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Archive for May 1st, 2020

Hidalgo orders Harris County gyms, bars, salons closed through May 20 – Houston Chronicle

May 1st, 2020

Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo, wary of the continued threat of the novel coronavirus, on Friday evening ordered all nonessential businesses not reopened by Gov. Greg Abbott to remain closed until May 20.

These firms include: gyms, public pools, amusement parks, bowling alleys, concert and bingo halls, game rooms, indoor sports facilities, barbers, hair and nail salons, as well as massage, tattoo and piercing parlors.

Bars must remain closed, but drive-thru and to-go alcohol sales are permitted.

Abbott on Friday opened most businesses that had been closed under his statewide stay-at-home order. Retail businesses, restaurants, movie theaters, churches libraries, museums and malls were allowed to open at 25 percent capacity.

Harris County residents remain under mandatory face-covering rules in public places through May 22.

Hidalgo’s Harris County stay-at-home order, which went into effect March 24, expired Thursday. She has cited a good working relationship with the governor throughout the pandemic. Abbott’s reopening of businesses, however, came before Harris County had met Hidalgo’s benchmarks she said were necessary to do so: a peak of the virus here and the availability of widespread testing.

Hidalgo said Thursday she was confident Abbott would re-examine his order, which supersedes all local rules, if the state experienced a surge in cases.

The Houston region added 299 cases Friday, a 3 percent increase to 9,529. The eight-county region has 196 deaths from the virus.

zach.despart@chron.com

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People with coronavirus can be infectious for longer than previously thought, must isolate for longer: L.A. County health agency – KTLA

May 1st, 2020

New evidence suggests people who test positive for the coronavirus can stay infectious for longer than previously thought, Los Angeles County’s public health director Dr. Barbara Ferrer said Friday.

This will mean that those who test positive will need to self-isolate for longer, even those who have no symptoms.

“A person may be able to infect other people for a longer period of time than was initially thought when we had the guidance that people needed to self-isolate for 7 days, plus 72 hours after fever and symptoms subsided,” Ferrer said.

Now, L.A. County’s guidance for those infected, or presumed to be infected, is that they should stay home and away from others for at least 10 days after symptoms first appear, and 72 hours after fever and symptoms subside, without the use of fever-reducing medication.

Ferrer said health agencies continue learn more about the virus.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also updated its guidance for isolation earlier this week.

Those who come in contact with someone with COVID-19 still have to quarantine for 14 days from when they last had contact with that person, and then isolate if symptoms appear.

“And if you think you may be positive, you need to stay away from other people until you get a test result that says something different,” Ferrer said.

Ferrer told county residents with symptoms to call their healthcare provider, and those that don’t have one to call 211 for help from the county.

The CDC has recently expanded its list of COVID-19 symptoms. In addition to fever, cough and shortness of breath, the symptoms of the respiratory illness now also include chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat and loss of taste or smell.

Those who have to self-isolate should stay away from all other people and pets, avoid preparing or serving meals for others, or sharing food, cups or utensils with others, according to the health department.

They should also stay in a separate room and try to use a separate bathroom than others at the household.

In L.A. County, all residents can sign up online for free coronavirus testing at one of 35 sites throughout the county. Though testing is now open to people without symptoms, those with symptoms, or are 65 years or older, have underlying health conditions, live in congregate settings or work essential jobs are being prioritized.

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Diplo hosts live Major Lazer set in Fortnite’s Party Royale mode – Engadget

May 1st, 2020

States are easing coronavirus restrictions and ‘it’s going to cost lives,’ researcher says – WGHP FOX 8 Greensboro

May 1st, 2020

Most states are taking steps to ease social distancing restrictions and the federal government has approved an experimental drug to treat Covid-19 patients.

But pandemic experts say reopening the country is a “big mistake.”

“You’re making a big mistake. It’s going to cost lives,” Dr. Irwin Redlener, a pediatrician and disaster preparedness specialist at Columbia University Medical Center, told CNN on Friday.

