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Danielle Staub Leaving Real Housewives of New Jersey, Shocks Andy Cohen with Additional Reveal – TooFab

January 8th, 2020

Even though he clearly knew the general nature of Danielle Staub’s announcement on Wednesday night’s “Watch What Happens Live,” she still managed to leave Andy Cohen’s jaw flapping in the wind with the exact wording she chose.

In a nutshell, Danielle announced that her time with “The Real Housewives of New Jersey” is over.

“I have, over the past 12 years and 10 seasons, been a part of this whole franchise and I’ve been very happy to rally and stand on the platform and be here with all of you, but it is time for me to leave and do something that I want to do that makes my heart happy every day,” Danielle told Andy, who looked on with a knowing smile.

But his expression changed dramatically with her next words: “And so, I will be never returning as a “Housewife” again–“

At this point, he couldn’t stop himself, interrupting to repeat, “Never?!”

After a beat, he continued, “Wow, she’s saying the word n– Okay, I didn’t know you were going to say the word never.”

This time, it was Danielle who enjoyed the knowing smile as she continue her thought. “–never returning as a “Housewife” again,” she said, adding, “With the Jersey girls.”

In other words, Danielle is closing the door on her “New Jersey” cast, but isn’t necessarily saying goodbye to the entire franchise. As for what’s next, it looks like Danielle is headed to therapy.

“I am going to start my own cooking channel,” she shared. “Cooking is therapy to me, so I’m basically calling it ‘Cooking Therapy.’ I find my peace in the kitchen.”

Danielle was one of the OG “Jersey” housewives, launching the series with Teresa Giudice, Jacqueline Laurita, Caroline Manzo and Dina Manzo in 2009. She left after two seasons, only to return in time for Season 8 and continue as a “friend” until now.

That said, never say never even though she totally said never. Andy even threw out the idea of Danielle showing up on the “New York” franchise, which is basically right next door. And we think it’s pretty telling that she specified “with the Jersey girls” as a qualifier to her “never.”

Yeah, she’ll be back. In the meantime, we can all look forward to lots of pasta dishes — she promises — as she explores the therapeutic power of cooking.

Got a story or a tip for us? Email TooFab editors at tips@toofab.com.

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Leonardo DiCaprio helps save life of man lost in Caribbean waters: report – Fox News

January 8th, 2020

Leonardo DiCaprio reportedly took time out of his Caribbean vacation last month to help save the life of a man who fell off a boat near St. Barts.

The “Titanic” actor was on a rented boat with his girlfriend and some friends on Dec. 30 when they heard there was a search on for a man who had fallen overboard from a Club Med yacht.

ACTOR DANNY TREJO HELPS RESCUE CHILD FROM OVERTURNED VEHICLE

“Leo and his friends and their boat captain decided to join the search and their efforts resulted in helping save a man’s life,” a source told PEOPLE.

Their boat happened to be the only one searching where the man – who treaded water for 11 hours – had drifted and he was safely found about an hour before nightfall and a rainstorm hit.

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“The boat crew were happy to try and assist — even more so that they were able to help get the man to safety,” the source told PEOPLE.

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R Kelly’s Girlfriends Come to Blows On Video in Vicious Fight – The Blast

January 8th, 2020

During the video, Azriel Clary also warns fans that “Rob has been lying to all of y’all, and has people like me lying for him… that’s why we never watched the documentary.”

A spokesperson for the Chicago Police Department tells The Blast they responded to the condo around 2:10 PM for a call of “battery in progress involving two females.”

We’re told one female was transported to Northwestern Hospital with unknown injuries. Officers are still investigating the active scene.

UPDATE

2:08 PM PT: Chicago PD says Clary told them she was struck in the face by Savage and had to be separated by others at the scene.

Joycelyn Savage “fled” the scene and is currently being classified as the “offender.”

