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Quebec leads the way as provinces begin to re-emerge from coronavirus lockdown – The Globe and Mail

May 4th, 2020

A pedestrian walks down a near empty Sainte-Catherine street in Montreal, on May 4, 2020. The Quebec government announced that the reopening of retail stores in the greater Montreal area will be delayed by a week, until the week of May 18th.

Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press

Quebec stores outside the Montreal region reopened Monday as the province began the first phase of its controversial relaunch plan, even while announcing a one-week delay for the city where COVID-19 continues to kill scores of people every day.

Premier François Legault said the situation in Quebec is under control, but Montreal lacks hospital capacity for COVID-19 patients to open stores and some other businesses by the original May 11 opening date. The Montreal region will now wait at least until May 18, but the ambitious plan to open elementary schools, daycares, stores, construction sites and factories over the next three weeks remains intact.

“We want to reopen stores in Montreal, but we know when we do we will have more cases in Montreal,” Mr. Legault said. “If we open things up a bit, we need to have a margin [in hospital capacity] we don’t see right now.”

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COVID-19 has hit the province harder than other areas of the country, and Quebec’s Director of Public Health, Dr. Horacio Arruda, has called the fast-paced plan a calculated risk. Most other provinces are taking a more tentative approach.

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Quebec delays reopening of retail stores in Montreal by one week

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Quebec has 22,765 active COVID-19 cases and 2,280 deaths, but the rate of infection varies widely across the province. Almost 90 per cent of deaths have taken place in the Montreal region. Montreal has 804 cases per 100,000 people compared with 101 cases per 100,000 in the province outside the city and its suburbs. The number of people admitted to hospitals is still growing, with 1,772 people in the facilities, mostly in the Montreal region.

In Canada’s nine other provinces, which have fewer cases combined than Quebec, the COVID-19 outlook looked less daunting as businesses begin to reopen.

Ontario opened garden centres for curbside delivery Monday, along with landscapers, car washes and car dealerships (by appointment only). Premier Doug Ford said other businesses that could reopen for curbside pickup only would be released this week. The province also expanded its list of essential construction projects to include shipping, municipal projects, schools and daycares, as well as preparation for industrial work.

The Prairie provinces reopened medical services, such as dental and physiotherapy offices. Saskatchewan and Manitoba added some retail and low-risk recreational activities such as golfing. Manitoba also added campgrounds, restaurant patios and day camps to its approved list.

British Columbia will announce its relaunch plan Wednesday.

In Quebec, Anick Lessard went to the Aubainerie clothing store in Saint-Jérôme, 60 kilometres north of Montreal, to shop for her children, aged 16, 9 and 7. She pointed out that it was winter when the lockdown started. “I’m dressing the kids for spring and summer. I’ve shopped online but things like sandals and shoes don’t work as well,” Ms. Lessard said, adding that she felt safe with security measures in place.

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Ms. Lessard stood in line for 25 minutes before entering the store, where she sanitized her hands at the store’s compulsory cleaning station. The change rooms were closed and extra security monitored the entrance, hand-sanitizing and physical distancing. Employees wore masks and cashiers stood behind plastic shields.

Store manager Caroline Provost said the lineup persisted all day. “It’s like a Boxing Day,” Ms. Provost said, adding that most customers seemed to be stocking up on children’s clothing. “There seems to be a lot of couples with small children,” she said. “I’m not sure why one wouldn’t stay home with the baby. It’s a bit stressful for everyone, but everyone is respectful and it’s going well.”

Michel Kirallah, the owner of a shoe shop in Rimouski, 540 kilometres northeast of Montreal, was only allowing two customers in at a time. He and two employees were busy enough that he didn’t have time for lunch Monday. The region has the lowest infection rate in Quebec outside the far north. “We were actually happy with the lockdown because we managed to avoid the worst of the virus,” he said, describing the steady stream of customers Monday as “typical for a busy spring day.”

Not all Quebec businesses were rushing to open. Simons, the Quebec clothing store chain, has pushed back opening stores to May 19 out of caution.

Many other provinces, meanwhile, were still weighing options and watching Quebec.

Alberta set a target of May 14 for reopening a host of retail and personal service businesses, such as hairstyling, but it hinges on disease indicators to confirm they are trending in the right direction.

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In British Columbia, Health Minister Adrian Dix and Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said the province has flattened the spread of the disease and new rules coming this week need to reflect that reality. B.C. has closed many non-essential businesses, restricted public gatherings to 50 people, limited travel and suspended classroom instruction at schools and universities.

Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health, Eileen de Villa, sounded caution about quick reopening. With new infections in Toronto doubling every seven days, along with rising hospital admissions and now 449 deaths, she said Toronto has likely not passed its infection peak.

“I know it is also difficult to see other cities starting to relax restrictions,” Dr. de Villa said. “We all want to get back to enjoying our city. The reality is that COVID-19 does not impact all communities in the same way.”

With reports from Laura Stone and Jeff Gray in Toronto and Ian Bailey and Mike Hager in Vancouver.

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Second wave of coronavirus is “very likely,” doctor warns – CBS News

May 4th, 2020

As states begin to reopen and social distancing rules are relaxed, public health officials are warning about a possible second wave of coronavirus cases later this year. Dr. Shoshana Ungerleider, an internal medicine physician at Sutter Health in San Francisco, said Monday on CBSN that public health officials agree another round of cases is “very, very likely to happen.” 

Ungerleider said a potential second wave coinciding with flu season could cause a lot of confusion due to the overlap in symptoms between the viruses. “This may put a heavy strain on an already taxed healthcare system, so I think we need to be preparing for this now,” Ungerleider said. 

The lag time between infection and symptoms could also cause an increase in cases in the U.S. as social distancing rules are relaxed. “City and state officials, as well as the public, need to prepare and to understand that places may need to quickly reissue stay-at-home orders if in fact these local outbreaks start occurring,” Ungerleider said. “We need to continue focusing on expanding testing and contact tracing.”

Ungerleider said that since the novel coronavirus is only 16 weeks old, there’s a lot we don’t know yet. “People need to be aware that this virus has not gone away and people need to remain vigilant,” she said.

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France’s first known Covid-19 case ‘was in December’ – FRANCE 24 English

May 4th, 2020

Issued on: 05/05/2020 – 03:08

A French hospital which has retested old samples from pneumonia patients discovered that it treated a man who had Covid-19 as early as Dec. 27, nearly a month before the French government confirmed its first cases.

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Yves Cohen, head of resuscitation at the Avicenne and Jean Verdier hospitals in the northern suburbs of Paris, told French media that scientists had retested samples from 24 patients treated in December and January who tested negative for the flu.

“Of the 24, we had one who was positive for Covid-19 on Dec. 27,” he told the news channel on Sunday.

The samples had all initially been collected to detect flu using PCR tests, the same genetic screening process that can also be used to detect the presence of the novel coronavirus in patients infected at the time the sample is collected.

Each sample was retested several times to ensure there were no errors, he added. Neither Cohen nor his team were immediately available for comment on Monday.

France, which has seen almost 25,000 people die from the virus since March 1, confirmed its first three COVID-19 cases on Jan. 24, including two patients in Paris and another in the southwestern city of Bordeaux.

Cohen said it was too early to know if the patient whose Dec. 27 test was Covid-19 positive is France’s “patient zero”. Knowing who was the first is critical to understanding how the virus spread.

Cohen said the patient had survived and that a first investigation to trace the first contamination has been carried out.

“He was sick for 15 days and infected his two children, but not his wife, who works in a supermarket.

“He was amazed, he didn’t understand how he had been infected. We put the puzzle together and he had not made any trips. The only contact that he had was with his wife.”

The man’s wife worked alongside a Sushi stand, close to colleagues of Chinese origin, Cohen said. It was not clear whether those colleagues had travelled to China, and the local health authority should investigate, he said.

“We’re wondering whether she was asymptomatic,” he said.

“He may be the ‘patient zero’, but perhaps there are others in other regions. All the negative PCRs for pneumonia must be tested again. The virus was probably circulating (then),” he said.

(REUTERS)

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Super Mario 64 Has Been “Ported” To The PC – Kotaku

May 4th, 2020

French hospital discovers it treated coronavirus patient in December – msnNOW

May 4th, 2020

Slideshow by photo services

A French hospital has determined it treated a patient with COVID-19 in December, nearly a month before the nation confirmed its first infection, a doctor told a French news outlet.

While retesting old samples, the hospital discovered a pneumonia patient who was positive for the coronavirus as early as Dec. 27, Yves Cohen, head of resuscitation at the Avicenne and Jean Verdier hospitals in Paris, told BFM TV, according to The Guardian.  

Bing COVID-19 tracker: Latest numbers by country and state 

Cohen said it was too early to say whether the man treated in December was “patient zero” for France. The man survived after being sick for 15 days, and officials have launched a tracing investigation.