Redlener and Joseph Fair, a senior fellow in pandemic policy at Texas A&M University, sent a report to all governors on Friday, warning them that no state or city should reduce restrictions until coronavirus infections have been steadily decreasing for 10 days to two weeks, and not until enough tests are available to assess just how many people really are infected.

Redlener’s warning comes as more than 30 states are easing social distancing restrictions this weekend. The changes ranged from opening state parks to allowing some businesses to restart.

States are knowingly reopening against the advice of medical experts and are making “a judgment call … that there’s an acceptable level of risk and harm because of need or desire to open up,” CNN national security analyst Juliette Kayyem said Friday.

“There will be more dead people. Just say it,” Kayyem told CNN’s “New Day.” “It’s an experiment we’re living in real time.”

Covid-19 has killed more than 64,000 people in the United States and infected more than 1 million nationwide, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said some states are “leapfrogging” federal guidelines, which include a decrease in cases over a 14-day period and a return to pre-crisis conditions in hospitals.

“And, I mean, obviously you could get away with that, but you are making a really significant risk,” Fauci said during CNN’s town hall on coronavirus Thursday night.

Virus is ‘running amok’ in New Mexico city

A city in New Mexico bordering the Navajo Nation has been placed under lockdown after the spread of the virus has been “frightful,” Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said.

All roads to Gallup have been closed, businesses must close between 5 p.m. and 8 a.m. and vehicles can only carry two individuals, according to the governor’s order. The governor is recommending that residents remain at home except for emergency outings and those essential for health and safety.

“The spread of this virus in McKinley County is frightful,” Lujan Grisham said. “And it shows that physical distancing has not occurred and is not occurring. The virus is running amok there. It must be stopped, and stricter measures are necessary.”

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said he supports the decision as many members reside in Gallup and travel in the area.

Meanwhile in California, thousands of people gathered in Huntington Beach to protest the governor’s order to close all beaches and parks in Orange County.

The protests took place on the same day that local health officials announced the highest increase in new cases since the outbreak began.

FDA approved drug to treat several cases of Covid-19

Remdesivir became the first approved treatment for patients with severe cases of Covid-19 in the US on Friday.

The US Food and Drug Administration issued the emergency approval, which is a lower regulatory bar than full FDA approval, saying the benefits of the drug outweigh its risks in patients.

Denise Hinton, the FDA’s chief scientist, said in the authorization letter that there is “no adequate, approved, and available alternative to the emergency use of remdesivir for the treatment of COVID-19.”

While the optimal dosing is still unknown, Gilead Sciences, the drug’s manufacturer, recommends that patients on ventilators take the drug through an IV for 10 days and non-ventilator patients only five days.

The drug was approvedjust days after researchers said the drug might help patients recover more quickly from the infection.

Gilead CEO Daniel O’Day said Friday in an Oval Office event that the company will be working with the federal government “to make sure that we get that to the patients in need as quickly as possible.”

Earlier on Friday, O’Day said in an interview on NBC’s “Today” show that researchers are examining whether the drug could be delivered as a subcutaneous injection or orally.

That would be “with the intention that maybe we can treat patients earlier — earlier in the hospital setting and perhaps even outside of the hospital setting,” O’Day said.

States are easing and imposing restrictions

The approaches by state governors to reopening have differed significantly. Some are easing coronavirus restrictions while others are imposing new ones or extending those already in place.

Here are some of the measures states have taken:

• New York, like many other states, will keep school buildings closed through the rest of the academic year — though remote instruction will continue, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Friday.

• Georgia’s general shelter-in place order expired Friday, though “medically fragile and elderly” people are to remain at home through June 12. Some businesses were allowed to reopen in the last few days, and they’re required to observe strict social distancing measures until at least May 13.

Ohio’s stay-at-home order goes until May 29, but certain businesses are expected to reopen in phases through the month. Starting Friday, previously restricted outpatient health procedures can move forward, and dentist and veterinarian offices can reopen. On Monday, manufacturing, distribution and construction companies and general offices may reopen with certain health guidelines.

