was always grounded in a real emotional motivation.

DEADLINE: Now, in other motivation, where are things at with Fargo 4?

HAWLEY: We’re in the writing phase, we’ve basically completed the casting phase, and we’ll start shooting in October to premiere in the spring.

DEADLINE: Tight, coming off Legion and with Lucy in the Sky coming out in October…

HAWLEY: (laughs) We’re filming in Chicago and next week I think the production offices open in Chicago, and I decided to go ahead and release a movie right when I’m prepping to direct the first hour of Fargo. So I suppose one could say I like multi-tasking, although I would argue with you.

DEADLINE: I would use the term “daunting” …

HAWLEY: Yes, but I mean Fargo is such an extraordinary state of mind to tell a story in. That kind of combination of tragedy and comedy makes it really thrilling to go back into that mindset.

DEADLINE: And after Fargo, is Cat’s Cradle still next on the dance card?

HAWLEY: It is, yeah. It’s sort of on the docket behind Fargo, and I’ve written the first hour and have a sort of overview sense of the way that it will lay out. It’s not at the front of my head right now, but I remain really excited about it and committed to the Vonnegut adventure that I’m going to go on.

DEADLINE: Is this still something you’re looking at filming next year, or has that been pushed back?

HAWLEY: Yeah. I think so. I think next year is still the plan.

DEADLINE: Being that we are in front of a Marvel backdrop with Legion, where is the Doctor Doom movie at? You’ve spoken before about having a script ready but that ownership changes have put maybe a little pin in it for a while. Where does it stand in your perspective now with Disney taking control of the Fox assets formally this past spring?

HAWLEY: I mean, where it stands is now that the movie is done and Legion is done and I’ve taken a little time off because someone told me there was this word “vacation,” which means you don’t work, which sounded really interesting to me. But you know, I need to circle back to them and announce that I would love to make it and figure out if that’s something that is possible. Whether or not they already have a plan in place for what to do with those characters or whether they’re open to my kind of vision for what to do with those characters. But it’s sort of on me right now to go push them, which I will do as soon as I come up for air.

DEADLINE: That’s a very unique, to put it politely, notion of a vacation …

HAWLEY: I have no shortage of challenges, obviously. You know, the Fargo story feels very important to me right now. There’s another book that I’m working on that I’m excited about, and I’m trying to figure out what the next film will be. I’m a lucky guy to have that much opportunity presented to me.

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Brother learns teenage serial killers who murdered Chynna Deese and Lucas Fowler committed suicide – Daily Mail

August 12th, 2019

The brother of an American tourist who was murdered alongside her Australian boyfriend says he still has no idea why the pair were targeted.

Stetson Deese told the Today show in Australia his sister Chynna and her partner Lucas Fowler’s deaths were so difficult to comprehend because they had done nothing wrong. 

‘It’s kind of hard to digest what happened to such nice people,’ he said. 

‘We do not know why and more and more may be discovered but I don’t think we’re ever going to truly know why. It’s discomforting because anybody, even some of the worst people in the world, if they met Chynna, the last thing they would want to do was kill her.

‘It’s hard to accept such good people can just be killed.’ 

Chynna Deese's brother Stetson (right) said he was struggling to digest the magnitude of what had happened to his sister (left)

Chynna Deese's brother Stetson (right) said he was struggling to digest the magnitude of what had happened to his sister (left)

Chynna Deese’s brother Stetson (right) said he was struggling to digest the magnitude of what had happened to his sister (left)

Autopsies have revealed that teenage murder suspects Kam McLeod (left) and Bryer Schmegelsky (right) died by suicide after leading authorities on a 15-day manhunt in Canada

Autopsies have revealed that teenage murder suspects Kam McLeod (left) and Bryer Schmegelsky (right) died by suicide after leading authorities on a 15-day manhunt in Canada

Autopsies have revealed that teenage murder suspects Kam McLeod (left) and Bryer Schmegelsky (right) died by suicide after leading authorities on a 15-day manhunt in Canada

Schmegelsky and McLeod are accused of killing American backpacker Chynna Deese (left) and her Australian boyfriend Lucas Fowler (right), who were found dead on July 15

