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Yes, ‘Spider-Man: Miles Morales’ for PS5 is a standalone game – Engadget

June 12th, 2020

Before going to the beach or attending a cookout, the CDC wants you to consider these guidelines – WMUR Manchester

June 12th, 2020

Take the stairs, not the elevator, down from your hotel room. Encourage people to bring their own food and drinks to your cookout. Use hand sanitizer after banking at an ATM. Call ahead to restaurants and nail salons to make sure staff are wearing face coverings. And no high-fives — or even elbow bumps — at the gym.These are some of the tips in long-awaited guidance from U.S. health officials about how to reduce risk of coronavirus infection for Americans who are attempting some semblance of normal life.”I know that the people are eager to return to normal activity and ways of life,” said Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, on Friday. “However, it is important that we remember that this situation is unprecedented and that the pandemic has not ended.”The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted the guidelines Friday, along with a second set for organizing and attending big gatherings such as concerts, sporting events, protests and political rallies.But the guidelines are “not intended to endorse any particular type of event,” the CDC’s Dr. Jay Butler said in a Friday call with reporters.The staging and attendance of such events should be in accordance with what local health officials are advising, based on much the coronavirus is spreading in a particular community, he added.The guidelines are long overdue, some health experts say.Julia Marcus, an infectious disease researcher at Harvard Medical School, has likened stay-at-home suggestions to “abstinence-only” messaging and has pressed for advice to help people minimize risk. She said she was delighted by the CDC’s tips.“I think it’s a huge step in the right direction,” Marcus said. “These guidelines are really directed toward ordinary Americans trying to make decisions about risk every day.”But there are notable omissions. There’s nothing about precautions to take before going to church, no guidance about dating and sex and no explicit advice on a topic that some doctors say they get asked all the time: Is it OK to take the kids to visit grandparents?”Visiting grandma is something I must address three times a week,“ said Dr. William Schaffner, a Vanderbilt University infectious disease expert.“My empathy goes out to the CDC. It’s very, very difficult to have a precise answer for every circumstance,” he added.Stay-at-home orders, school shutdowns and business closings were followed by a national flattening in the rate of new cases. In recent weeks, many states have started reopening as they face pressure to get the pandemic-damaged economy going again. And cases are rising in nearly half the states, according to an Associated Press analysis.The CDC has put out many sets of guidelines, including some for churches, camps, schools and transit agencies. But until now, the organization hasn’t offered specific advice to people trying to decide whether to take vacations, get their nails done, host barbecues, visit a bank or library, go out to eat or exercise at a gym.Redfield called the new guidelines “common sense suggestions,” not mandates. State or local governments may want to reimpose stricter measures if new outbreaks occur, but that’s a call for them to make, CDC officials said.The guidelines repeat earlier advice about wearing face coverings, especially if it’s difficult to keep at least 6 feet away from other people.They also offers a list of questions people should consider before going out, and some things to think about in particular situations. For example, it suggests that house parties be held outside, guests be greeted with a wave instead of a hug and that everyone bring their own food and drinks.CNN contributed to this report.

Take the stairs, not the elevator, down from your hotel room. Encourage people to bring their own food and drinks to your cookout. Use hand sanitizer after banking at an ATM. Call ahead to restaurants and nail salons to make sure staff are wearing face coverings. And no high-fives — or even elbow bumps — at the gym.

These are some of the tips in long-awaited guidance from U.S. health officials about how to reduce risk of coronavirus infection for Americans who are attempting some semblance of normal life.

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“I know that the people are eager to return to normal activity and ways of life,” said Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, on Friday. “However, it is important that we remember that this situation is unprecedented and that the pandemic has not ended.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted the guidelines Friday, along with a second set for organizing and attending big gatherings such as concerts, sporting events, protests and political rallies.

But the guidelines are “not intended to endorse any particular type of event,” the CDC’s Dr. Jay Butler said in a Friday call with reporters.

The staging and attendance of such events should be in accordance with what local health officials are advising, based on much the coronavirus is spreading in a particular community, he added.

The guidelines are long overdue, some health experts say.

Julia Marcus, an infectious disease researcher at Harvard Medical School, has likened stay-at-home suggestions to “abstinence-only” messaging and has pressed for advice to help people minimize risk. She said she was delighted by the CDC’s tips.

“I think it’s a huge step in the right direction,” Marcus said. “These guidelines are really directed toward ordinary Americans trying to make decisions about risk every day.”

But there are notable omissions. There’s nothing about precautions to take before going to church, no guidance about dating and sex and no explicit advice on a topic that some doctors say they get asked all the time: Is it OK to take the kids to visit grandparents?

“Visiting grandma is something I must address three times a week,“ said Dr. William Schaffner, a Vanderbilt University infectious disease expert.

