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Archive for May 2nd, 2020

Man survives COVID-19, celebrates with friends, after days in ICU, medically induced coma – WLWT Cincinnati

May 2nd, 2020

Bud Johnson is grateful to be alive.Saturday, he celebrated his recovery with friends near and far following a long, grueling fight with COVID-19.”I went to the hospital a couple of days after my birthday, and the next thing I know, they’re talking about how I’m getting ready to die,” Bud said.Bud recently turned 71 years old.At the end of March, he was diagnosed with the coronavirus and placed in the ICU at the Christ Hospital.”It’s been kind of nerve-wracking, especially when they told me he was on a ventilator, and then they had to put him in a coma,” Bud’s wife, Iola Johnson, said. Family and friends were unable to see him for 40 days during his darkest hours.That changed Saturday afternoon when more than 100 people surprised Bud with a welcome home parade as he’s slowly gaining his strength back.”We’re just coming out here trying to support him, let him know that he has a lot of love,” Bud’s friend Carl Tuck said.People were holding signs and honking their horns, the line of cars, seemingly never ending.Bud suffers from an underlying health condition and has a defibrillator.Even more of a reason he’s thankful to be here today.”The doctor said to me you must be strong because it didn’t go off, so we’re going to work with you because you’re going to make it,” Bud said.He’s looking forward to a healthier future and urges everyone to stay safe.”I just want everyone to protect themselves protect their children and do what you gotta do to stay alive,” Bud said.

Bud Johnson is grateful to be alive.

Saturday, he celebrated his recovery with friends near and far following a long, grueling fight with COVID-19.

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“I went to the hospital a couple of days after my birthday, and the next thing I know, they’re talking about how I’m getting ready to die,” Bud said.

Bud recently turned 71 years old.

At the end of March, he was diagnosed with the coronavirus and placed in the ICU at the Christ Hospital.

“It’s been kind of nerve-wracking, especially when they told me he was on a ventilator, and then they had to put him in a coma,” Bud’s wife, Iola Johnson, said.

Family and friends were unable to see him for 40 days during his darkest hours.

That changed Saturday afternoon when more than 100 people surprised Bud with a welcome home parade as he’s slowly gaining his strength back.

“We’re just coming out here trying to support him, let him know that he has a lot of love,” Bud’s friend Carl Tuck said.

People were holding signs and honking their horns, the line of cars, seemingly never ending.

Bud suffers from an underlying health condition and has a defibrillator.

Even more of a reason he’s thankful to be here today.

“The doctor said to me you must be strong because it didn’t go off, so we’re going to work with you because you’re going to make it,” Bud said.

He’s looking forward to a healthier future and urges everyone to stay safe.

“I just want everyone to protect themselves protect their children and do what you gotta do to stay alive,” Bud said.

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North Korea, South Korea exchange gunfire across border, raising tensions – Global News

May 2nd, 2020

North and South Korea exchanged gunfire around the South’s guard post early on Sunday, raising tension a day after North Korean leader Kim Jong Un ended an almost three-week absence from public life with state media showing him visiting a factory.

READ MORE: Kim Jong Un makes first public appearance in weeks: North Korea state media

Multiple gunshots were fired from North Korea at 7:41 a.m. local time towards a guard post in South Korea that borders the North, the South’s joint chiefs of staffs said in a statement.

1:37South Korea says North Korea’s Kim may be trying to avoid coronavirus

South Korea says North Korea’s Kim may be trying to avoid coronavirus

South Korea responded by firing two shots towards North Korea, no injuries were reported.

READ MORE: Uncertainty over Kim Jong Un’s health exposes intelligence limits in North Korea

After weeks of intense speculation about Kim’s health and whereabouts, the country’s official media published photographs and a report on Saturday that Kim had attended the completion of a fertilizer plant, the first report of his appearance since April 11.

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1:53Coronavirus outbreak: UN says North Korea should allow outside help

Coronavirus outbreak: UN says North Korea should allow outside help

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Kern County health officer revokes emergency order that assisted with shelter-in-place orders – KERO 23ABC News

May 2nd, 2020

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. — The Kern County health officer has revoked public health’s emergency order Saturday evening, according to the Kern County Public Health Services Department.