Schmegelsky and McLeod are accused of killing American backpacker Chynna Deese (left) and her Australian boyfriend Lucas Fowler (right), who were found dead on July 15

Schmegelsky and McLeod are accused of killing American backpacker Chynna Deese (left) and her Australian boyfriend Lucas Fowler (right), who were found dead on July 15

Ms Deese's family (Chynna pictured second from left with her siblings) have publicly mourned their loss, telling media of Chynna's kindness and open mind, and grieving the bright future she was headed for

Ms Deese's family (Chynna pictured second from left with her siblings) have publicly mourned their loss, telling media of Chynna's kindness and open mind, and grieving the bright future she was headed for

Ms Deese’s family (Chynna pictured second from left with her siblings) have publicly mourned their loss, telling media of Chynna’s kindness and open mind, and grieving the bright future she was headed for

Canadian authorities confirmed on Monday fugitives Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, and Kam McLeod, 19, had died of suicide by gunfire, following the roadside murders of Mr Fowler, his American girlfriend Chynna, and Vancouver botanist Leonard Dyck. 

The pair, who police spent 15 days hunting, were found with firearms nearby. The guns are now being forensically tested to see if they were used in the murders.

Mr Deese told the breakfast show he would remember his sister as ‘an adventurer’ and ‘a very loving person’.

He said she and Mr Fowler were perfectly matched, and he believed the Sydney man was Chynna’s first real love.

The North Carolina man did not comment on the fact fugitives Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, and Kam McLeod, 19, had taken their own lives, but his sister, Kennedy Deese, said it was disappointing the pair did not face justice.  

The body discovery concluded a 15-day manhunt that began in the western Canadian province of British Columbia and spanned about 3,100 miles across five provinces

The body discovery concluded a 15-day manhunt that began in the western Canadian province of British Columbia and spanned about 3,100 miles across five provinces

The body discovery concluded a 15-day manhunt that began in the western Canadian province of British Columbia and spanned about 3,100 miles across five provinces

Her sister Kennedy (left) said her family (mother pictured right) had forgiven the killers and their families, but said they would never understand how anyone could bring themselves to hurt Chynna or her Australian boyfriend, Lucas Fowler

Her sister Kennedy (left) said her family (mother pictured right) had forgiven the killers and their families, but said they would never understand how anyone could bring themselves to hurt Chynna or her Australian boyfriend, Lucas Fowler

Her sister Kennedy (left) said her family (mother pictured right) had forgiven the killers and their families, but said they would never understand how anyone could bring themselves to hurt Chynna or her Australian boyfriend, Lucas Fowler

 On Saturday, she shared her thoughts with Facebook friends, telling them her family needed to move forward.

She said it ultimately did not matter what happened to the pair, as no amount of explanation could ever make her understand what had happened to Chynna.

‘There is no excuse for staying broken and refusing to heal,’ her post read. 

‘Whether or not these fugitives are captured alive or recovered dead would have made no difference. No amount of confession will validate or solidify an understanding of the events that lead to the unprovoked murder of my sister. 

‘It’s unfortunate the fugitives lives ended on their terms. There was a one in a million chance that such tragedy would befall my family, but Chynna was a once in a lifetime soul.’ 

Ms Deese said Chynna had been building ‘a beautiful life with a future full of love and hope and adventure’ with Mr Fowler, and wanted to start a family some day. 

She told friends while her family was hurt, they forgave the killers and their families. 

SUSPECTED SERIAL KILLERS ON THE RUN IN CANADA: A TIMELINE

July 12: Kam McLeod and Bryer Schmegelsky leave their hometown of Port Alberni, Vancouver Island, to search for work in Whitehorse, Yukon, according to family members

July 15: Police find the bodies of Chynna Deese, a 24-year-old from Charlotte, North Carolina, and Lucas Fowler, a 23-year-old from Sydney, Australia, on the side of Highway 97 about 12 miles south of Liard Hot Springs in remote British Columbia. 

The blue 1986 Chevrolet van they were driving on their road trip through Canada is found nearby with a blown-out back window

July 18: McLeod’s torched Dodge pickup truck is found 300 miles away near Dease Lake 

July 19: The body of Leonard Dyck, a 64-year-old Vancouver botanist, is found about a mile away from the burned-out remains of the truck McLeod and Schmegelsky were traveling in. 