• Some states are easing less. New Jersey opens state and county parks and golf courses Saturday, and Virginia is allowing elective surgeries and dental procedures to resume Friday. But both states are expected to keep general stay-at-home orders for weeks.

Limited testing and travel fueled coronavirus spread, CDC says

International travel and a lack of testing, among other factors, accelerated the spread of coronavirus in the early days of the US outbreak, a report released Friday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows.

Dr. Anne Schuchat, the CDC’s principal deputy director, wrote that four major factors sped transmission of the virus in March.

  • Travelers infected elsewhere importing the virus to the US.
  • Attendance at professional and social events.
  • Introduction of the virus into facilities prone to amplification, including nursing homes and high-density urban areas.
  • Issues detecting the virus like limited testing, the virus’ emergence during flu season, and people who were asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic.

While it’s impossible to quantify the contribution that each factor had in the outbreak, Schuchat says, recognizing them would help inform future responses as some regions scale back mitigation measures.

Two more years of pandemic misery predicted

As states grapple with the most efficient way to reopen their economies, experts are warning that relief may not be coming any time soon.

Coronavirus will likely keep spreading for another 18 months to two years — until 60% to 70% of the world’s population has been infected, a team of pandemic experts predicted Thursday in a new report.

The United States should prepare for a worst-case scenario that includes a second big wave of coronavirus infections in the fall and winter, the report said. Even in a best-case scenario, people will continue to die from the virus.

“This thing’s not going to stop until it infects 60 to 70% of people,” said Michael Osterholm, who directs the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. “The idea that this is going to be done soon defies microbiology.”

Osterholm has written about pandemics for 20 years and served as an adviser to several presidents. He said it’ll take nearly two years for herd immunity to gradually develop among humans.

A vaccine could help, the report said, but isn’t expected quickly. “The course of the pandemic also could be influenced by a vaccine; however, a vaccine will likely not be available until at least sometime in 2021,” the report reads.

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How Remdesivir, New Hope for Covid-19 Patients, Was Resurrected – msnNOW

May 1st, 2020


a group of people standing next to a person in a suit and tie: President Trump in the Oval Office on Friday flanked by, from left, Vice President Pence; Daniel O’Day, the Gilead Sciences C.E.O.; and Stephen Hahn, the F.D.A. commissioner.
© Erin Schaff/The New York Times President Trump in the Oval Office on Friday flanked by, from left, Vice President Pence; Daniel O’Day, the Gilead Sciences C.E.O.; and Stephen Hahn, the F.D.A. commissioner.

Remdesivir, an antiviral drug designed to treat both hepatitis and a common respiratory virus, seemed fated to join thousands of other failed medications after proving useless against those diseases. The drug was consigned to the pharmaceutical scrap heap, all but forgotten by the scientists who once championed it.

But on Friday, the Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency approval for remdesivir as a treatment for patients severely ill with Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

The story of remdesivir’s rescue and transformation testifies to the powerful role played by federal funding, which allowed scientists laboring in obscurity to pursue basic research without obvious financial benefits. This research depends almost entirely on government grants.

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Dr. Mark Denison of Vanderbilt University is one of a handful of researchers who discovered remdesivir’s potential. He began studying coronaviruses a quarter-century ago, a time when few scientists cared about them — the ones infecting humans caused colds, he recalled, and scientists just wanted to know how they worked.

“We were interested from the biologic perspective,” Dr. Denison recalled. “No one was interested from a therapeutic perspective.”

Neither he nor the scores of other scientists interested in coronaviruses foresaw that a new one would unleash a plague that has killed nearly a quarter-million people worldwide. The F.D.A. rushed to approve remdesivir under emergency use provisions, after a federal trial demonstrated modest improvements in severely ill patients.


Vials of remdesivir at a Gilead Sciences facility in La Verne, Calif.
© Gilead Sciences, via Reuters Vials of remdesivir at a Gilead Sciences facility in La Verne, Calif.