He had infected his two children but not his wife, who works at a sushi stand at a supermarket along side colleagues of Chinese origin. The patient had not traveled abroad, but it is unclear if his wife’s coworkers traveled to China, according to The Guardian. 

“We’re wondering whether she was asymptomatic,” Cohen said. “He may be the ‘patient zero’, but perhaps there are others in other regions. All the negative PCRs for pneumonia must be tested again. The virus was probably circulating,” he added, referring to a genetic screening test.

France first identified three cases of coronavirus on Jan. 24, with two in Paris and one in the city of Bordeaux.

As of Monday evening, France has confirmed at least 169,583 cases of coronavirus, leading to at least 25,204 deaths, according to data from Johns Hopkins University


a group of people walking down a sidewalk holding an umbrella: French hospital discovers it treated coronavirus patient in December
© Getty French hospital discovers it treated coronavirus patient in December

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Julia Roberts and More Stars Dress Up in Honor Of the 2020 Met Gala – E! NEWS

May 4th, 2020

All dressed up and nowhere to go!

Fashionistas know today is an extra special one—it’s the first Monday in May. The 2020 Met Gala would’ve taken place later tonight at the Metropolitan Museum of Art with the biggest celebrities showing up and showing out in their finest attire.

This year’s annual extravaganza also featured a delightful and divine theme: “About Time: Fashion and Duration.”

However, due to the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic, the Met Ball was postponed indefinitely. (insert several crying emojis.)

“Due to the unavoidable and responsible decision by the Metropolitan Museum to close its doors, About Time, and the opening night gala, will not take place on the date scheduled,” Anna Wintour said in a statement back in March. “In the meantime, we will give you a preview of this extraordinary exhibition in our forthcoming May issue.”

And since most ensembles were created way before the annual event got canceled, some stars are still getting glam and dressing up in honor of the 2020 Met Ball.

Because let’s be real: a damn good dress deserves to be seen.

Some celebs have showed off their lavish and elegant designs that they would’ve worn today, while others are recreating past lewks. Moreover, Vogue‘s “A Moment With the Met” is already live-streaming.

Cardi B, Florence Welsh and others have dressed to impress during the online special. 

So with that, see your fave stars get dolled up to celebrate the first Monday in May. Scroll through our gallery below!

Met Gala 2020, Julia Roberts, Instagram

Instagram

Met Gala 2020, Amanda Seyfried, Instagram

Instagram

A Moment with the MET, Cardi B

Mindy Kaling, Jared Leto, Met Gala

Getty Images; Instagram

Met Gala, Adam Rippon, Rihanna

Instagram / Lars Niki/Corbis via Getty Images

A Moment with the MET, Florence Welch

Priyanka Chopra, Instagram

Priyanka Chopra / Instagram

Watch E!’s The Met Gala: Ultimate Fashion Moments special tonight at 11 p.m., only on E!

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Musicians Who Have Opened Up About Their Mental Health Struggles – India Gone Viral

May 4th, 2020

For too long, many people have silently battled mental health issues, putting on a happy face for the rest of the world — including musicians.

But things have been changing. In recent years various artists have spoken out in the hopes of destigmatizing everything from depression to bipolar disorder and more by opening up about their own struggles. See what they’ve shared and said to encourage others.

May is Mental Health Month. If you or anyone you know is struggling with mental health or substance abuse disorders, reach out to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration‘s national helpline 24/7 at 1-800-662-HELP (4357) for confidential treatment referrals and information. For those who are experiencing suicidal thoughts and/or distress, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24/7 at 1-800-273-8255.


Adele

The Grammy-winning singer opened up about her postpartum depression in a 2016 Vanity Fair cover story when she explained why she was hesitant to have another child after welcoming son Angelo. “I’m too scared. I had really bad postpartum depression after I had my son, and it frightened me,” she said, noting that she did not take antidepressants.

“My knowledge of postpartum — or post-natal, as we call it in England — is that you don’t want to be with your child; you’re worried you might hurt your child; you’re worried you weren’t doing a good job. But I was obsessed with my child. I felt very inadequate; I felt like I’d made the worst decision of my life. … It can come in many different forms.”

Alanis Morissette

After welcoming her third child in 2019, the singer opened up about her struggle with postpartum depression in a post on her website. “I wasn’t sure if I would have post partum depression/anxiety this time around. Or, as I like to call it: post partum activity. Or, also: post partum tar-drenched trenches,” she wrote.

“Hormonal. Sleep deprivation. Fogginess. Physical pain. Isolation. Anxiety. Cortisol. Recovery from childbirth (as beautiful and intense as mine was at home, dream birth.), integrating new angel baby with older angel babies. Marriage. All kinds of PTSD triggers. … PPD is still a sneaky monkey with a machete.”

Ariana Grande

“I know those families and my fans, and everyone there experienced a tremendous amount of it as well. Time is the biggest thing. I feel like I shouldn’t even be talking about my own experience — like I shouldn’t even say anything. I don’t think I’ll ever know how to talk about it and not cry,” the pop star told British Vogue about suffering from PTSD after more than 20 people were killed in a bombing during one of her 2017 shows. “I’ve always had anxiety. I’ve never really spoken about it because I thought everyone had it, but when I got home from tour it was the most severe I think it’s ever been.”

Bebe Rexha

The singer told her fans via social media in 2019 that she had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. “For the longest time, I didn’t understand why I felt so sick. Why I felt lows that made me not want to leave my house or be around people and why I felt highs that wouldn’t let me sleep, wouldn’t let me stop working or creating music. Now I know why,” she wrote. “Honesty is a form of self love.”

Big Sean

The “Bounce Back” rapper nixed a North American tour in 2018, and later told Billboard it was a good move for him personally. “I never really took the time out to nurture myself, to take care of myself. It took me a lot of depression having a lot of anxiety to realize something was off,” he said. “I’ve been getting myself together, getting my mind right. So I have been taking better care of myself.”

Billie Eilish

The young superstar might be on top of the world professionally, but her newfound fame led to depression and suicidal thoughts, she told Gayle King ahead of the 2020 Grammy Awards. “I was so unhappy last year … I was so unhappy and I was so, like, joyless. I didn’t ever think I would be happy again, ever,” she said. “I don’t want to be too dark, but I genuinely didn’t think I would, like, make it to, like, 17.”

Bruce Springsteen

The musician shared with Esquire in 2018 that he had struggled with mental health issues, and how he’d had two emotional breakdowns. “I have come close enough to [mental illness] where I know I am not completely well myself,” said Springsteen, who also noted that his father was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia later in life.

“I’ve had to deal with a lot of it over the years, and I’m on a variety of medications that keep me on an even keel; otherwise I can swing rather dramatically and … just … the wheels can come off a little bit. So we have to watch, in our family. I have to watch my kids, and I’ve been lucky there. It ran in my family going way before my dad.”

Camila Cabello

“OCD is weird. I laugh about it now. … Everybody has different ways of handling stress. And, for me, if I get really stressed about something, I’ll start to have the same thought over and over again, and no matter how many times I get to the resolution, I feel like something bad is about to happen if I don’t keep thinking about it,” she told Cosmopolitan U.K. in 2018. “When I found out, and [learned] how to step back from it, it made me feel so much better. I feel so much more in control of it now.”

Charli XCX

While promoting her self-titled third album in 2019, the singer-songwriter opened up about her mental health. “[I go into] my thoughts and feelings about my mental state and what life is supposed to be as an artist, my depression, and my insecurities,” she told SPIN about using her music to candidly explore her mental health, and how that has impacted her record. “I’m being more honest than ever before. It’s been very therapeutic.”

Demi Lovato

Lovato revealed in a 2011 interview with Robin Roberts that she — then 18 years old — had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. “I had no idea that I was even bipolar until I went into treatment,” she said. “I was actually manic a lot of the times that I would take on workloads, and I would say, ‘Yes, I can do this, I can do this, I can do this.’ I was conquering the world, but then I would come crashing down, and I would be more depressed than ever.”

Since then, she’s used her platform to bring awareness to mental health issues by speaking with legislators on behalf of the Be Vocal: Speak Up About Mental Health initiative, and executive produced the 2017 documentary Beyond Silence, about three people’s experiences with mental illnesses.

Ed Sheeran

“I have social anxiety. I hate large groups of people, which is ironic, because I play shows for a living,” Sheeran told Charlamagne the God in a 2019 interview. “But I just feel claustrophobic and don’t like being around too many people.”

Elle King

The musician shared in a now-deleted 2017 Instagram post that she was suffering from PTSD and depression. A year later, after her marriage fell apart, she told People that she sought help from a specialist. “If I didn’t get help, I probably wouldn’t be … I don’t know. I don’t wanna think like that,” she said. “I think that reaching out saved my life. I don’t wanna think of any other outcome that could have happened. I feel like the more I talk about it, maybe it could reach somebody … reach somebody that feels alone.”