The order was passed on April 2, which expanded the powers of county health officer Kirstopher Lyon, to assist shelter-in-place orders instituted by governor Gavin Newsom.

“Over the past several weeks, Kern County Public Health has been working with local businesses to provide education and resources during the Governor’s stay at home order. We have responded to complaints from our residents and have been pleased with the cooperation from our local business community.”

The decision to end the order follows Newsom’s announcement Saturday, that the state is “days, not weeks,” away from changes to the stay-at-home orders, according to public health.

“In anticipation of the Governor’s transition of re-opening the economy, we want the county to be positioned so we can quickly maximize our local response and clear the way for the changes ahead,” a public health press release said.

“We want businesses to open safely and responsibly and as quickly as possible when the Governor lifts or modifies his orders.”

The release states that public health will collaborate with Kern County Board of Supervisor’s new committee, which aims towards safely re-opening local businesses.

Senate Republican Leader Shannon Grove of Bakersfield praises Lyon’s decision to revoke the order.

“Tonight’s action is a first step to allow families to get out more while still practicing proper physical distancing and is also a critical step to ensure that our local businesses can gradually start to resume operations again,” Grove said in a statement sent to 23ABC News.

For now, public health is asking the public to abide by Newsom’s shelter-in-place order, until he announces changes to the order.

Health officials are not expected to provide any other details until Monday.

This is a developing story, please check back for updates.

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Coronavirus contact-tracing apps under development, but Michigan isn’t joining the effort – Detroit Free Press

May 2nd, 2020

BTS Wins Favorite Music Group At 2020 Nickelodeon Kids’ Choice Awards – soompi

May 2nd, 2020

BTS took home an award at the 2020 Nickelodeon Kids’ Choice Awards!

This year’s Kids’ Choice Awards was held on May 2 (local time) and took place virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Awards and performances were presented remotely instead of having audiences and performers attend an in-person event.

BTS won Favorite Music Group at the Kids’ Choice Awards, and a clip of the group accepting the award was shared during the virtual ceremony.

RM kicked off their speech saying, “Wow this is amazing. Thank you so much. So happy to get this award.” V said, “Thank you for voting for us, ARMY. Your love keeps us going,” and Jin continued, “Thank you so much for loving our new album ‘Map of the Soul: 7.’ Hope we can see you soon.” Suga shared, “We are doing great working very, very, very hard on our music,” while Jungkook expressed, “We miss you, ARMY, so, so much, and hopefully, see you soon!” J-Hope said, “Stay safe and connected. We hope everything will get better soon,” and Jimin wrapped up with the words, “Thank you ARMY and thank you Kids’ Choice Awards.”

BTS previously won Favorite Global Music Star at the 2018 Kids’ Choice Awards.

Congratulations to BTS! Watch them accept the Favorite Music Group award below:

How does this article make you feel?

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Coronavirus Report: University Of Minnesota Researchers Say Pandemic Could Last Up To 2 Years – CBS Minnesota

May 2nd, 2020

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A new report from researchers at the University of Minnesota says we may need to prepare for the impacts of COVID-19 for the next two years.

Dr. Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the U of M, was one of several experts detailing three possible scenarios.

He says we need to understand that we are only at the beginning of the pandemic. He compared it to being in the second inning of a nine inning baseball game.

The report lays out the three scenarios, the first has the virus coming back in peaks or valleys over a year or two, requiring social distancing measures each time it peaks.

The second would be a much larger peak this fall – which would require another quarantine.

A third scenario shows a “slow burn” of illness, but not at a rate that would overwhelm hospitals.

“We are in this for the long hall. We’ve been saying for some time, ‘this is not just get over this hump right now’ and then we’re back it,” Osterholm said. “We are surely looking at how to reopen our state relative to what we’ve been through. But we’re going to be back at this multiple times between now and the next several years.”

Researchers say that whichever scenario the pandemic follows, “we must be prepared for at least another 18 to 24 months of significant COVID-19 activity, with hot spots popping up periodically in diverse geographic areas.”