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Lifestyle changes could fight dementia that hits people in their 40s and 50s – STLtoday.com

January 8th, 2020
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Frontotemporal dementia strikes early, typically in the 50s, sometimes as young as age 45. Unlike Alzheimer’s, it doesn’t affect memory, instead attacking the parts of the brain that control thinking, reasoning and emotions.

The first symptom is likely a loss of interest in life and the well-being of others. People might ignore their spouse or children’s feelings, get uncharacteristically frustrated and say or do inappropriate things, such as laugh at a funeral.

Even worse, they’ll likely have no idea they have changed.

“It’s a pretty devastating disease that impacts people in the prime of their lives,” said neurologist Kaitlin Casaletto, an assistant professor in the Memory and Aging Center at the University of California, San Francisco. “It’s especially hard on family members who can see the changes in their loved one they themselves often can’t see.”

Science has struggled to provide interventions to help these patients. Now, a new study published Wednesday suggests that lifestyle changes may help slow the disease progression.

Casaletto and her colleagues followed the activity levels of 105 people with the inherited form of the disease, the first study to do so in this population. They found people who ranked highest in levels of mental and physical activity slowed their functional decline from the disease by half.

“This is an extremely important study providing the strongest evidence yet that lifestyle factors can positively impact brain health, not only for Alzheimer’s disease, but frontotemporal lobar dementia as well,” said neurologist Dr. Richard Isaacson, director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine.

“The study is even more impactful in that patients had a gene that would definitely cause dementia, but they were still able to impact cognitive decline by over 55%,” Isaacson said.

“It was a remarkable effect to see so early on,” Casaletto said. “If this were a drug, we would be giving it to all of our patients.”

A devastating disease

An estimated 50,000 to 60,000 Americans live with FTD or frontotemporal dementia, Casaletto said. About 30% of all cases are inherited. In comparison, only about 1% of Alzheimer’s cases are passed on via a familial gene, she said.

In the most common form of FTD, called “behavioral variant,” the executive (frontal) and emotive (temporal) parts of the brain are affected, thus affecting a person’s ability to control thinking and emotions.

“The connection between the two is critically important,” Casaletto said. “So if you think of the frontal lobe as the start-stop inhibition control center, with the temporal lobe in charge of empathy and anger, you can imagine that when those start to degenerate how wildly unregulated one can become.”

Brain animation

Frontotemporal dementia strikes early, typically in the 50s, sometimes as young as age 45. Unlike Alzheimer’s, it doesn’t affect memory, instead attacking the parts of the brain that control thinking, reasoning and emotions.

In two other variants, the disease attacks areas of the frontal lobe responsible for names of objects and pronouncing words, leading to difficulty with reading, writing and speaking.

As the diseases progress, people have trouble concentrating, planning, making decisions and understanding conversations. They begin overeating, or forget to bathe. They may become compulsive buyers, steal from neighbors or rummage in their garbage, even shoplift at stores. Sometimes, they might begin to walk more slowly, show less muscle strength and have trouble swallowing.

There is no cure, and little science can do. Antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may help with irritability, agitation and apathy. Life span after diagnosis is only six to 10 years.

The role of mental and physical activity

Ongoing research in Alzheimer’s suggests lifestyle factors such as adequate sleep, a healthy diet, and physical and mental exercises can improve brain health. In fact, a recent study on Alzheimer’s found personalized lifestyle interventions not only stopped cognitive decline in people at risk for Alzheimer’s, but actually increased their memory and thinking skills within 18 months.

But no one had ever studied those interventions in frontotemporal dementia.

“There’s incredible variability in FTD, even among people with the same genetic mutations driving their disease. Some people are just more resilient than others for reasons we still don’t understand,” Casaletto said. The study was designed to explore the role of lifestyle in those differences.

People with FTD in the study were mostly asymptomatic or had only mild, early-stage symptoms. Caregivers were asked to rate their loved one’s cognitive and physical activity over several years. The type of physical activity wasn’t critical. It could be walking, jogging, even doing heavy housework or yard chores.