Ellie Goulding

“I started having panic attacks, and the scariest part was it could be triggered by anything. I used to cover my face with a pillow whenever I had to walk outside from the car to the studio. My new life as a pop star certainly wasn’t as glamorous as all my friends from home thought. Secretly, I was really struggling physically and emotionally,” the singer told Well + Good in 2017. “I still feel nervous before performing, or have pangs of anxiety from time to time, but it’s not crippling like it used to be.”

Halsey

The artist shared in Billboard’s March 2016 cover story that she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder while in high school, and spent weeks in a psychiatric hospital her senior year. “I had tried to kill myself,” said Halsey, who is also a mental health advocate. “I was an adolescent; I didn’t know what I was doing. Because I was 17, I was still in a children’s ward, which was terrifying.”

James Blake

“It’s especially easy to poke fun at the idea that a white man could be depressed. I have done it myself, as a straight white man who was depressed. In fact, I still carry the shame of having been a straight white man who’s depressed and has experienced suicidal thoughts,” the artist wrote in an essay in It’s Not OK to Feel Blue (and Other Lies). “I also believe everybody is entitled to pain, no matter how perceptibly or relatively small that pain is. I don’t want the shame around depression and anxiety in privileged people to become worse any more than I want it for the marginalized.”

Janet Jackson

“I struggled with depression. The struggle was intense … Low self-esteem might be rooted in childhood feelings of inferiority. It could relate to failing to meet impossibly high standards. And of course there are always the societal issues of racism and sexism,” the Grammy winner wrote in a 2018 issue of Essence. “Put it all together and depression is a tenacious and scary condition. Thankfully, I found my way through it.”

Julie Andrews

The celebrated star told Stephen Colbert in 2019 while promoting her memoir Home Work that she first sought therapy after she and Blake Edwards, her first husband, separated. “My head was so full of clutter and garbage,” she shared. “Believe it or not, it was [director] Mike Nichols who really tipped me into wanting to go to therapy because … he was so sane and so funny and clear. He had a clarity that I admired so much, and I wanted that for myself and I didn’t feel I had it. So I went and got into it, and it saved my life in a way.”

She later added about therapy: “These days, there’s no harm in sharing it. I think everybody knows the great work it can do. Anybody that is lucky enough to have it, afford it and take advantage of it, I think it would be wonderful.”

Justin Bieber

The “Sorry” singer was contrite in a lengthy 2019 Instagram message to his fans, apologizing for his wrongdoings. But he was also honest about his struggle with depression. “It’s hard to get out of bed in the morning … when it feels like there’s trouble after trouble after trouble,” he wrote. “You start foreseeing the day through lenses of ‘dread’ and anticipate another bad day. A cycle of feeling disappointment after disappointment. Sometimes it can even get to the point where you don’t even want to live anymore. Where you feel like it’s never going to change.”

Kanye West

The rapper and entrepreneur discussed his mental health in a 2018 interview with Big Boi, revealing that he wasn’t diagnosed with a “mental condition” until age 39. “I’m so blessed and so privileged because think about people that have mental issues that are not Kanye West, that can’t go and make that [album] and make you feel like it’s all good,” he said at the time, adding, “It’s not a disability, it’s a superpower.”

Katy Perry

“I have had bouts of situational depression and my heart was broken last year because, unknowingly, I put so much validity in the reaction of the public, and the public didn’t react in the way I had expected to … which broke my heart,” the pop star told Vogue Australia in 2018 of the reception to her album Witness.

Kendrick Lamar

When asked about the haunting lyrics on his song “U” off of 2015’s To Pimp a Butterfly, the rapper opened up to MTV about his fight against depression and suicidal thoughts. “I’ve pulled that song not only from previous experiences, but, I think my whole life, I think everything is drawn out of that,” Lamar explained.

“Nothing was as vulnerable as that record. So it’s even pulling from those experiences of coming up in Compton. It’s pulling from the experience of going through change and accepting change — that’s the hardest thing for man, accepting change.”

Kid Cudi

The rapper opened up about his struggle against depression with Billboard in 2016, saying, “I used drugs to try to fix my depression.” He added, “I have everything I ever dreamed of in terms of stability. But I hadn’t been living that reality, because depression was f–king me up.” A few months later, he revealed in a Facebook post that he had checked himself into a treatment center for depression and “suicidal urges.”

Kristen Bell

“For me, depression is not sadness. It’s not having a bad day and needing a hug. It gave me a complete and utter sense of isolation and loneliness. Its debilitation was all-consuming, and it shut down my mental circuit board. I felt worthless, like I had nothing to offer, like I was a failure,” the singer and actor wrote for Time magazine in 2016. “Now, after seeking help, I can see that those thoughts, of course, couldn’t have been more wrong. It’s important for me to be candid about this so people in a similar situation can realize that they are not worthless and that they do have something to offer. We all do.”

Lady Gaga

Gaga revealed in 2016 that she suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder. In an open letter on her Born This Way Foundation website, she shared: “I have wrestled for some time about when, how and if I should reveal my diagnosis of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). After five years of searching for the answers to my chronic pain and the change I have felt in my brain, I am finally well enough to tell you. There is a lot of shame attached to mental illness, but it’s important that you know that there is hope and a chance for recovery.”

Mother Monster also addressed mental health as she accepted the Global Changemakers Award in 2018: “I have struggled for a long time, both being public and not public about my mental health issues or my mental illness. But I truly believe that secrets keep you sick.”

Lizzo

“The day I released ‘Truth Hurts’ was probably one of the darkest days I’ve had ever in my career. I remember thinking, ‘If I quit music now, nobody would notice. This is my best song ever, and nobody cares.’ I was like, ‘F–k it, I’m done.’ And a lot of people rallied; my producer, my publicist and my family, they were like, ‘Just keep going because this is the darkest before the dawn,’” Lizzo told People in 2019. She added, “Reaching out to people when you’re depressed is really hard; I would shut myself away from friends and family. So I’ve been working on communicating with the people who love me.”

Logic

“The last two-and-a-half years were probably the hardest years of my life, mentally,” the rapper told Billboard in 2018. And ironically, his song “1-800-273-8255” — which is the number of the Suicide Prevention Lifeline — “led to depression,” he said. “Everywhere you go, the conversation is about suicide — wanting to kill yourself. Every interview, all the time, for a year straight.”

Mariah Carey

“Until recently I lived in denial and isolation and in constant fear someone would expose me. It was too heavy a burden to carry and I simply couldn’t do that anymore. I sought and received treatment, I put positive people around me and I got back to doing what I love — writing songs and making music,” she revealed to People in 2018 about her bipolar disorder II diagnosis, noting that for a while, she thought she had a bad sleep disorder instead.

Michelle Williams

Williams explained while co-hosting The Talk in 2017 that her depression was so bad while she was in Destiny’s Child that she was “suicidal.”

“For years I’m in one of the top-selling female groups of all time suffering with depression. When I disclosed it to our manager at the time — bless his heart — he was like, ‘Y’all just signed a multi-million dollar deal, you’re about to go on tour. What do you have to be depressed about?’” she revealed, saying that she wanted to share her struggle to “normalize” mental health issues. “I was to that place where it got so dark and heavy because sometimes you feel like ‘I’m the provider, I take care of people, I’m not supposed to be feeling this way — what do I do?’ I wanted out.”

Miley Cyrus

The star shared her battle against depression in her 2014 Elle cover story. “It’s more of an issue than people really want to talk about. Because people don’t know how to talk about being depressed — that it’s totally OK to feel sad. I went through a time where I was really depressed. Like, I locked myself in my room and my dad had to break my door down. It was a lot to do with, like, I had really bad skin, and I felt really bullied because of that. But I never was depressed because of the way someone else made me feel, I just was depressed,” she said.

“And every person can benefit from talking to somebody. … There’s not much that I’m closed off about, and the universe gave me all that so I could help people feel like they don’t have to be something they’re not or feel like they have to fake happy. There’s nothing worse than being fake happy.”

Naomi Judd

The country star opened up about her diagnosis of “severe depression” in a 2016 Good Morning America interview. “They see me in rhinestones, you know, with glitter in my hair, that really is who I am,” she said. “But then I would come home and not leave the house for three weeks, and not get out of my pajamas, and not practice normal hygiene. It was really bad.” Judd also shared that she had even been in a psychiatric ward a number of times tried different medications.

Nicki Minaj

Things were not good for Minaj prior to hitting it big, and she even considered suicide. “I kept having doors slammed on my face,” she told Cosmo in a 2011 interview. “I felt like nothing was working. I had moved out on my own, and here I was thinking I’d have to go home. It was one dead end after another. At one point, I was like, ‘What would happen if I just didn’t wake up?’ That’s how I felt. Like maybe I should just take my life?”