The trial, sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, included more than 1,000 hospitalized patients and found that those receiving remdesivir recovered faster than those who got a placebo: in 11 days, versus 15 days. But the drug did not significantly reduce fatality rates.

Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the results were “a very important proof of concept” but not a “knockout.” President Trump hailed the drug on Friday as “an important treatment and “really promising.”

Slideshow by photo services

Remdesivir is approved only for severely ill patients and only temporarily; formal approval must come later. Still, some doctors laboring in intensive care units embraced the drug as an important new weapon against a virus that is killing patients worldwide.

“It’s a great first step,” said Dr. Robert Finberg, chairman of the department of medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Little about the early history of remdesivir, manufactured by Gilead Sciences, suggested the hopes now placed upon it.

Coronaviruses hold much more RNA than scientists once theorized a virus could. Many viruses that cause epidemics rely on this type of genetic material, and almost all mutate constantly. That is why flu viruses change from year to year.

Yet coronaviruses did not change much — their mutation rate is about one-twentieth the rate of other RNA viruses.

In 2007, Dr. Denison discovered that coronaviruses have a powerful “proofreading” system. If an error occurs in copying RNA as the coronavirus replicates, it corrects the error. In lab experiments, coronaviruses that mutated were weaker, outcompeted by those without mutations.

Dr. Denison and other experts wondered if it might be possible to trick the virus with a drug that dodged the proofreading system and blocked the virus’s growing RNA chain, making it prematurely terminate.

Talking about this problem with another scientist at a meeting, Dr. Denison learned that Gilead Sciences had dozens of drugs that might do the trick. “All of these compounds had been shelved for one reason or another,” Dr. Denison said.

Most worked in lab tests to shut down coronaviruses, he found — some better than others. One of the best was GS-5734, now known as remdesivir. “I like to call it the Terminator,” Dr. Denison said.

Dr. Denison discovered remdesivir was just what they were seeking: a drug that slipped past the viruses’s powerful system to protect RNA, their genetic material. Remdesivir made growing chains of the viral RNA terminate prematurely, killing the virus.

Remdesivir killed every known coronavirus in Dr. Denison’s tests. Then researchers at the University of North Carolina found that the drug also killed the viruses in infected animals.

That included not just coronaviruses that cause the common cold, but also SARS and MERS — even a coronavirus that infects only mice.

But the drug failed a number of real-life tests — not just against hepatitis but also against Ebola in Africa. The drug languished, unapproved for any use — until a new coronavirus emerged.

As SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, began to grow into a pandemic, many scientists realized that remdesivir might be the best solution at hand. It had already undergone animal testing and safety testing in humans.

So doctors began giving it to patients in studies without controls and even outside of studies altogether. Anecdotes fueled demand. Gilead sponsored some of these studies and gave the drug to doctors who treated hundreds of patients under compassionate use, a legal exemption permitting use of an unapproved drug to treat patients.

But none of this could demonstrate that a drug was helpful to patients. It took the federal trial, in which many patients were given a placebo, to show that remdesivir seems to have a modest effect.

Even a modest effect from the drug in hospitalized patients was a surprise, said Dr. Arnold Monto, an epidemiologist at the University of Michigan. He had expected that patients like those in the federal trial would not respond.

They were severely ill, and such patients often suffer not from their viral infections but from overreactions of the immune system. (That is why Tamiflu does not work well in severely ill flu patients, he added.)

“Thank God, we have something that works,” Dr. Monto said.

Not everyone is convinced that remdesivir will live up to its promise. A study in China, published this week in Lancet, found the drug offered no benefit to severely ill patients. And many experts want to see the data from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases trial; so far, there have been only announcements about the results from administration officials.

Despite these questions, Gilead has been ramping up production and currently has 1.5 million vials on hand, enough for about 150,000 patients. Those will be provided to patients at no cost, said Daniel O’Day, the company’s chief executive.

He would not discuss what Gilead might charge in the long run, following a formal approval, but remdesivir is unlikely to be cheap, despite its origins in federally funded research.