“Studies show even walking is associated with better cognitive outcomes,” Casaletto said. “It seems that every movement counts.”

A cognitively active lifestyle was defined as reading, writing, going to a concert, socializing, doing games, puzzles and hobbies, she said, anything that challenges the brain.

MRIs recorded disease levels in the brain at the start of the study. Participants were given tests of thinking and memory and then rechecked annually. The results at the end of two years were surprising: Despite continued degeneration of brain tissue on scans, the people who scored in the top 25% of either mental or physical activity performed twice as well on cognitive tests as those in the lowest 5% of activity.

“Our results suggest that even people with a genetic predisposition for FTD can still take actions to increase their chances of living a long and productive life,” Casaletto said. “Their fate may not be set in stone.”

The study will continue, and researchers plan to outfit participants with activity trackers to better understand which type of physical activity may be most beneficial. They also plan to tease out other factors that might be involved; at this time, the results are only a correlation.

Despite this study’s limitations, this small but growing pool of research should be a wake-up call to anyone facing a diagnosis of dementia, Isaacson said.

“It is essential for people at risk for dementia and their physicians to change their thinking from, ‘There is nothing we can do,'” Isaacson said. “People at risk should feel empowered and hopeful that they can take some degree of control of their brain health.”

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The best smart home products at CES 2020 – Android Authority

January 8th, 2020

CES 2020 day 4: all the latest news, analysis and exciting new gadgets – TechRadar India

January 8th, 2020

CES 2020 day 3: all the latest news, analysis and cool new gadgets – TechRadar India

January 8th, 2020

45 states nationwide, including New Hampshire reporting widespread flu activity – WMUR Manchester

January 8th, 2020

New Hampshire has reported widespread flu activity. The Centers for Disease Control said the flu has been on the rise nationwide over the past eight weeks and continues to increase. >> Download the FREE WMUR AppThe staff at CMC Urgent Care in Bedford said they have noticed the uptick but are urging people it is not too late to get vaccinated.The flu is now widespread in 45 states across the country, the CDC reported this year’s flu season could be one of the worst in decades.“We’re seeing activity across the state, pretty evenly distributed across the state,” said Joe Mangum, PA-C at CMC Urgent Care. Maps provided by the Department of Health and Human Services showed acute respiratory illness activity, which includes the flu, is high at the Seacoast and elevated in Coos, Grafton, Sullivan and Hillsborough counties. Nationally, at least 29,000 people have died from influenza so far this season.The CDC estimated there have been at least 6.4 million flu illnesses and 55,000 hospitalizations.No deaths have been identified in New Hampshire so far this season, but medical professionals are noticing an increase in cases. “Pretty much daily now, we’re seeing cases of the flu. Mostly we’re seeing flu-B as far as the strain goes, we’re seeing more of that this year,” said Mangum.The director of the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases said the nation is on track for a year as severe as the season in 2017 to 2018, the deadliest in more than four decades.Mangum said symptoms such as abrupt onset of fever, body aches, respiratory symptoms, cough, sore throat, and a runny nose all are signs of the flu.

New Hampshire has reported widespread flu activity. The Centers for Disease Control said the flu has been on the rise nationwide over the past eight weeks and continues to increase.

>> Download the FREE WMUR App

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The staff at CMC Urgent Care in Bedford said they have noticed the uptick but are urging people it is not too late to get vaccinated.

The flu is now widespread in 45 states across the country, the CDC reported this year’s flu season could be one of the worst in decades.

“We’re seeing activity across the state, pretty evenly distributed across the state,” said Joe Mangum, PA-C at CMC Urgent Care.

Maps provided by the Department of Health and Human Services showed acute respiratory illness activity, which includes the flu, is high at the Seacoast and elevated in Coos, Grafton, Sullivan and Hillsborough counties.

Nationally, at least 29,000 people have died from influenza so far this season.