Noah Cyrus

The young performer opened up to James Corden in 2019. “I’ve struggled with anxiety or depression since I was 10 or 11 years old, so I think it’s a huge topic. One of the things I’ve always wanted to use this platform [for] is to talk about my mental health and help young adults all around America and everywhere in the world know they’re not alone,” she revealed as she discussed her work with the Jed Foundation, a non-profit that works to prevent teen suicides and protect emotional health.

“It’s just something that I’ve always wanted to use as my platform for something good, and all the anxieties that I have, use it for good and not evil. I don’t want it to take over my life like it has been for all of these years.”

Pete Wentz

“My highs, my happiness are really high and my lows are very low and I’m not able to regulate between the two,” the Fall Out Boy bassist told Howard Stern in 2015 of his struggle with bipolar disorder. “Through actual therapy and having kids, it’s way more under control, and something I can see when I’m on the roller coaster and control it more.”

Pink

The singer opened up to TODAY‘s Carson Daly in 2019 about mental health and trying to raise a family when they live a very unconventional life due to her and husband Carey Hart’s celebrity status. “I’ve been depressed; I have anxiety. I overthink everything,” she told Daly, noting that she and her husband also go to counseling sessions. “I think talking about (mental health) is the most important thing,” Pink said. “I’m hopeful that the taboo of it is all going away because more and more people are talking about it.”

Rachel Bloom

The Crazy Ex-Girlfriend co-creator and star shared in a 2016 Glamour interview that her struggle started with one sleepless night before a big pitch meeting, which then spiraled into ongoing anxiety and “the worst depression” of her life. She had gone to therapists, but eventually saw a psychiatrist: “He diagnosed me with low-grade depression and put me on a small amount of Prozac.”

Rick Springfield

The “Jessie’s Girl” singer opened up about his struggle with depression in his 2010 memoir, Late, Late at Night, revealing a suicide attempt at age 16 when he tried to hang himself. “Having suicide ride on my shoulders was not a lot of fun through a lot of my life and surviving that was a real high point for me,” the musician told Reuters. “Once puberty hit, I was pretty much skimming along the bottom, and I am (now) living long enough to understand how to deal with it.”

Ryan Tedder

The OneRepublic frontman revealed in a lengthy Facebook post in 2017 that he had been suffering from “crippling anxiety” that almost led him to quit the group. He shared that after the release of Oh My My, “I was on the verge of a nervous breakdown, not sleeping, on meds, not happy, anxiety on a crippling level and it was triggered from sheer exhaustion,” also noting that his anxiety made him want to stop writing music.

Selena Gomez

The pop star announced in 2016 that she was taking a break after suffering from mental health issues due to lupus. “As many of you know, around a year ago I revealed that I have lupus, an illness that can affect people in different ways,” she told People. “I’ve discovered that anxiety, panic attacks and depression can be side effects of lupus, which can present their own challenges.”

Shawn Mendes

“It was kind of something that hit me last year,” the singer shared with Zane Lowe in 2018 about his struggle with anxiety. “Growing up, I was a pretty calm kid. I knew people who suffered from anxiety, found it kind of hard to understand, and then when it hits you, you’re like, ‘Oh my god, this is crazy.’”

Sinead O’Connor

The singer reportedly scrapped her plans to tour in 2012 due to bipolar disorder. “As you all know I had a very serious breakdown between December and March and I had been advised by my doctor not to go on tour but didn’t want to ‘fail’ or let anyone down as the tour was already booked to coincide with album release,” she reportedly wrote on her website at the time in a since-deleted post. “So very stupidly I ignored his advice to my great detriment, attempting to be stronger than I actually am. I apologise (sic) sincerely for any difficulties this may cause.”

In August 2017, O’Connor shared emotional and troubling videos about living with mental illness. “Mental illness is a bit like drugs. It doesn’t give a s–t who you are. Equally you know what’s worse is the stigma who doesn’t give a s–t who you are,” she said in the first video, before noting in another the next day that she was suicidal.

Zayn Malik

The former One Direction member had canceled performances in the past due to his anxiety, and penned a piece about his struggle for Time in 2016. “Anxiety is nothing to be ashamed of; it affects millions of people every day,” he wrote. “When I was in One Direction, my anxiety issues were huge but, within the safety net of the band, they were at least manageable. As a solo performer, I felt much more exposed, and the psychological stress of performing had just gotten to be too much for me to handle — at that moment, at least. Rather than hiding away, sugar-coating it, I knew I had to put it all out there.”

Zendaya

“I used to struggle with anxiety pretty bad. It only happened when I sang live, not when I danced or did any other live performances, and it stemmed from a bad experience I had while singing on The Ellen DeGeneres Show in 2013. It wasn’t my best performance and I’ve never let myself live that down. I had mad anxiety ever since that,” the singer and actress revealed in a 2017 post on her app.

“I DID figure out how to bury my anxiety, though. I’ve tried focusing my energy on other things, like making movies. And I took my time and slowly built my confidence back up before I went back out on stage to sing live.”

Uncategorized

Musicians Who Have Opened Up About Their Mental Health Struggles – India Gone Viral

May 4th, 2020

For too long, many people have silently battled mental health issues, putting on a happy face for the rest of the world — including musicians.

But things have been changing. In recent years various artists have spoken out in the hopes of destigmatizing everything from depression to bipolar disorder and more by opening up about their own struggles. See what they’ve shared and said to encourage others.

May is Mental Health Month. If you or anyone you know is struggling with mental health or substance abuse disorders, reach out to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration‘s national helpline 24/7 at 1-800-662-HELP (4357) for confidential treatment referrals and information. For those who are experiencing suicidal thoughts and/or distress, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24/7 at 1-800-273-8255.


Adele

The Grammy-winning singer opened up about her postpartum depression in a 2016 Vanity Fair cover story when she explained why she was hesitant to have another child after welcoming son Angelo. “I’m too scared. I had really bad postpartum depression after I had my son, and it frightened me,” she said, noting that she did not take antidepressants.

“My knowledge of postpartum — or post-natal, as we call it in England — is that you don’t want to be with your child; you’re worried you might hurt your child; you’re worried you weren’t doing a good job. But I was obsessed with my child. I felt very inadequate; I felt like I’d made the worst decision of my life. … It can come in many different forms.”

Alanis Morissette

After welcoming her third child in 2019, the singer opened up about her struggle with postpartum depression in a post on her website. “I wasn’t sure if I would have post partum depression/anxiety this time around. Or, as I like to call it: post partum activity. Or, also: post partum tar-drenched trenches,” she wrote.

“Hormonal. Sleep deprivation. Fogginess. Physical pain. Isolation. Anxiety. Cortisol. Recovery from childbirth (as beautiful and intense as mine was at home, dream birth.), integrating new angel baby with older angel babies. Marriage. All kinds of PTSD triggers. … PPD is still a sneaky monkey with a machete.”

Ariana Grande

“I know those families and my fans, and everyone there experienced a tremendous amount of it as well. Time is the biggest thing. I feel like I shouldn’t even be talking about my own experience — like I shouldn’t even say anything. I don’t think I’ll ever know how to talk about it and not cry,” the pop star told British Vogue about suffering from PTSD after more than 20 people were killed in a bombing during one of her 2017 shows. “I’ve always had anxiety. I’ve never really spoken about it because I thought everyone had it, but when I got home from tour it was the most severe I think it’s ever been.”

Bebe Rexha

The singer told her fans via social media in 2019 that she had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. “For the longest time, I didn’t understand why I felt so sick. Why I felt lows that made me not want to leave my house or be around people and why I felt highs that wouldn’t let me sleep, wouldn’t let me stop working or creating music. Now I know why,” she wrote. “Honesty is a form of self love.”

Big Sean

The “Bounce Back” rapper nixed a North American tour in 2018, and later told Billboard it was a good move for him personally. “I never really took the time out to nurture myself, to take care of myself. It took me a lot of depression having a lot of anxiety to realize something was off,” he said. “I’ve been getting myself together, getting my mind right. So I have been taking better care of myself.”

Billie Eilish

The young superstar might be on top of the world professionally, but her newfound fame led to depression and suicidal thoughts, she told Gayle King ahead of the 2020 Grammy Awards. “I was so unhappy last year … I was so unhappy and I was so, like, joyless. I didn’t ever think I would be happy again, ever,” she said. “I don’t want to be too dark, but I genuinely didn’t think I would, like, make it to, like, 17.”

Bruce Springsteen

The musician shared with Esquire in 2018 that he had struggled with mental health issues, and how he’d had two emotional breakdowns. “I have come close enough to [mental illness] where I know I am not completely well myself,” said Springsteen, who also noted that his father was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia later in life.