“My empathy goes out to the CDC. It’s very, very difficult to have a precise answer for every circumstance,” he added.

Stay-at-home orders, school shutdowns and business closings were followed by a national flattening in the rate of new cases. In recent weeks, many states have started reopening as they face pressure to get the pandemic-damaged economy going again. And cases are rising in nearly half the states, according to an Associated Press analysis.

The CDC has put out many sets of guidelines, including some for churches, camps, schools and transit agencies. But until now, the organization hasn’t offered specific advice to people trying to decide whether to take vacations, get their nails done, host barbecues, visit a bank or library, go out to eat or exercise at a gym.

Redfield called the new guidelines “common sense suggestions,” not mandates. State or local governments may want to reimpose stricter measures if new outbreaks occur, but that’s a call for them to make, CDC officials said.

The guidelines repeat earlier advice about wearing face coverings, especially if it’s difficult to keep at least 6 feet away from other people.

They also offers a list of questions people should consider before going out, and some things to think about in particular situations. For example, it suggests that house parties be held outside, guests be greeted with a wave instead of a hug and that everyone bring their own food and drinks.

CNN contributed to this report.

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Sony Boss Explains PS5 Design – IGN Daily Fix – IGN

June 12th, 2020

WHO: No ‘live’ coronavirus found in breast milk, recommends breastfeeding, report says – Fox News

June 12th, 2020

World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Friday that coronavirus-positive mothers who breastfeed are not at risk of transmitting the virus to their infant through their milk.

“We know that children are at relatively low risk of COVID-19, but are at high risk of numerous other diseases and conditions that breastfeeding prevents,” Tedros said in a press briefing.

Tedros said the that the WHO had carefully investigated the risk of women transmitting the disease onto their child, and found the mother should continue breast feeding, unless she is too ill to continue doing so.

WHO GUIDANCE: HEALTHY PEOPLE SHOULD WEAR MASKS ONLY WHEN ‘TAKING CARE OF’ CORONAVIRUS PATIENTS

“Based on the available evidence, WHO’s advice is that the benefits of breastfeeding outweigh any potential risks of transmission of COVID-19,” Tedros said Friday.

Anshu Banerjee, director of WHO’s Department of Reproductive Health and Research, said that only “fragments” of the virus exist in the breast milk, and live virus has not yet been detected in breast milk.

“So, the risk of transmission from mother, to child therefore, so far, has not been established,” Banerjee said.

WHO has posted guidelines for health facilities maintaining necessary services for newborn care during the coronavirus pandemic.

WSJ REPORT HIGHLIGHTS HOW NEW YORK’S CORONAVIRUS RESPONSE MADE PANDEMIC ‘WORSE’

Women are encouraged to still touch their infants and are instructed by the WHO to “hold your new born skin to skin,” even when positive for coronavirus. The WHO also says that mothers should share a room with their newborns and exercise hygienic practices when breastfeeding and holding their infant, such as washing your hands for 20 seconds.

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“Breastmilk contains antibodies and other immunological benefits that can help protect against respiratory diseases,” the WHO wrote in a their report.

“The experience obtained so far shows that the disease course of COVID-19 generally is not severe in infants and young children,” the statement notes. “The main risk of transmission appears to come from the respiratory tract of an infected mother.”

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WHO: No ‘live’ coronavirus found in breast milk, recommends breastfeeding, report says – Fox News

June 12th, 2020

World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Friday that coronavirus-positive mothers who breastfeed are not at risk of transmitting the virus to their infant through their milk.

“We know that children are at relatively low risk of COVID-19, but are at high risk of numerous other diseases and conditions that breastfeeding prevents,” Tedros said in a press briefing.

Tedros said the that the WHO had carefully investigated the risk of women transmitting the disease onto their child, and found the mother should continue breast feeding, unless she is too ill to continue doing so.

WHO GUIDANCE: HEALTHY PEOPLE SHOULD WEAR MASKS ONLY WHEN ‘TAKING CARE OF’ CORONAVIRUS PATIENTS

“Based on the available evidence, WHO’s advice is that the benefits of breastfeeding outweigh any potential risks of transmission of COVID-19,” Tedros said Friday.

Anshu Banerjee, director of WHO’s Department of Reproductive Health and Research, said that only “fragments” of the virus exist in the breast milk, and live virus has not yet been detected in breast milk.

“So, the risk of transmission from mother, to child therefore, so far, has not been established,” Banerjee said.

WHO has posted guidelines for health facilities maintaining necessary services for newborn care during the coronavirus pandemic.