The CDC estimated there have been at least 6.4 million flu illnesses and 55,000 hospitalizations.

No deaths have been identified in New Hampshire so far this season, but medical professionals are noticing an increase in cases.

“Pretty much daily now, we’re seeing cases of the flu. Mostly we’re seeing flu-B as far as the strain goes, we’re seeing more of that this year,” said Mangum.

The director of the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases said the nation is on track for a year as severe as the season in 2017 to 2018, the deadliest in more than four decades.

Mangum said symptoms such as abrupt onset of fever, body aches, respiratory symptoms, cough, sore throat, and a runny nose all are signs of the flu.

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Doctors, engineers, a teenage boy: Metro Vancouver mourns local plane crash victims – CTV News

January 8th, 2020

NORTH VANCOUVER — North Vancouver is home to the largest communities of Iranian Canadians in the country, and at least seven of them died in the Ukraine International Airlines crash near Tehran Tuesday night.

Homa Ghazi collapsed outside Amir Bakery on Lonsdale Street Wednesday, after learning her friends Ayeshe Pourghaderi and Fatemeh Pasavand, a mother and daughter who helped run that family business, died in the disaster.

“They are very good family, they open their store, I went to her house,” she sobbed. “They are very good person.“

Photographer Arash Azrahami took the pair’s passport photos for the trip to Iran.

“It was our close friend and customer, I’m shocked,” he said.

Husband and father Amir Pasavand stayed home to run the bakery, but told his wife and daughter they had to return to North Vancouver early after he got a surprise email from Immigration Canada.

“Their dad came to my studio last night at the exact time of the flight. He asked me to print some documents for citizenship. He told me in two days they have their citizenship exam.”

Pasavand is now headed to Iran to arrange two funerals.

Azrahami has also met and photographed North Vancouver victims Daniel Saket, an engineer, and his wife Fatemeh Kazerani, a dental hygienist.

Kimia Pourshaban Oshibi, a 19-year-old North Vancouver student, lost her parents in the crash. Nasar Pourshaban Oshibi and Firouzeh Madani were both doctors.

“I feel sad for the dreams that my parents had but couldn’t achieve it, their time was cut short,” said their daughter, who had been in Iran with her parents, but came home a week ago to resume classes.

“He was a very inquisitive person. He loved research. He loved reading. He taught me how to read at three years old. He thought it was the best thing he could give me, the best gift,” Pourshaban Oshibi said.

She fought back tears when asked what she would remember most about her mother.

“I will miss the open conversations with my mom,” she said. “We were very close. She was very open and we discussed a lot.”

A Port Coquitlam family of three – Ardalan Ebnoddin-Hamidi, his wife Niloofar Razzaghi, and their 15 year old son Kamyar were on their way home from a two week vacation when the plane went down. He was an engineer, and she a teacher on call. Coquitlam mayor Richard Stewart knew the family.

“They were really passionate about democracy. They organized all-candidates meetings during election campaigns, they organized festivals. They were there in every facet of Coquitlam life,” Stewart said. “There’s no question that this is a tragedy. There’s going to be a lot of tears shed over this loss.”

Langara College is reporting one of its students, 26 year old Delaram Dadashnejad, was among the victims. She was taking university transfer classes and had gone home to Iran for the holidays. Carson Graham Secondary school in North Vancouver says one of its students also died, as have two former UBC students.

With so many Canadian victims, it’s likely the names of more Metro Vancouver victims will be revealed in the coming days. 

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Remembering the people from Manitoba on board Flight PS752 – CBC.ca

January 8th, 2020

A Ukrainian International Airlines plane crashed shortly after takeoff Wednesday morning in Iran, killing all 176 people on board.

Among the victims of passenger Flight PS752 were 63 Canadians.

As of right now, CBC News has confirmed that at least eight of the victims were from Winnipeg.

CBC News is trying to confirm the status of other individuals from Winnipeg who may have also been on the flight.