“I’ve had to deal with a lot of it over the years, and I’m on a variety of medications that keep me on an even keel; otherwise I can swing rather dramatically and … just … the wheels can come off a little bit. So we have to watch, in our family. I have to watch my kids, and I’ve been lucky there. It ran in my family going way before my dad.”

Camila Cabello

“OCD is weird. I laugh about it now. … Everybody has different ways of handling stress. And, for me, if I get really stressed about something, I’ll start to have the same thought over and over again, and no matter how many times I get to the resolution, I feel like something bad is about to happen if I don’t keep thinking about it,” she told Cosmopolitan U.K. in 2018. “When I found out, and [learned] how to step back from it, it made me feel so much better. I feel so much more in control of it now.”

Charli XCX

While promoting her self-titled third album in 2019, the singer-songwriter opened up about her mental health. “[I go into] my thoughts and feelings about my mental state and what life is supposed to be as an artist, my depression, and my insecurities,” she told SPIN about using her music to candidly explore her mental health, and how that has impacted her record. “I’m being more honest than ever before. It’s been very therapeutic.”

Demi Lovato

Lovato revealed in a 2011 interview with Robin Roberts that she — then 18 years old — had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. “I had no idea that I was even bipolar until I went into treatment,” she said. “I was actually manic a lot of the times that I would take on workloads, and I would say, ‘Yes, I can do this, I can do this, I can do this.’ I was conquering the world, but then I would come crashing down, and I would be more depressed than ever.”

Since then, she’s used her platform to bring awareness to mental health issues by speaking with legislators on behalf of the Be Vocal: Speak Up About Mental Health initiative, and executive produced the 2017 documentary Beyond Silence, about three people’s experiences with mental illnesses.

Ed Sheeran

“I have social anxiety. I hate large groups of people, which is ironic, because I play shows for a living,” Sheeran told Charlamagne the God in a 2019 interview. “But I just feel claustrophobic and don’t like being around too many people.”

Elle King

The musician shared in a now-deleted 2017 Instagram post that she was suffering from PTSD and depression. A year later, after her marriage fell apart, she told People that she sought help from a specialist. “If I didn’t get help, I probably wouldn’t be … I don’t know. I don’t wanna think like that,” she said. “I think that reaching out saved my life. I don’t wanna think of any other outcome that could have happened. I feel like the more I talk about it, maybe it could reach somebody … reach somebody that feels alone.”

Ellie Goulding

“I started having panic attacks, and the scariest part was it could be triggered by anything. I used to cover my face with a pillow whenever I had to walk outside from the car to the studio. My new life as a pop star certainly wasn’t as glamorous as all my friends from home thought. Secretly, I was really struggling physically and emotionally,” the singer told Well + Good in 2017. “I still feel nervous before performing, or have pangs of anxiety from time to time, but it’s not crippling like it used to be.”

Halsey

The artist shared in Billboard’s March 2016 cover story that she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder while in high school, and spent weeks in a psychiatric hospital her senior year. “I had tried to kill myself,” said Halsey, who is also a mental health advocate. “I was an adolescent; I didn’t know what I was doing. Because I was 17, I was still in a children’s ward, which was terrifying.”

James Blake

“It’s especially easy to poke fun at the idea that a white man could be depressed. I have done it myself, as a straight white man who was depressed. In fact, I still carry the shame of having been a straight white man who’s depressed and has experienced suicidal thoughts,” the artist wrote in an essay in It’s Not OK to Feel Blue (and Other Lies). “I also believe everybody is entitled to pain, no matter how perceptibly or relatively small that pain is. I don’t want the shame around depression and anxiety in privileged people to become worse any more than I want it for the marginalized.”

Janet Jackson

“I struggled with depression. The struggle was intense … Low self-esteem might be rooted in childhood feelings of inferiority. It could relate to failing to meet impossibly high standards. And of course there are always the societal issues of racism and sexism,” the Grammy winner wrote in a 2018 issue of Essence. “Put it all together and depression is a tenacious and scary condition. Thankfully, I found my way through it.”

Julie Andrews

The celebrated star told Stephen Colbert in 2019 while promoting her memoir Home Work that she first sought therapy after she and Blake Edwards, her first husband, separated. “My head was so full of clutter and garbage,” she shared. “Believe it or not, it was [director] Mike Nichols who really tipped me into wanting to go to therapy because … he was so sane and so funny and clear. He had a clarity that I admired so much, and I wanted that for myself and I didn’t feel I had it. So I went and got into it, and it saved my life in a way.”

She later added about therapy: “These days, there’s no harm in sharing it. I think everybody knows the great work it can do. Anybody that is lucky enough to have it, afford it and take advantage of it, I think it would be wonderful.”

Justin Bieber

The “Sorry” singer was contrite in a lengthy 2019 Instagram message to his fans, apologizing for his wrongdoings. But he was also honest about his struggle with depression. “It’s hard to get out of bed in the morning … when it feels like there’s trouble after trouble after trouble,” he wrote. “You start foreseeing the day through lenses of ‘dread’ and anticipate another bad day. A cycle of feeling disappointment after disappointment. Sometimes it can even get to the point where you don’t even want to live anymore. Where you feel like it’s never going to change.”

Kanye West

The rapper and entrepreneur discussed his mental health in a 2018 interview with Big Boi, revealing that he wasn’t diagnosed with a “mental condition” until age 39. “I’m so blessed and so privileged because think about people that have mental issues that are not Kanye West, that can’t go and make that [album] and make you feel like it’s all good,” he said at the time, adding, “It’s not a disability, it’s a superpower.”

Katy Perry

“I have had bouts of situational depression and my heart was broken last year because, unknowingly, I put so much validity in the reaction of the public, and the public didn’t react in the way I had expected to … which broke my heart,” the pop star told Vogue Australia in 2018 of the reception to her album Witness.

Kendrick Lamar

When asked about the haunting lyrics on his song “U” off of 2015’s To Pimp a Butterfly, the rapper opened up to MTV about his fight against depression and suicidal thoughts. “I’ve pulled that song not only from previous experiences, but, I think my whole life, I think everything is drawn out of that,” Lamar explained.

“Nothing was as vulnerable as that record. So it’s even pulling from those experiences of coming up in Compton. It’s pulling from the experience of going through change and accepting change — that’s the hardest thing for man, accepting change.”

Kid Cudi

The rapper opened up about his struggle against depression with Billboard in 2016, saying, “I used drugs to try to fix my depression.” He added, “I have everything I ever dreamed of in terms of stability. But I hadn’t been living that reality, because depression was f–king me up.” A few months later, he revealed in a Facebook post that he had checked himself into a treatment center for depression and “suicidal urges.”

Kristen Bell

“For me, depression is not sadness. It’s not having a bad day and needing a hug. It gave me a complete and utter sense of isolation and loneliness. Its debilitation was all-consuming, and it shut down my mental circuit board. I felt worthless, like I had nothing to offer, like I was a failure,” the singer and actor wrote for Time magazine in 2016. “Now, after seeking help, I can see that those thoughts, of course, couldn’t have been more wrong. It’s important for me to be candid about this so people in a similar situation can realize that they are not worthless and that they do have something to offer. We all do.”

Lady Gaga

Gaga revealed in 2016 that she suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder. In an open letter on her Born This Way Foundation website, she shared: “I have wrestled for some time about when, how and if I should reveal my diagnosis of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). After five years of searching for the answers to my chronic pain and the change I have felt in my brain, I am finally well enough to tell you. There is a lot of shame attached to mental illness, but it’s important that you know that there is hope and a chance for recovery.”

Mother Monster also addressed mental health as she accepted the Global Changemakers Award in 2018: “I have struggled for a long time, both being public and not public about my mental health issues or my mental illness. But I truly believe that secrets keep you sick.”

Lizzo

“The day I released ‘Truth Hurts’ was probably one of the darkest days I’ve had ever in my career. I remember thinking, ‘If I quit music now, nobody would notice. This is my best song ever, and nobody cares.’ I was like, ‘F–k it, I’m done.’ And a lot of people rallied; my producer, my publicist and my family, they were like, ‘Just keep going because this is the darkest before the dawn,’” Lizzo told People in 2019. She added, “Reaching out to people when you’re depressed is really hard; I would shut myself away from friends and family. So I’ve been working on communicating with the people who love me.”

Logic

“The last two-and-a-half years were probably the hardest years of my life, mentally,” the rapper told Billboard in 2018. And ironically, his song “1-800-273-8255” — which is the number of the Suicide Prevention Lifeline — “led to depression,” he said. “Everywhere you go, the conversation is about suicide — wanting to kill yourself. Every interview, all the time, for a year straight.”