WSJ REPORT HIGHLIGHTS HOW NEW YORK’S CORONAVIRUS RESPONSE MADE PANDEMIC ‘WORSE’

Women are encouraged to still touch their infants and are instructed by the WHO to “hold your new born skin to skin,” even when positive for coronavirus. The WHO also says that mothers should share a room with their newborns and exercise hygienic practices when breastfeeding and holding their infant, such as washing your hands for 20 seconds.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“Breastmilk contains antibodies and other immunological benefits that can help protect against respiratory diseases,” the WHO wrote in a their report.

“The experience obtained so far shows that the disease course of COVID-19 generally is not severe in infants and young children,” the statement notes. “The main risk of transmission appears to come from the respiratory tract of an infected mother.”

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RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki acknowledges systemic racism in her police force – CTV News

June 12th, 2020

TORONTO — Two days after admitting that she struggled with “five or six” definitions of systemic racism, RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki has acknowledged that Canada’s national police service is grappling with a long history of racial discrimination.

“I did acknowledge that we, like others, have racism in our organization, but I did not say definitively that systemic racism exists in the RCMP. I should have,” Lucki said in a written statement Friday.

“Throughout our history and today, we have not always treated racialized and Indigenous people fairly.”

Lucki’s statement comes after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau contradicted her on the subject and the emergence of police dashcam footage that appears to show an RCMP officer punching and tackling an Alberta First Nations chief during an arrest in March.

In an interview with CTV National News Chief Anchor and Senior Editor Lisa LaFlamme on Wednesday, Lucki was asked about recent comments from Alberta RCMP Deputy Commissioner Curtis Zablocki, who on Monday denied the existence of systemic racism in policing.

“You know Lisa, I did speak with Deputy Commissioner Zablocki this morning after that and we talked about what did systemic racism mean. And I really struggle with and — and I’m not trying to avoid your question — but I’m struggling with it because I’ve heard about five or six definitions,” she said.

In separate interviews that day with other media organizations, Lucki said she was struggling with 15 to 20 different definitions of systemic racism.

She went on to suggest that “unconscious bias” existed in policing, but she stopped short of acknowledging the role of systemic racism, a term that refers to the culmination of longstanding overt and covert discrimination against racialized groups.

“Systemic racism isn’t about the behaviour of a single individual or the actions of one person,” Lucki said in her new comments Friday. “It’s in the institutional structures that reflect the inequities that persist in our society. And it shows up in policies, processes or practices that may appear neutral on the surface, but disadvantage racialized people or groups.”

Alberta RCMP Deputy Commissioner Curtis Zablocki also changed his tune on the subject on Friday, saying it’s now clear to him that “much work” needs to be done in policing.

“For me it was really getting a better perspective on what systemic racism is. As I’m sure you’re aware, there are many types of racism terms and categories, as I did some research and Googling it, it just became clear,” he said.

“I really needed to better understand systemic racism.”

In response to the video of Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation Chief Allan Adam’s arrest, Trudeau said he has “serious questions” about what happened and called for swift action on police reform, including an open, transparent and independent investigation.

“I think we’ve seen examples of systemic discrimination, systemic racism in the past days in many different ways and that’s why we need to address it seriously,” he said. “We need to look at the entire system to improve it, to make sure situations like this don’t happen in the future.”

Lucki and Zablocki’s comments were welcomed by Adam’s legal counsel, Brian Beresh, but he also expressed lingering doubts.

“I’m pleased that they acknowledged systemic racism, I’m surprised of the suggestion that it took one week for them to realize it,” Beresh told CTV’s Power Play on Friday.

“There has to be some immediate response because to hear officer Zablocki, who I don’t know, suggest that within one week he came to realize what systemic racism is all about does not impress me. Anybody with his experience in the RCMP either knows it, has seen it, smelt it, or been around it.”

Moving forward, Beresh said it’s time to reconsider what policing looks like in Canada.

“The basic change that has to occur is that the RCMP has to be de-militarized, it has to be a civilian police force that assists in bringing harmony to our society. We don’t need the RCMP to try to control First Nations, Indigenous Peoples, we need a police force that can work with everyone so that we have a harmonious society.”

Calls to “defund the police” have been growing in Canada and the United States following the death of George Floyd, the Black man who was killed in May after a white police officer shoved his knee into Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes.

In Canada, anti-racism protests have been underscored by several recent incidents involving police, including the death of Chantel Moore, an Indigenous woman who was shot and killed by police in New Brunswick during a wellness check, and the death of Regis Korchinski-Paquet, a 29-year-old Black woman who died after falling from her Toronto apartment balcony while police officers were in her home.

With files from CTVNews.ca’s Sarah Turnbull

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Tick-borne disease with symptoms similar to COVID-19 on the rise in New York state – fox6now.com

June 12th, 2020

NEW YORK — A tick-borne illness with similar symptoms to COVID-19 is reportedly on the rise in New York state.