RCMP reports the teens as missing, fearing that they had been killed or kidnapped by whomever committed the murders of Deese, Fowler and Dyck

July 24: Schmegelsky and McLeod are named as suspects in the three murders after the RAV4 was found in flames near Gillam 

July 29: York Landing in Manitoba is thrown into lockdown after two men were spotted foraging for food at local landfill, sparking a massive search by police, military, tracking dogs and drones 

August 1: Police begin searching the province of Ontario, 1,200 miles from where the pair were last seen, after reports of a suspicious vehicle near Kapuskasing

August 2: Police say the sighting of the pair in Ontario was not credible, as Lucas Fowler’s friends and family hold an emotional memorial for him in Sydney.

Local tour guide Clint Sawchuk spots a blue sleeping bag in the Nelson River outside Gillam and contacts police

August 3: Sawchuk’s tip leads police to a battered row boat washed up on the river bank 

August 6: The search diverts to the town of Sundance, which has been abandoned since 1992, and once housed a murder suspect for three years 

August 7: Canadian Police announce that two male bodies believed to belong to McLeod and Schmegelsky were found in ‘dense bush’ by the Nelson River, five miles from where they abandoned the burning car.

August 12: Autopsy confirms the teens died of self-inflicted gunshots  

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Whitney Cummings Just Posted a Nude Photo on Twitter. It Was a Masterful Lesson in Emotional Intelligence – Inc.

August 12th, 2019

When comedian Whitney Cummings faced demands for money over a revealing picture, she simply tweeted the picture herself, taunting her would-be blackmailers. “Here it all is, you foolish dorks!” she wrote. It’s a powerful lesson in emotional intelligence and in how to stand up to online bullies.

The internet in general, and Twitter in particular, is not always a friendly place for high-profile women. Celebrities like Ashley JuddRobin Williams’ daughter Zelda, and even teenage Stranger Things star Millie Bobby Brown have all faced a barrage of hateful attacks on Twitter. The latest victim of social media bullying is comedian and actress Whitney Cummings, creator of the sitcom 2 Broke Girls. Cummings shares the stage with a sex robot modeled after her in a new Netflix special Can I Touch It?

According to Cummings’ tweets, back in April, she accidentally posted a picture of herself to Instagram “that showed nipple.” How do you accidentally post a photo of your own naked breast? From the image, it looks like she was attempting to take a picture of herself in the shower from the shoulders up, but captured a bit more of herself than she intended. It would also seem she didn’t look at the picture before posting it, at least not very hard. However it happened, she says in her tweets that she removed the image from Instagram as soon as she saw the nipple. “The people who took screen grabs are trying to get money from me, some said they have offers to sell them, some are asking for money to not post the photo,” she tweeted.

No dice. “They all must think I’m way more famous than I am, but they also must think I’m way more easily intimidated than I am,” she continued. “If anyone is gonna make money or likes off my nipple, it’s gonna be me. So here it all is, you foolish dorks.” And with that, she tweeted the photo in question.

You can have my nipple, but not my time.

“When a woman in the public eye is extorted, we have to spend time, money and energy dealing with it, hiring lawyers and security experts, and living with a pit in our stomach about when and how we will be humiliated,” she concluded. “Y’all can have my nipple, but not my time or money anymore.”

Did the blackmailers contact her via Twitter? She doesn’t specify, but the fact that she responded on Twitter makes me think maybe they did. She also refused to name names or provide social media handles for the blackmailers, even when asked to by some of her Twitter followers. The reason, she explained, is that “some of them might be dumb kids. I wouldn’t want the stupid ideas I had when I was a teenager to follow me around forever or else every time someone Googled me, they’d see me shoplifting a NO FEAR t-shirt.” 

That was a very thoughtful way to deal with her would-be extortionists, and more consideration than many people might have given them. To me, her reaction strikes a perfect balance–she’s not vindictive, she’s not intimidated, and she doesn’t waste time engaging with the bullies, she simply defuses their threats and moves on. It’s an approach we can all learn from when faced with trolls, threats, or any of the endless rounds of conflict that that roil social media on any given day.