Osterholm says a vaccine could save us, but he says we won’t have one for at least another 10 to 14 months.

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“I’m starving now”: World faces unprecedented hunger crisis amid coronavirus pandemic – CBS News

May 2nd, 2020

It’s Friday morning in Alexandra township – a poor neighborhood on the outskirts of South Africa’s largest city, Johannesburg – and dozens of people are gathered in a field outside a food distribution point, hoping today might be the day they get something to eat.

“If you’re hungry, it’s easy to get sick from stress and everything,” says Mduduzi Khumalo, who’s been lining up every day for two weeks. To get food your name has to be on the list and, so far, despite registering multiple times, his hasn’t been.

Khumalo worked as a delivery man before South Africa’s coronavirus lockdown decimated his income. His children used to get two meals a day at school, but schools are closed now. Every day, the kids wait for him at the family’s tiny home, and every day brings the same bad news.

“They know that if I don’t get anything for them, it’s over,” Khumalo tells CBS News.

Famines “of biblical proportions”

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Residents of Diepsloot in South Africa wait for food but go home empty handed of Friday, April 23.  CBS News

The coronavirus pandemic has left the world facing an unprecedented hunger crisis. The United Nations World Food Program (WFP) has warned that by the end of the year, more than 260 million people will face starvation – double last year’s figures.

“In a worst-case scenario, we could be looking at famine in about three dozen countries,” warned WFP director David Beasley. He said the world could face multiple famines “of biblical proportions within a few short months.”

Oil prices have collapsed, tourism is drying up, and overseas remittances – foreign workers transferring money to their families in other countries – on which many people depend for survival, are expected to decline sharply.

There’s “a real danger that more people could potentially die from the economic impact of COVID-19 than from the virus itself,” Beasley said.

Sub-Saharan Africa particularly at risk

If global GDP declines by 5% because of the pandemic, another 147 million people could be plunged into extreme poverty, according to estimates by the Washington-based International Food Policy Research Institute.

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Children wait for food aid from their parents near Johannesburg, South Africa, on Friday, April 23. CBS News

More than half of those people – 79 million – live in sub-Saharan Africa, David Laborde Debucquet, a senior research fellow at IFPRI, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. Another 42 million are in South Asia, he said.

“We are talking about (people) earning below $1.90 a day… where basically your life is in danger because, when you have this type of poverty and you cannot eat, you will die,” Debucquet told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “This will affect the urban poor much more. In the last couple of decades, we have seen very fast urbanization in these two regions.”

“I’m afraid of getting sick, and I’m afraid of starving.”

Thandi Lebho, 39, lives in the South African township of Diepsloot. She and her husband and three children have been waiting for food donations for three weeks. They haven’t been able to get what they need since South Africa’s lockdown began and her income from selling tupperware containers dried up.

“I’ve registered online and by phone, and I write on the papers from the street, and I came here at the clinic and registered, but nothing happened,” she tells CBS News. When she manages to get to the food distribution truck, it’s already run out of supplies.

“The kids are not going to school and education is going low. We are struggling to get money because I’m working for myself. I’m self-employed – so my business is in my house – so I’m not earning anything now,” she says. “I’m starving now. I don’t have anything.” 

She’ll be back in the food line tomorrow, trying to get something to keep her family going.

“I’m afraid of getting sick, and I’m afraid of starving,” she says.

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Coronavirus In L.A. County: Confirmed Cases Continue To Climb – Deadline

May 2nd, 2020

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health confirmed 38 more deaths and 691 additional cases of coronavirus on Saturday.

Twenty-eight of the people who died were over age 65, seven were between the ages of 41 to 65 years old, and one person who died was between the ages of 18 and 40 years old, health officials said. Two of the deaths were reported in the city of Pasadena. The new numbers bring the county’s totals to 24,894 cases and 1,209 deaths.

“For those of you who are grieving a loved one lost to COVID-19, we are so sorry for your loss,” Dr. Barbara Ferrer, the county’s public health director, said in a statement. “As we plan for L.A. County’s recovery phase, we are mapping a path forward that allows us to appropriately acknowledge the very real risks of COVID-19 and together, do everything possible to continue to slow the spread and save lives.”