This file is published as a tribute to the victims from Manitoba, and it will be updated as CBC News learns more.

Farzaneh Naderi

Farzaneh Naderi, a customer service manager at Walmart, spent her free time helping people living with intellectual disabilities at St. Amant, according to her niece Negysa Kalar.

She worked multiple jobs to provide for her family and had just moved into a new house in Winnipeg with her husband and 11-year-old son.

Farzaneh Naderi dedicated her free time to helping people living with intellectual disabilities. (Submitted by Iranian Community Of Manitoba)

Naderi and her son were on board the flight that crashed outside of Tehran, CBC News has confirmed.

“My aunt was so very smart. She worked very hard for her family, always provided, had multiple jobs to support her and … to support my uncle,” said Kalar.

Naderi was a dedicated tutor who genuinely cared about the children she supported, their families and her colleagues, said St. Amant spokesperson Jennifer Rodrigue in an email.

“We are all devastated by this loss and are holding Farzaneh and her son … in our hearts and thoughts,” Rodrigue said.

Naderi’s husband, Abolfazl Sadr, is currently en route to Tehran to identify the bodies, provide DNA samples and plan for the funeral.

Winnipeg woman Farzaneh Naderi and her 11-year-old son Noojan Sadr were on the Ukrainian passenger aircraft that crashed outside of Tehran on Wednesday, killing all 176 passengers on board including 63 Canadian citizens. (Submitted by Negysa Kalar)

Noojan Sadr

Noojan Sadr, Naderi’s son who was also on the flight, was described by Kalar as being a talented soccer player, who loved playing with her dog and doing crossword puzzles.

He was mature for his age, she noted.

Noojan Sadr is being remembered as wise beyond his years. His cousin says he talked about one day working in technology at a company like Google (Submitted by Iranian Community Of Manitoba)

“He was the brightest kid. His aspiration was to do something in technology and work for Google, or work for any one of those big companies. He really was such a smart 11-year-old kid,” she said.

“It’s hard to wrap your head around that such a small kid lost such a big life.”

Noojan and his mother had flown to Iran for the holidays, and were trying to get back to Winnipeg when the plane went down. 

Friends and family are gathering to honour the mother and son Thursday night in Winnipeg.

Mohammad Mahdi Sadeghi

Madhi Sadeghi, as he preferred to go by, was a civil engineer in Winnipeg. (Submitted by family)

Mohammad Mahdi Sadeghi, who went by Mahdi, was a civil engineer working at a Winnipeg-based construction company called Fresh Projects.

Sadeghi was a project administrator at the firm, who made sure project documents were organized and completed.

His role was to estimate project costs, ensure the right materials were being used, and make sure everything ran smoothly throughout construction and was going according to plan.

Fresh Projects owner Janice Froese told CBC News she will be speaking with Sadeghi’s family, who do not live in Winnipeg.

Sadeghi first came to Winnipeg in 2016, along with his wife Bahareh Hajesfandiari, family friend Mojtaba Montazeri told CBC News.

Bahareh Hajesfandiari

Hajesfandiari came to Winnipeg with her husband in 2016, and worked as a civil engineer. (Submitted by family)

Like her husband, Bahareh Hajesfandiari was a civil engineer. She worked for Marwest Construction, a firm in Winnipeg. 

“Bahareh was soft-spoken and kind to everyone. Despite her shyness, she quickly built meaningful relationships with many people,” said Armin W. Martens, president for the Marwest Group of Companies.

“Every conversation with her was a real conversation. She was immensely capable but the lasting impression will be the joy she brought us all. We will miss her tremendously.”

Prior to working at Marwest, Hajesfandiari worked at the Manitoba Interfaith Immigration Council on Bannatyne Avenue.

The only child to Bahareh and Mehdi, Anisa Sadeghi was a 10-year-old girl attending school in the Pembina Trails School Division. (Submitted by family)

Anisa Sadeghi

Anisa Sadeghi, 10, was the only child to Madhi Sadeghi and Bahareh Hajesfandiari.