Mariah Carey

“Until recently I lived in denial and isolation and in constant fear someone would expose me. It was too heavy a burden to carry and I simply couldn’t do that anymore. I sought and received treatment, I put positive people around me and I got back to doing what I love — writing songs and making music,” she revealed to People in 2018 about her bipolar disorder II diagnosis, noting that for a while, she thought she had a bad sleep disorder instead.

Michelle Williams

Williams explained while co-hosting The Talk in 2017 that her depression was so bad while she was in Destiny’s Child that she was “suicidal.”

“For years I’m in one of the top-selling female groups of all time suffering with depression. When I disclosed it to our manager at the time — bless his heart — he was like, ‘Y’all just signed a multi-million dollar deal, you’re about to go on tour. What do you have to be depressed about?’” she revealed, saying that she wanted to share her struggle to “normalize” mental health issues. “I was to that place where it got so dark and heavy because sometimes you feel like ‘I’m the provider, I take care of people, I’m not supposed to be feeling this way — what do I do?’ I wanted out.”

Miley Cyrus

The star shared her battle against depression in her 2014 Elle cover story. “It’s more of an issue than people really want to talk about. Because people don’t know how to talk about being depressed — that it’s totally OK to feel sad. I went through a time where I was really depressed. Like, I locked myself in my room and my dad had to break my door down. It was a lot to do with, like, I had really bad skin, and I felt really bullied because of that. But I never was depressed because of the way someone else made me feel, I just was depressed,” she said.

“And every person can benefit from talking to somebody. … There’s not much that I’m closed off about, and the universe gave me all that so I could help people feel like they don’t have to be something they’re not or feel like they have to fake happy. There’s nothing worse than being fake happy.”

Naomi Judd

The country star opened up about her diagnosis of “severe depression” in a 2016 Good Morning America interview. “They see me in rhinestones, you know, with glitter in my hair, that really is who I am,” she said. “But then I would come home and not leave the house for three weeks, and not get out of my pajamas, and not practice normal hygiene. It was really bad.” Judd also shared that she had even been in a psychiatric ward a number of times tried different medications.

Nicki Minaj

Things were not good for Minaj prior to hitting it big, and she even considered suicide. “I kept having doors slammed on my face,” she told Cosmo in a 2011 interview. “I felt like nothing was working. I had moved out on my own, and here I was thinking I’d have to go home. It was one dead end after another. At one point, I was like, ‘What would happen if I just didn’t wake up?’ That’s how I felt. Like maybe I should just take my life?”

Noah Cyrus

The young performer opened up to James Corden in 2019. “I’ve struggled with anxiety or depression since I was 10 or 11 years old, so I think it’s a huge topic. One of the things I’ve always wanted to use this platform [for] is to talk about my mental health and help young adults all around America and everywhere in the world know they’re not alone,” she revealed as she discussed her work with the Jed Foundation, a non-profit that works to prevent teen suicides and protect emotional health.

“It’s just something that I’ve always wanted to use as my platform for something good, and all the anxieties that I have, use it for good and not evil. I don’t want it to take over my life like it has been for all of these years.”

Pete Wentz

“My highs, my happiness are really high and my lows are very low and I’m not able to regulate between the two,” the Fall Out Boy bassist told Howard Stern in 2015 of his struggle with bipolar disorder. “Through actual therapy and having kids, it’s way more under control, and something I can see when I’m on the roller coaster and control it more.”

Pink

The singer opened up to TODAY‘s Carson Daly in 2019 about mental health and trying to raise a family when they live a very unconventional life due to her and husband Carey Hart’s celebrity status. “I’ve been depressed; I have anxiety. I overthink everything,” she told Daly, noting that she and her husband also go to counseling sessions. “I think talking about (mental health) is the most important thing,” Pink said. “I’m hopeful that the taboo of it is all going away because more and more people are talking about it.”

Rachel Bloom

The Crazy Ex-Girlfriend co-creator and star shared in a 2016 Glamour interview that her struggle started with one sleepless night before a big pitch meeting, which then spiraled into ongoing anxiety and “the worst depression” of her life. She had gone to therapists, but eventually saw a psychiatrist: “He diagnosed me with low-grade depression and put me on a small amount of Prozac.”

Rick Springfield

The “Jessie’s Girl” singer opened up about his struggle with depression in his 2010 memoir, Late, Late at Night, revealing a suicide attempt at age 16 when he tried to hang himself. “Having suicide ride on my shoulders was not a lot of fun through a lot of my life and surviving that was a real high point for me,” the musician told Reuters. “Once puberty hit, I was pretty much skimming along the bottom, and I am (now) living long enough to understand how to deal with it.”

Ryan Tedder

The OneRepublic frontman revealed in a lengthy Facebook post in 2017 that he had been suffering from “crippling anxiety” that almost led him to quit the group. He shared that after the release of Oh My My, “I was on the verge of a nervous breakdown, not sleeping, on meds, not happy, anxiety on a crippling level and it was triggered from sheer exhaustion,” also noting that his anxiety made him want to stop writing music.

Selena Gomez

The pop star announced in 2016 that she was taking a break after suffering from mental health issues due to lupus. “As many of you know, around a year ago I revealed that I have lupus, an illness that can affect people in different ways,” she told People. “I’ve discovered that anxiety, panic attacks and depression can be side effects of lupus, which can present their own challenges.”

Shawn Mendes

“It was kind of something that hit me last year,” the singer shared with Zane Lowe in 2018 about his struggle with anxiety. “Growing up, I was a pretty calm kid. I knew people who suffered from anxiety, found it kind of hard to understand, and then when it hits you, you’re like, ‘Oh my god, this is crazy.’”

Sinead O’Connor

The singer reportedly scrapped her plans to tour in 2012 due to bipolar disorder. “As you all know I had a very serious breakdown between December and March and I had been advised by my doctor not to go on tour but didn’t want to ‘fail’ or let anyone down as the tour was already booked to coincide with album release,” she reportedly wrote on her website at the time in a since-deleted post. “So very stupidly I ignored his advice to my great detriment, attempting to be stronger than I actually am. I apologise (sic) sincerely for any difficulties this may cause.”

In August 2017, O’Connor shared emotional and troubling videos about living with mental illness. “Mental illness is a bit like drugs. It doesn’t give a s–t who you are. Equally you know what’s worse is the stigma who doesn’t give a s–t who you are,” she said in the first video, before noting in another the next day that she was suicidal.

Zayn Malik

The former One Direction member had canceled performances in the past due to his anxiety, and penned a piece about his struggle for Time in 2016. “Anxiety is nothing to be ashamed of; it affects millions of people every day,” he wrote. “When I was in One Direction, my anxiety issues were huge but, within the safety net of the band, they were at least manageable. As a solo performer, I felt much more exposed, and the psychological stress of performing had just gotten to be too much for me to handle — at that moment, at least. Rather than hiding away, sugar-coating it, I knew I had to put it all out there.”

Zendaya

“I used to struggle with anxiety pretty bad. It only happened when I sang live, not when I danced or did any other live performances, and it stemmed from a bad experience I had while singing on The Ellen DeGeneres Show in 2013. It wasn’t my best performance and I’ve never let myself live that down. I had mad anxiety ever since that,” the singer and actress revealed in a 2017 post on her app.

“I DID figure out how to bury my anxiety, though. I’ve tried focusing my energy on other things, like making movies. And I took my time and slowly built my confidence back up before I went back out on stage to sing live.”

Uncategorized

Apple’s new MacBook Pro 13-inch has same old processor as last model – Business Insider – Business Insider

May 4th, 2020

‘We could have saved lives’: Did Ottawa’s spring break COVID-19 travel advisory come too late? – The Globe and Mail

May 4th, 2020

Adriana and Art Sibley, seen here in their Barrie, Ont. home on April 30, 2020, had been in Arizona for two months, at their winter getaway, when they decided to come home. With shops and other businesses closing up, and warnings for snow birds to return to Canada, they emptied the fridge, packed up their belongings and made the four day drive back to Canada.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

Nearly 8,000 flights left the country in the week leading up to the federal government’s advisory that Canadians should refrain from all non-essential travel due to COVID-19, according to a Globe and Mail analysis of flight data.

The flight data, shared by tracking company FlightRadar24, provide a glimpse into travel volumes during a time now seen as crucial in the spread of COVID-19 in Canada.

Ottawa’s travel caution didn’t come until March 13, just two days before the beginning of spring break in Ontario, British Columbia, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, one of the country’s busiest travel periods. Adding to travellers’ confusion that week were mixed messages from federal and provincial officials across Canada on whether it was safe to travel.

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Quebeckers were already back at school and work after the province’s earlier spring break, in which more than 2,100 flights left Montreal for places such as Paris, Cancun, Mexico and Varadero, Cuba. (The flight data do not include the number of passengers.)