Ferrer noted that there have been 182 confirmed cases among the county’s homeless population, with the majority of them occurring among people who spent time at the Union Rescue Mission on Skid Row in downtown L.A., where an outbreak was confirmed last month.

She also said there have been 106 pregnant women in the county have tested positive for COVID-19.

Los Angeles County continues to represent about half of the cases and deaths across the state. Officials in Sacramento reported Saturday that the state had 52,197 cases and 2,171 deaths.

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Death from covid-19 made me understand empathy – The – The Washington Post

May 2nd, 2020

But now all of that has changed for me.

It’s not just that my hospital clerkships have been changed into online electives. I wish it were only that.

On April 3, my grandfather died of covid-19.

He was the last of my grandparents still living, and we were close. His name was John Diaz. Growing up, I called him “Mydada,” and over the past few years, “JD.”

He was 82 and eccentric. A native New Yorker and an engineer by trade, he lived in Philadelphia and achieved success in his field, but his heart was in the arts — theater, literature, visual arts, ballet and music. His favorite, I think, was theater; in his spare time, he acted in community theater productions, and his obituary in the Philadelphia Inquirer paid tribute to his “resonating stage voice and . . . dashing physical presence.” But literature and reading were a close second.

I think of how, immediately upon seeing me, he’d always hand me a new book to read, good-naturedly saying, “Here’s your assignment,” so that we could discuss it later over the phone. Sometimes the book was a classic read like “Brave New World,” but more often it was a secondhand edition of an out-of-print book on byzantine languages, or an autobiography written by the obscure dictator of a small island nation. He loved learning, continuing to take college classes well into his later years, and I think this was his way of trying to pass it along.

I knew that my grandfather’s chronic obstructive pulmonary disease would put him at high risk of complications or death if he were to catch the virus, but I still couldn’t imagine that he might actually be affected. It was truly too scary to think about.

As a medical student, I’ve absorbed many lessons in empathy. Still, it took this deep personal loss to fully bring home to me the pandemic’s effects. Now I understand much more clearly what I saw months ago in the videos from China, which showed doctors dying of the virus and lockdowns choking off normal life. Now I also can feel, in a visceral way, the pain, fear and grief that the people in those videos must have felt.

I know that countless others now share this massively heightened sense of urgency about the coronavirus. But I keep wondering what factors blunted our awareness at first. I’ve concluded that a major deficiency in our country’s early response was a lack of empathy.

It seems to me, looking at the big picture, that the defining response in the United States was an inability to put ourselves in the shoes of someone else who lived across the globe.

What if we’d imagined ourselves living the plight of Chinese residents trapped in Wuhan during the first stages of the pandemic, or of the Italian doctors forced to triage ventilators and deny them to people over a certain age? Might a deeper sense of empathy and urgency actually have led us to put together a response that was more pragmatic, and more effective?

If we had recognized the events in other countries, felt their pain and heeded their warnings, and then responded proactively with testing and other preparations, as did South Korea and Singapore, I believe that we could have achieved immensely better results than what we’re now seeing, with our hospitals and clinicians overwhelmed, and countless people who like me are grieving for lost loved ones.

Amid this crisis, I believe that we as a nation need to choose between two conflicting impulses: to turn inward and blame “outsiders” for our current troubles; or to come together as a member of the global community and to reach out and embrace the experiences of other people in other nations, through empathy and compassion.

For me, the choice seems clear. I keep coming back to Benjamin Franklin’s maxim “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” I believe that an ounce of empathy could have been — and in many states in the country might still be — our best method of prevention.

I can’t help thinking that, if we had exercised that kind of empathy and had prepared better for the pandemic, I might still have my grandfather with me today.

William Liakos is a third-year medical student at Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell in Hempstead, N.Y. This article originally appeared on Pulse — Voices From the Heart of Medicine, which publishes personal accounts of illness and healing.

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Samsung Galaxy A51 now available in the US through AT&T and Xfinity Mobile – GSMArena.com news – GSMArena.com

May 2nd, 2020