Cummings deserves our thanks for providing a useful lesson for all of us who operate online. Inc.com is a family-friendly website so I haven’t posted her tweets here. You can find them in her Twitter stream, but be warned. Fellow stand-up comedian Bert Kreischer responded to Cummings’ tweets by posting an embarrassing photo of his own, purportedly one of his testicles after a water slide accident. He also tagged it with the trending hashtag #IStandWithWhitney; many people, faced with that photo, tweeted that they wish they hadn’t looked. As always on Twitter, click at your own risk.

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

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Whitney Cummings ‘Extorted’ Over Slipped Nip Photo, She Says – TheWrap

August 12th, 2019

Comedian and writer Whitney Cummings says she is being “extorted” by someone who took screen grabs of a photo she posted (and immediately deleted) on Instagram that accidentally gave a peek at her nipple.

“In April I accidentally posted an insta story that showed nipple,” she said in a Twitter thread Monday. “Once I realized, I deleted. The people who took screen grabs are trying to get money from me, some said they have offers to sell them, some are asking for money to not post the photo.”

Reps for Cummings didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Cummings, who created the CBS sitcom “2 Broke Girls” and was a producer and writer for the “Roseanne” revival, came out verbally swinging at her accused extorters in the series of tweets, making it clear to them she’s not going to buckle.

“They all must think I’m way more famous than I am, but they also must think I’m way more easily intimidated than I am. If anyone is gonna make money or likes off my nipple, it’s gonna be me. So here it all is, you foolish dorks,” she wrote as caption to the nip slip pic.

“When a woman in the public eye is extorted,” she continued, “we have to spend time, money and energy dealing with it, hiring lawyers and security experts, and living with a pit in our stomach about when and how we will be humiliated. Y’all can have my nipple, but not my time or money anymore.”

Cummings said that she won’t post the names of the creep who threatened her, thinking they might just be “dumb kids” with “stupid ideas” that might come back to haunt them later in life. “I wouldn’t want the stupid ideas I had when I was a teenager to follow me around forever,” she joked, “or else every time someone Googled me, they’d see me shoplifting a NO FEAR t-shirt.”

Those on social media reacted swiftly in her support, creating the hashtag #istandwithwhitney, which started to trend. Cummings, of course, reacted with humor. “Nobody is more bummed than me that #istandwithwhitney isn’t about Whitney Houston,” she wrote.

Stand-up special “Whitney Cummings: Can I Touch It?” is streaming now on Netflix.

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Hong Kong airport struggles to reopen after protests – CTV News

August 12th, 2019

The Associated Press
Published Monday, August 12, 2019 1:51AM EDT
Last Updated Monday, August 12, 2019 10:08PM EDT

HONG KONG — One of the world’s busiest airports was struggling to reopen Tuesday, a day after thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators crowded into Hong Kong’s main terminal and forced flight cancellations.

Passengers were checking in for flights with people who were unable to leave on Monday among those crowding the departure hall. About 200 flights had been cancelled.

Protesters have shown no sign of letting up on their campaign to force Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s administration to respond to their demands. No new violence was reported, although the city is on edge after more than two months of near-daily and increasingly bloody confrontations between protesters and police.

Software engineer Joydeep Chakravarti, whose connecting flight to San Francisco was cancelled late Monday, expressed frustration that he was told to leave the airport when he wanted to stay inside the terminal.

“I don’t know what’s out there, so I don’t want to leave. I didn’t make any plans for Hong Kong,” said Chakravarti, who had a carry-on bag with laptop, charger and an extra shirt while the rest of his luggage already was checked in on his Singapore Airlines flight.

A massive traffic jam soon formed on the highway leading back to Hong Kong’s city centre. Some protesters were seen walking toward the airport amid the stifling heat.

The demonstrations that have drawn more than 1 million people at times call for democratic reforms in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory and an independent inquiry into police conduct, with both protesters and police adopting ever-more extreme tactics.

On Monday, the central government in Beijing ominously characterized the protest movement as something approaching “terrorism” that posed an “existential threat” to the population. Beijing tends to define terrorism broadly, including nonviolent movements opposing government policies on the environment or Tibet.