Anisa was a Grade 5 student in the Pembina Trails School Division, it confirmed Tuesday

“She was a cute one, really kind and a nice kid,” said family friend Montazeri, adding that Anisa used to play with his kids and participated in sports like karate.

“Everyone is heartbroken now,” said Montazeri, speaking generally about the family of three.

“I think they were very successful immigrants here in Canada.”

Forough Khadem

Described as a promising scientist, Khadem graduated from the University of Manitoba in 2016 with a PhD in immunology.

That same year, Khadem was featured as a CBC Manitoba Future 40 nominee — which celebrates leaders, builders and change-makers under the age of 40 — for her research in developing immunity to a deadly infectious disease called leishmaniasis, and successfully identifying a new drug target for treating the disease.

Her findings were published in five journals, with one being highlighted on the cover page of a prestigious journal.

Forough Khadem graduated in 2016 from the University of Manitoba with a PhD in immunology. (Submitted by Amir Shirzadi)

“I am utterly devastated and trying to grapple with this,” said Jude Uzonna, an associate dean at the U of M’s faculty of health sciences who teaches immunology.

“Forough was one of my best PhD trainees, an outstanding scientist and above all, an amazing human being.” 

Khadem was in Tehran — the capital of Iran — to visit family who still live there, Uzonna said.

Khadem texted him Tuesday evening to say she was leaving Tehran. The message turned out to be the last contact he had with her.

Zahra Moussavi, biomedical engineering professor at the U of M, also knew Khadem.

“She was really a gem,” Moussavi said. “A real personality, despite many hardships. She was always laughing. Extremely cheerful.”

Khadem was working as a business development specialist in Winnipeg for Mitacs Inc., a Canada-wide not-for-profit.

“We are deeply saddened to hear that Forough Khadem was on Flight PS752 today. We extend our deepest condolences to Forough’s family and friends,” said Eric Bosco, chief business development officer for Mitacs.

“We will remember Forough’s passion for Mitacs, enthusiasm for innovation in Manitoba, and her positive outlook on life. We will miss her humour, her kindness and her warm spirit.”

Amirhossein Ghassemi

Amirhossein Ghassemi had been living in Winnipeg for just over a year to pursue a master’s degree in biomedical engineering at the University of Manitoba.

He was on his way back to Winnipeg after attending a family reunion in Iran.

“I lose a brother,” said his friend and fellow master’s student Morteza Tavakoli. 

Amirhossein Ghassemi was pursuing a master’s degree in biomedical engineering at the University of Manitoba. (Amirhossein Ghassemi/Facebook)

“Everywhere that we went, we were together. He was like a family to me.”

Tavakoli described Ghassemi as “helpful to everyone he met” and being optimistic toward the situation in their home country.

The two were texting each other just mere moments before Ghassemi boarded Flight PS752, Tavakoli said, adding that he warned his friend to be careful.

“I told him, once you’re on board, everything will be over. I was referring to worries,” Tavakoli said, his voice breaking. “But I didn’t really know that his life was about to be over.”

Before immigrating to Canada, Ghassemi was a physician in Iran, where he helped a number of people in a remote, southern part of his hometown of Kerman, said Tavakoli.

Moussavi was Ghassemi’s co-advisor at the U of M. She said it was a pleasure having him as a student.

“He was always cheerful and he worked so hard,” Moussavi said, adding that he complained often about her courses, “but he managed to get As.”

Ghassemi was researching the detection of epileptic activity by tracking a person’s brain waves during their sleep, she said.  

Apparently he was engaged and planned on going to Iran for the wedding next summer, before returning to Canada with his wife, Moussavi said.

“I’m still very shaken,” she said. “When it happens to people that are so close to you — especially that they’re all young — it is so hard to believe and cope.”

CBC News has confirmed that at least six of the victims were from Winnipeg. 2:41

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