Number of flights leaving Canada daily

7,976

flights

Week before

spring break

in B.C., Ont.,

PEI, N.S.

Travel

advisory

Trudeau

tells Canadian

to come home

Feb. 24

2020

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: FLIGHTRADAR24

Number of flights leaving Canada daily

7,976

flights

Week before

spring break in

B.C., Ont., PEI, N.S.

Travel

advisory

Trudeau tells

Canadians to

come home

Feb. 24

2020

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: FLIGHTRADAR24

Number of flights leaving Canada daily

7,976

flights

Week before

spring break in

B.C., Ont., PEI, N.S.

Travel

advisory

Trudeau tells

Canadians to

come home

Feb. 24

2020

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: FLIGHTRADAR24

Since the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic on March 11, the federal government has significantly tightened travel rules. Flights into Canada are restricted to Canadian citizens, permanent residents and other groups, such as international students and agricultural workers. Airlines must refuse travel to anyone, Canadian or not, displaying COVID-19 symptoms, and all those arriving in Canada are required to immediately self-isolate for 14 days.

Earlier travel restrictions could have reduced the spread of the novel coronavirus in Canada, said Raiyan Chowdhury, a critical care physician and ear, nose and throat surgeon in Edmonton. Most of Canada’s cases in late February and early March were travel-related, Dr. Chowdhury noted. He said the federal government should have issued an advisory or set up travel restrictions by late February.

“We could have saved lives,” he said.

Countries such as Denmark, Poland, Slovakia and the Czech Republic clamped down at their borders in early March, when it became clear the virus had spread beyond China’s Hubei province, where SARS-CoV-2 likely originated. By late February, it was clear travellers were bringing the virus to Canada from countries such as Iran, Italy and the United States.

In the week leading to the announcement, 7,976 flights left Canada for international destinations. The Globe has also identified more than 5,200 flights between Canada and countries with at least 1,000 COVID-19 cases between March 1 and March 13.

“That’s a crazy number,” Dr. Chowdhury said. “Our hospital systems were planning for a pandemic, yet the federal government hadn’t advised Canadians not to travel abroad.”

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The flight data come with a caveat: They don’t exclude air cargo traffic (which, on an average day, accounts for about 4 per cent of total flight traffic). The federal government does not currently collect outgoing passenger figures – one of myriad crucial data gaps that have surfaced during the pandemic – although the Canada Border Services Agency said it plans to begin doing so this summer.

How Canada’s crucial data gaps are hindering the coronavirus pandemic response

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As coronavirus lockdowns ease, some countries report new infection peaks

Susan Brogly, an epidemiologist at Queen’s University, said that by the time of Ottawa’s advisory in mid-March, the coronavirus was likely already circulating within Canada.

“When should the travel advisory have happened? Probably sooner,” she said. But she suspects many Canadians would not have heeded an earlier warning given how few cases Canada had then – 198 by March 13, according to provincial figures compiled by The Globe.

Quebec

Number of flights between Quebec and

European countries during March break

158 flights

Switzerland

Other European countries

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: FLIGHTRADAR24

Number of flights between Quebec and European

countries during March break

158 flights

Switzerland

Other European countries

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: FLIGHTRADAR24

Number of flights between Quebec and European countries during March break

158 flights

Switzerland

Other

European

countries

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: FLIGHTRADAR24

Quebec and New Brunswick had the earliest spring breaks in Canada this year, in early March. By the time their spring breakers had come home, no sweeping travel advisories or quarantine restrictions were yet in effect.

From Feb. 28 – the Friday leading to Quebec’s spring break – to March 9, 425 flights left the province’s airports for Europe or flew from Europe to Quebec. Of those flights, about two in five departed from or arrived in France, which had more than 1,200 COVID-19 cases by March 9, according to Johns Hopkins University. At that point, Quebec had only five confirmed cases, and no deaths.

Since then, the province’s infection numbers have eclipsed those in the rest of the country. As of May 4, Quebec had more than 31,800 confirmed cases, 2,200 deaths and the highest number of per-capita cases in the country.

New Brunswick, on the other hand, has registered the third-lowest number of cases per capita, behind only the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Dr. Chowdhury thinks this could be because of the province’s smaller population and density, leading to fewer opportunities for infection.

When asked if Quebec’s early spring break might have hindered its ability to contain the virus, Prof. Brogly was unequivocal. “Absolutely,” she said, noting that travel to and from Europe may have been a large contributor to infections in the province. Such travel is also the suspected origin of many infections in New York, one of the hardest-hit areas in the United States.

Quebec’s land border with the United States was also busy during spring break. Data provided by Statistics Canada show that during the first half of March, 126,873 Canadian residents driving Canadian-licensed automobiles entered Quebec from the United States. The federal government does not collect statistics on the number of exit land crossings – that is, people leaving Canada. While the United States does collect these figures, data were not yet available for March.

Ontario

Flights leaving the country before

the government’s travel advisory

We can see how many cumulative flights

would have been affected if Ottawa had issued

its warning against non-essential travel a week

earlier. In Ontario’s case, 4,456 international

flights left the province between March 6 and

March 13, when the advisory went out.

Flights to countries with at least 1,000 cases

To countries with fewer than 1,000 cases

backwards to…

British Columbia

Rest of canada

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: FLIGHTRADAR24

Flights leaving the country before the

federal government’s travel advisory

We can see how many cumulative flights would have

been affected if Ottawa had issued its warning against

non-essential travel a week earlier. In Ontario’s case, 4,456

international flights left the province between March 6

and March 13, when the advisory went out.

Flights to countries with at least 1,000 confirmed cases

To countries with fewer than 1,000 cases

Counting backwards to…

British Columbia

Rest of canada

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: FLIGHTRADAR24

Flights leaving the country before the

federal government’s travel advisory

We can see how many cumulative flights would have been affected if

Ottawa had issued its warning against non-essential travel a week earlier.

In Ontario’s case, 4,456 international flights left the province between

March 6 and March 13, when the advisory went out.

Flights to countries with at least 1,000 confirmed cases

To countries with fewer than 1,000 cases

Counting backwards to…

British Columbia

Rest of canada

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: FLIGHTRADAR24

On the morning of March 12, before a two-day first ministers’ meeting in Ottawa, Ontario Premier Doug Ford, flanked by five of his ministers, gave a short speech laying out his goals for the meeting and the province’s evolving COVID-19 response.

As the press conference wrapped up, a reporter asked one final question: With March break starting in two days, would families be allowed to come back without having to submit to a 14-day quarantine? “I just want the families and their children to have a good time,” Mr. Ford replied. “Go away, have a good time, enjoy yourself.”

Within a few hours, David Williams, Ontario’s Chief Medical Health Officer, issued a memo advising against all non-essential travel outside Canada, contradicting the Premier. That warning came too late for many vacationers.

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Andrea Horwath, leader of the Ontario NDP, said Mr. Ford’s early travel advice was “irresponsible,” adding that a public inquiry examining the province’s response to the crisis should be held once the pandemic is over.

In an e-mailed statement, Ivana Yelich, a spokesperson for Mr. Ford, said that, at the time of March 12 press conference, the Premier was acting on the latest advice from provincial health officials and federal travel rules.

The province is home to the country’s busiest airport, Toronto’s Pearson International Airport, which in March accounted for about 38 per cent of all international flights leaving Canada. Many Canadian travellers pass through Pearson on their way to international destinations.

From March 6 to March 13, the week before Ontario’s spring break, 4,456 international flights left the province’s airports. The United States was the top destination, accounting for almost 70 per cent of flights. Many were likely connecting flights for passengers, given that the country is a major hub for Canadians travelling abroad.

That said, 479 flights leaving Ontario went to Florida, a popular vacation destination.

The next three top international destinations were all vacation hot spots for Canadians: Mexico (223 flights), Cuba (162) and the Dominican Republic (119). An additional 300 flights headed to Europe, including 88 to Britain, 50 to Germany and 30 to France.

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On Saturday, March 14, a day after the federal government advised Canadians against non-essential travel, Ottawa urged Canadians abroad to return home while they could, hinting at the border closings to come.

Before the travel warnings, Ontario had 59 confirmed cases and was yet to register any deaths. Two weeks later, Ontario had reported almost 1,000 cases and 18 deaths. Today, Ontario’s COVID-19 case statistics are second only to Quebec, with 17,553 confirmed cases and 1,216 deaths as of May 4.

British Columbia

With spring break coming up, B.C.’s medical officials and provincial politicians were being asked if it was safe to travel.

On Wednesday, March 11 – the day the WHO declared COVID-19 a pandemic – the province’s chief public- health official, Bonnie Henry, told British Columbians it was still safe to travel within the country, but to avoid heading abroad. The next day, Dr. Henry reversed herself, warning residents to avoid all non-essential travel.