Hong Kong was promised certain democratic rights when China took over the then-British colony in 1997, but in recent years, some have accused Beijing of steadily eroding their freedoms.

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Ex-Twitch executive Justin Wong comments on Ninja vs. Twitch situation – Dot Esports

August 12th, 2019

Canadian military bans sexually explicit, discriminatory tattoos – Global News

August 12th, 2019

Canadian military members are being warned against getting certain tattoos, including those that could be deemed discriminatory or sexually explicit, as the armed forces tries to crack down on misconduct and intolerance in the ranks.

The warning is contained in a new order issued Monday by Gen. Jonathan Vance, Canada’s chief of the defence staff, that provides the most specific guidance yet around what tattoos are considered acceptable – and which ones could result in disciplinary measures.

Story continues below

The directive happens to follow a recent incident in Halifax in which a sailor was criticized for sporting a tattoo featuring the word “infidel”’ in the shape of a rifle. Work on the new rules predated that controversy, said Canadian Armed Forces spokeswoman 2nd Lt. Stephany Duval.

READ MORE: Bystander training to combat sexual harassment, violence becoming more common in workplaces

Following an investigation, the Royal Canadian Navy said there was no ill intent on the sailor’s part but that he had nonetheless agreed to change his tattoo.

The military’s guidelines previously banned tattoos that were “visible either in military uniform or in civilian clothing that could be deemed to be offensive (e.g., pornographic, blasphemous, racist or containing vulgar language or design) or otherwise reflect discredit on the CAF.”

The new rules, which apply whether a tattoo is visible or not, lay out in much more detail what images are forbidden. In his directive, Vance said the aim was to maintain the military’s positive reputation, “which prioritizes the promotion of diversity, respect and inclusion.”

WATCH: Feds reach Canadian Armed Forces sex assault & misconduct settlement reached

Tattoos connected to criminal activities such as criminal gangs are now unacceptable as are those that promote or express discrimination as defined by the Canadian Human Rights Act, including hatred, violence, discrimination or harassment.

Military personnel are also forbidden from sporting ink that they know -“or ought to know” – is racist, sexist, misogynistic, xenophobic, homophobic, discriminatory against the disabled or sexually explicit.

While Duval said the new guidelines were intended to provide more clarity for service members, some have nonetheless expressed confusion and concern on social media over whether they will be forced to change their tattoos.

READ MORE: Feds agree to $900M settlement over military sexual misconduct class action

Much of the discussion centred around whether all tattoos of women such as pictures of pin-up girls, which were often painted on military vehicles during the Second World War and remain popular with many soldiers today, are now completely banned.

Service members who are unsure whether their tattoos pass muster can check with a commanding officer, Duval said. If a design is deemed over the line, they will be required to remove or alter the images – at their own cost – or risk being punished.

The new guidelines comes as senior commanders fight sexual misconduct in the ranks, an effort that has generated mixed results over the past four years – many soldiers, sailors and air force members have continued to report such incidents.

They also follow concerns about some military personnel associating with motorcycle gangs and white-supremacist groups, with military intelligence officials saying in a report last year that 30 were part of a hate group or had made statements that were discriminatory or racist.

WATCH: EXTENDED: Gen. Vance addresses survey on sex assault in the military

The report, obtained by The Canadian Press through the Access to Information Act, also said current and former military members “find that their skills are valued, giving structure to these groups and allowing them to gain positions of leadership.”

“I’d say that’s what it’s really about: a ready way to keep extremists and serious gang members out of the (Canadian Armed Forces),” said Royal Military College professor Christian Leuprecht of the new rules on tattoos.

Defence analyst David Perry of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute said the new rules could nonetheless be difficult to police, given the personal nature of tattoos and their meanings, which aren’t always immediately obvious.

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‘Bachelor in Paradise’: Hannah G. Is the New ‘Player’ of Paradise – Entertainment Tonight

August 12th, 2019

‘Bachelor in Paradise’: Hannah G. Is the New ‘Player’ of Paradise as Blake Drama Intensifies | Entertainment Tonight

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