“Gilead discovered this medicine and developed this medicine,” Mr. O’Day said. “We have been involved all the way.”

Some experts fear that taxpayers won’t get their due.

“Their pricing should reflect that the government not only invested substantial funds, but at risky stages,” said Dr. Aaron Kesselheim, a professor of medicine at Harvard University who studies drug pricing.

If Gilead reaps all the rewards, he added, “that doesn’t seem fair.”

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How Remdesivir, New Hope for Covid-19 Patients, Was Resurrected – The New York Times

May 1st, 2020

Remdesivir, an antiviral drug designed to treat both hepatitis and a common respiratory virus, seemed fated to join thousands of other failed medications after proving useless against those diseases. The drug was consigned to the pharmaceutical scrap heap, all but forgotten by the scientists who once championed it.

But on Friday, the Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency approval for remdesivir as a treatment for patients severely ill with Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

The story of remdesivir’s rescue and transformation testifies to the powerful role played by federal funding, which allowed scientists laboring in obscurity to pursue basic research without obvious financial benefits. This research depends almost entirely on government grants.

Dr. Mark Denison of Vanderbilt University is one of a handful of researchers who discovered remdesivir’s potential. He began studying coronaviruses a quarter-century ago, a time when few scientists cared about them — the ones infecting humans caused colds, he recalled, and scientists just wanted to know how they worked.

“We were interested from the biologic perspective,” Dr. Denison recalled. “No one was interested from a therapeutic perspective.”

Neither he nor the scores of other scientists interested in coronaviruses foresaw that a new one would unleash a plague that has killed nearly a quarter-million people worldwide. The F.D.A. rushed to approve remdesivir under emergency use provisions, after a federal trial demonstrated modest improvements in severely ill patients.

The trial, sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, included more than 1,000 hospitalized patients and found that those receiving remdesivir recovered faster than those who got a placebo: in 11 days, versus 15 days. But the drug did not significantly reduce fatality rates.

Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the results were “a very important proof of concept” but not a “knockout.” President Trump hailed the drug on Friday as “an important treatment” and “really promising.”

Remdesivir is approved only for severely ill patients and only temporarily; formal approval must come later. Still, some doctors laboring in intensive care units embraced the drug as an important new weapon against a virus that is killing patients worldwide.

“It’s a great first step,” said Dr. Robert Finberg, chairman of the department of medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

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Little about the early history of remdesivir, manufactured by Gilead Sciences, suggested the hopes now placed upon it.

Coronaviruses hold much more RNA than scientists once theorized a virus could. Many viruses that cause epidemics rely on this type of genetic material, and almost all mutate constantly. That is why flu viruses change from year to year.

In 2007, Dr. Denison discovered that coronaviruses have a powerful “proofreading” system. If an error occurs in copying RNA as the coronavirus replicates, it corrects the error. In lab experiments, coronaviruses that mutated were weaker, outcompeted by those without mutations.

Dr. Denison and other experts wondered if it might be possible to trick the virus with a drug that dodged the proofreading system and blocked the virus’s growing RNA chain, making it prematurely terminate.

Talking about this problem with another scientist at a meeting, Dr. Denison learned that Gilead Sciences had dozens of drugs that might do the trick. “All of these compounds had been shelved for one reason or another,” Dr. Denison said.

Most worked in lab tests to shut down coronaviruses, he found — some better than others. One of the best was GS-5734, now known as remdesivir. “I like to call it the Terminator,” Dr. Denison said.

Remdesivir killed every known coronavirus in Dr. Denison’s tests. Then researchers at the University of North Carolina found that the drug also killed the viruses in infected animals.

That included not just coronaviruses that cause the common cold, but also SARS and MERS — even a coronavirus that infects only mice.

But the drug failed a number of real-life tests — not just against hepatitis but also against Ebola in Africa. The drug languished, unapproved for any use — until a new coronavirus emerged.

As SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, began to grow into a pandemic, many scientists realized that remdesivir might be the best solution at hand. It had already undergone animal testing and safety testing in humans.

So doctors began giving it to patients in studies without controls and even outside of studies altogether. Anecdotes fueled demand. Gilead sponsored some of these studies and gave the drug to doctors who treated hundreds of patients under compassionate use, a legal exemption permitting use of an unapproved drug to treat patients.

But none of this could demonstrate that a drug was helpful to patients. It took the federal trial, in which many patients were given a placebo, to show that remdesivir seems to have a modest effect.

Even a modest effect from the drug in hospitalized patients was a surprise, said Dr. Arnold Monto, an epidemiologist at the University of Michigan. He had expected that patients like those in the federal trial would not respond.

They were severely ill, and such patients often suffer not from their viral infections but from overreactions of the immune system. (That is why Tamiflu does not work well in severely ill flu patients, he added.)

“Thank God, we have something that works,” Dr. Monto said.

Not everyone is convinced that remdesivir will live up to its promise. A study in China, published this week in Lancet, found the drug offered no benefit to severely ill patients. And many experts want to see the data from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases trial; so far, there have been only announcements about the results from administration officials.

Despite these questions, Gilead has been ramping up production and currently has 1.5 million vials on hand, enough for about 150,000 patients. Those will be provided to patients at no cost, said Daniel O’Day, the company’s chief executive.

He would not discuss what Gilead might charge in the long run, following a formal approval, but remdesivir is unlikely to be cheap, despite its origins in federally funded research.

“Gilead discovered this medicine and developed this medicine,” Mr. O’Day said. “We have been involved all the way.”

Some experts fear that taxpayers won’t get their due.

“Their pricing should reflect that the government not only invested substantial funds, but at risky stages,” said Dr. Aaron Kesselheim, a professor of medicine at Harvard University who studies drug pricing.

If Gilead reaps all the rewards, he added, “that doesn’t seem fair.”

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County to Expand Testing and Tracing Staff – countynewscenter.com

May 1st, 2020

The County’s Health and Human Services Agency will hire or retrain more than 500 staff to conduct COVID-19 testing and tracing as part of its efforts to fight the virus. The testing focus will be on at-risk populations, including residents in senior living facilities and low-income communities.

“Our commitment at the County is to keep a sharp focus on the priority populations, the vulnerable and underserved people that (Wilma Wooten, M.D., County public health officer) has identified in her recent testing guidance,” said HHSA Director Nick Macchione. “This will require us to get a little more creative in taking the testing to the places where it is needed most.”

In an effort to meet the region’s testing goals, the County will deploy several mobile testing sites to at-risk communities. In addition to the new Live Well Bus, the County Library’s bookmobiles and other County vehicles will also be used as mobile testing sites soon.

New Testing and Tracing Staff

The County currently has a staff of more than 120 case and contact tracers who have conducted more than 4,000 COVID-19 investigations since the beginning of the public health crisis. Each confirmed positive case generates an average of three contact investigations.

The County is proposing to expand the number of contact tracers to 450 in the coming months. This pool of tracers will be made up of current County employees and external applicants. The County today posted an opening for temporary contact tracers.

The County also plans to hire an additional 200 public health nurses to help support the area’s testing efforts. The region’s Laboratory Task Force has set a goal of testing 5,200 people a day, with that figure based on Harvard research being used by the federal and state government to set COVID-19 testing numbers.

Face Coverings Mandatory

As of today, all San Diego County residents are required to wear cloth face coverings in public when within 6 feet of another person who is not a household member, or whenever entering a store or other business. The cloth facial coverings, which will be required until further notice, don’t have to be hospital grade, but should cover the nose and mouth.

While local law enforcement agencies will focus on education about the new public health orders about face coverings, the County is providing 10,000 face coverings to local law enforcement entities so officers can distribute them to the public when they contact individuals.

10 New COVID-19 Deaths and 147 New Cases Reported

Ten more COVID-19 deaths have been reported bringing the region’s total to 134. Of those who died, seven were men and three were women. Their ages range from 52 to 92 years. The ten individuals died between April 18 and 30.