“I don’t think I slept at all any of those nights,” Dr. Henry told The Globe in an interview last month. Troubling data were coming in from Quebec, where spring break had ended less than a week earlier, suggesting a spike in infections.

Her change of heart likely gave potential travellers crucial time to rethink their vacation plans before the travel frenzy of their own spring break. Although B.C. had some of Canada’s earliest cases, it has contained the virus’ spread much more effectively than did Quebec, Ontario or Alberta, recording 2,171 cases and 114 deaths as of May 4.

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For Janna Foreman and her family, that warning came too late.

By March 12, Ms. Foreman, a 46-year-old middle school teacher from Chilliwack, B.C., was already in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, with her husband, two kids, her mother-in-law and her mother-in-law’s sister.

When she saw a speech on March 16 in which Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told Canadians to come home, it became clear she had to return. The family cut their holidays short by two weeks and returned on March 20, paying $4,000 out-of-pocket for new flights. No one in her family has come down with symptoms or tested positive for COVID-19.

In hindsight, Ms. Foreman wishes the government had acted sooner. “If they had said this earlier in March, we wouldn’t have gone,” she said.

When the family left Cabo, Mexico had 203 confirmed cases. As of early May, the number had grown to more than 23,400.

The federal government’s response

Number of flights leaving Canada

between March 13 and 16, 2020

Top 15 travel destinations over the weekend

United States

Had at least 1,000

confirmed cases

by March 13

Dominican Republic

France, Germany,

China and South

Korea also had at

least 1,000 cases

Costa Rica

Netherlands

South Korea

THE GLOBE AND MAIL,

SOURCE: FLIGHTRADAR24, JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

Number of flights leaving Canada

between March 13 and 16, 2020

Top 15 travel destinations over the weekend

United States

Had at least 1,000

confirmed cases

by March 13

Dominican Republic

France, Germany,

China and South Korea

also had at least

1,000 cases

Costa Rica

Netherlands

South Korea

THE GLOBE AND MAIL,

SOURCE: FLIGHTRADAR24, JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

Number of flights leaving Canada between March 13 and 16, 2020

Top 15 travel destinations over the weekend

United States

Had at least 1,000

confirmed cases

by March 13

Dominican Republic

France, Germany,

China and South Korea

also had at least

1,000 cases

Costa Rica

Netherlands

South Korea

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: FLIGHTRADAR24, JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

Air traffic declined quickly after the Prime Minister’s call for Canadians abroad to return home.

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But between the government’s travel advisory on Friday, March 13, and Mr. Trudeau’s speech on Monday, thousands of flights had left the country, suggesting many families still headed for their vacations. During that four-day window, 4,575 flights left Canada: About 66 per cent headed for the U.S. while another 15 per cent flew directly to Mexico, Cuba or the Dominican Republic.

Within a week of Mr. Trudeau’s announcement, the number of international flights entering or leaving Canada plummeted from 2,253 a day to 1,056. A week after that, just 350 flights entered or left the country.

Prof. Brogly, the epidemiologist, credits the government for cutting down on travel and shuttering the borders when it did. “It certainly prevented more cases coming in,” she said.

Todd Doherty, the Conservative Party’s transport critic, says the advisory about non-essential travel came too late. Canada’s economy has taken a big hit in a bid to prevent COVID-19 from spreading and overwhelming the health care system. Provinces shut schools and non-essential businesses in mid-March – a nationwide lockdown that is gradually starting to lift only now.

“I wish [the travel advisory] would’ve come out weeks earlier,” said Mr. Doherty, who was an aviation executive before entering politics. “I think there was enough information early in January for implementing stricter measures.”

When asked why Ottawa didn’t issue an advisory or restrictions sooner, a spokesperson for Health Minister Patty Hajdu directed The Globe to statements on March 13 by Ms. Hajdu and Howard Njoo, Canada’s Deputy Chief Public Health Officer. At the time, Dr. Njoo said the non-essential travel advisory was issued because Canadian cases had been traced to travel to the U.S. and Europe.

Global Affairs Canada said in a brief statement it makes decisions based on the advice of the Public Health Agency of Canada.

In early April, the U.S.-based Pew Research Center calculated that 91 per cent of the world’s population was living under some form of travel restriction, and that about three billion people lived in countries where borders were completely closed to non-residents or non-citizens. Many closings came in mid-to-late March, timing similar to Canada’s.

After the government’s call for Canadians to return home, airports were overwhelmed. There were reports of long waits at customs and inconsistent guidance on whether returning travellers should self-isolate. On March 25, the government invoked the Quarantine Act, making a 14-day self-isolation mandatory for all people arriving in Canada.

Land crossings

Cumulative number of Canadians crossing

by land from U.S. into Canada

In millions

March, 2020

March, 2019

By March 10,

crossings had

fallen out of

sync with 2019

Border

closed

Note: Only those crossing in a

Canadian-licensed automobile.

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: STATISTICS CANADA

Cumulative number of Canadians crossing

by land from U.S. into Canada

In millions

March, 2020

March, 2019

By March 10,

crossings had

fallen out of

sync with 2019

Border

closed

Note: Only those crossing in a Canadian-licensed automobile.

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: STATISTICS CANADA

Cumulative number of Canadians crossing by land from U.S. into Canada

In millions

March, 2020

March, 2019

By March 10,

crossings had

fallen out of

sync with 2019

Border

closed

Note: Only those crossing in a Canadian-licensed automobile.

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, SOURCE: STATISTICS CANADA

When the Prime Minister told Canadians to return home, it triggered a mass homecoming for Canada’s snowbirds, many of whom drive to their winter homes in the United States.

Adriana Sibley, a 72-year-old retiree from Barrie, Ont., winters with her husband in a seniors’ community – a “seniors’ playground,” as she prefers to call it – in Mesa, Ariz., where they enjoy hiking, cycling and playing pickleball, a game somewhere between tennis and ping-pong.

Ms. Sibley and her husband had been in Arizona since Jan. 2, and planned to stay until the end of March. But when a visit from her grandchildren was cancelled by their parents, they realized it was time to head home. They embarked on the 3,600-kilometre drive on March 15, arriving in Canada four days later. They have been healthy and symptom-free since coming home.

Adriana and Art Sibley were among the 1.2 million Canadians who re-entered the country by car in March, according to land crossing data provided by Statistics Canada.

Fred Lum

While Ms. Sibley wishes the government had buttoned up the border sooner, she still credits it for issuing the advisory. “They were going by the seat of their pants, too,” she said. “I don’t blame them for leaving it a little late.”

She was among 1.2 million Canadians who re-entered the country by car in March, according to land crossing data provided by Statistics Canada that captures about 80 per cent of cross-border traffic. In 2019, by comparison, 2.2-million Canadians re-entered the country during the same time period, evidence of the impact of Canada’s border closing with the U.S. on March 20.

Land border crossing data from Statistics Canada suggest the number of crossings began to slow well before that announcement. As early as March 10, the trend in Canadian border crossings had already fallen out of sync with 2019. By March 20, 356,000 fewer Canadians in Canadian-licensed automobiles had been admitted into the country.

Looking forward

As of early May, Canada’s borders were almost entirely idle. In data released this week, the Canada Border Services Agency provided a snapshot of border traffic on May 3, 2020, comparing it with May 5, 2019 – the same day of the week last year.

The reductions are staggering: The number of travellers entering Canada on U.S.-originating flights was down 99.2 per cent. The number of travellers arriving from other parts of the world was down 96.8 per cent. Non-commercial highway travellers were down 98 per cent, while passenger rail registered zero travellers entering the country from the United States.

Prof. Brogly said the reopening of travel will have to wait until infections are clearly under control, and we have fast, reliable tests to screen travellers for infection – both things that are unlikely to happen soon.

“I think it’s just completely impractical for travel to happen right now,” she said, noting that people in some parts of Canada may be allowed to travel sooner than others depending on how many infections they still have.

For now, travel is still highly restricted, and people entering the country are screened for symptoms and required to quarantine for 14 days, with or without symptoms. All non-essential travel across the Canada-U.S. border is suspended until May 21, although that could be extended.

David Collenette, who was transport minister in the government of Jean Chrétien, is no stranger to managing travel in times of crisis: He was transport minister at the time of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, when North American aerospace largely ground to a halt.

Mr. Collenette expects that once postpandemic measures are no longer necessary, travel will mostly return to normal, although that will likely take between a year and 18 months.

Canada will have to reopen to travel slowly, and with substantial guardrails. “You’re talking about planes that hold 300 to 400 people,” he said. “How are they going to travel? Are our planes going to fly half full?”

In late April, Transport Canada made masks mandatory for all air travellers, and more measures are likely. In Austria, for instance, some travellers are required to present a medical certificate stating they’ve tested negative for the virus. In Hong Kong, all arrivals are tested at the airport.

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