The total COVID-19 cases in the County increased to 3,711 cases, which is 147 more cases than were reported yesterday.

The number of outbreaks, deaths and cases at nursing homes and other congregate living facilities are:

  • 54 active outbreaks; 36 at congregate living facilities and 18 in community settings
  • 64 deaths and 882 cases in congregate living facilities
  • 5 deaths and 149 cases in community settings

More COVID-19 Information

The County’s COVID-19 webpage contains additional information on the disease, including a graph showing new positive cases and total cases reported by date. The data is also broken down by gender, race and ethnic/race group. An interactive dashboard with several COVID-19 indicators is being updated daily. For more information, visit coronavirus-sd.com.

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Fortnite Hosting Diplo, Major Lazer Concert In Party Royale Mode – GameSpot

May 1st, 2020

Boosted was developing two bikes and a super-powered electric skateboard – The Verge

May 1st, 2020

Convalescent Plasma Therapy for COVID-19 patients in Lancaster – WGAL Susquehanna Valley Pa.

May 1st, 2020

Demand is high for Convalescent Plasma therapy to treat COVID-19 patients.WGAL News 8’s Susan Shapiro spoke to the first person to donate to the new program at Lancaster General Health. Matt Woolley enjoyed a ski trip in early March in Utah, but when he returned home to Montgomery County he became ill. Woolley tells us it, “Started off with typical flu like symptoms.” Those symptoms progressed and he was diagnosed with COVID-19. He says it was, “Not easy but obviously could have been worse compared to other stories I hear about folks now.”Now that he has recovered, he is helping other COVID-19 patients. Woolley was the first patient to donate convalescent plasma at Lancaster General Health. His plasma, filled with antibodies, is being given to two critically ill patients. The therapy has shown promise in helping patients with the virus. The Director of the LG Health Blood Bank, Doctor Sarah Nassau tells us the demand for convalescent plasma is exceeding the supply across the nation. She says, “We want to collect and add to the supply and be able to treat patients in our community.” Dr. Nassau appreciates donors like Woolley. The 48-year-old, who is in the mortgage business, says it’s a way to pay it forward, saying, “Those of us who did have it and recovered we do can our part to pay it forward to those are really struggling with this virus.” He adds that the process was quick and easy with zero pain. Patients who have recovered from COVID-19 have to meet certain requirements to donate plasma. You can find out more at lghealth.org/COVIDplasma.Patients can also donate to the Red Cross.

Demand is high for Convalescent Plasma therapy to treat COVID-19 patients.

WGAL News 8’s Susan Shapiro spoke to the first person to donate to the new program at Lancaster General Health.

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Matt Woolley enjoyed a ski trip in early March in Utah, but when he returned home to Montgomery County he became ill.

Woolley tells us it, “Started off with typical flu like symptoms.” Those symptoms progressed and he was diagnosed with COVID-19. He says it was, “Not easy but obviously could have been worse compared to other stories I hear about folks now.”

Now that he has recovered, he is helping other COVID-19 patients.

Woolley was the first patient to donate convalescent plasma at Lancaster General Health. His plasma, filled with antibodies, is being given to two critically ill patients. The therapy has shown promise in helping patients with the virus.

The Director of the LG Health Blood Bank, Doctor Sarah Nassau tells us the demand for convalescent plasma is exceeding the supply across the nation. She says, “We want to collect and add to the supply and be able to treat patients in our community.”

Dr. Nassau appreciates donors like Woolley. The 48-year-old, who is in the mortgage business, says it’s a way to pay it forward, saying, “Those of us who did have it and recovered we do can our part to pay it forward to those are really struggling with this virus.”

He adds that the process was quick and easy with zero pain.

Patients who have recovered from COVID-19 have to meet certain requirements to donate plasma.

You can find out more at lghealth.org/COVIDplasma.

Patients can also donate to the Red Cross.

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