The disease, called anaplasmosis, is caused by a bacteria that is spread to people through tick bites, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Some of the symptoms can include fever, headache, chills and muscle aches — which are also similar signs of the coronavirus as listed by the CDC.

“That’s one that’s really on the rise, particularly in the northeastern part of New York,” Byron Backenson, deputy director of the state Health Department’s Bureau of Communicable Disease Control, told the news magazine Adirondack Explorer.

The onset of symptoms usually begins one to two weeks after the bite of an infected tick. And while rare, anaplasmosis can be fatal if left untreated.

Backenson noted the difficulty in informing the public about the increase of anaplasmosis amid the ongoing global pandemic. He said it often is also overshadowed by Lyme disease, which is still the most prevalent tick-borne illness in New York with more than 5,500 new cases each year.

Not including New York City, the state saw about 300 human cases of anaplasmosis in 2009 but by 2018, records show cases more than tripled, the magazine reported.

Unlike Lyme disease, for which studies have shown diagnostic tests are often highly inaccurate, the test for anaplasmosis is easy. It is often treated with antibiotics, according to the CDC.

In addition to the recent rise in the bacteria, there are also more people seeking the outdoors after being cooped inside for months in quarantine amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Ticks are typically found outdoors, in wooded or grassy areas at ground level, according to the New York Health Department. The insects cling to tall grass, brush and shrubs and also live in lawns and gardens, especially at the edges of woods and around old stone walls, the department says.

The best protection from ticks is to avoid contact with soil, leaf litter and vegetation. Health experts say to wear enclosed shoes, long pants and a long-sleeved shirt if hiking through tick-prone areas — and check clothes and any exposed skin frequently for ticks while outdoors.

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Popular blood pressure medicines do not put patients at greater COVID-19 risk, new study finds – Yahoo News

June 12th, 2020
Popular blood pressure medicines do not put patients at greater COVID-19 risk, new study findsPopular blood pressure medicines do not put patients at greater COVID-19 risk, new study finds
FILE PHOTO: An illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), depicts the 2019 Novel Coronavirus

By Deborah J. Nelson and Robin Respaut

(Reuters) – New research offers reassuring evidence to hundreds of millions of people with high blood pressure that popular anti-hypertension drugs do not put them at greater risk from COVID-19 as some experts had feared.

Two blood pressure-lowering drug classes, called ACE inhibitors and ARBs, came under scrutiny after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in April that 72% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients 65 or older had hypertension.

ACE inhibitors and ARBs are thought to trigger activity along the same biological pathways used by the COVID-19 novel coronavirus to attack the lungs.

Researchers at Oxford University had recommended some patients stop the drugs until the risks were better known, while others argued patients should stay on the medications. An expert at the Johns Hopkins Center for Drug Safety and Effectiveness in Baltimore described the debate as “one of the most important clinical questions.”

The new study made publicly available on Friday found no clinically significant increased risk of either a diagnosis or hospitalization of COVID-19 with ACE or ARB use compared with other first-line drug treatments for hypertension.

The authors recommended that patients should not discontinue their treatment to avoid the virus, which has infected over 7.5 million people worldwide and killed more than 420,000. (open https://tmsnrt.rs/3aIRuz7 in an external browser)

“Our findings are quite reassuring,” said Marc Suchard, a biostatistician at the University of California, Los Angeles, who co-led the study. “Taking an ACE or an ARB is just as safe as other first-list hypertension agents in terms of your risk of contracting COVID-19.”

The study analyzed the electronic medical records of 1.1 million patients on anti-hypertension drugs from the United States and Spain and has not yet been peer reviewed. 

It was part of the Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics program (OHDSI, pronounced Odyssey) response to COVID-19, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, and SIDIAP, a Spanish health research organization.

OHDSI is an open-source collaborative research platform that conducts large-scale studies.

The findings join a growing body of evidence showing that the life-saving drugs neither increase nor reduce the risk of contracting COVID-19 or developing a severe case of the virus.

Harmony R. Reynolds, a cardiologist at New York University Grossman School of Medicine and the lead author of a study published last month in The New England Journal of Medicine, said she had been besieged by calls from worried patients.

With little research to go on, she advised them to stay on the drugs and embarked on a study with colleagues to analyze the medical records of over 12,000 COVID-19 patients at NYU’s Langone Health system. They found that those using ACE inhibitors or ARBs were no more likely to test positive than those who were not, nor was their risk of severe illness higher. The same held true for other classes of drugs – beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers and thiazide diuretics.

Separate studies of more than 12,000 patients in Spain and more than 30,000 health system beneficiaries in Italy reached similar conclusions. They were published last month in The Lancet and the New England Journal, respectively. 

Another study in the New England Journal in May reported no increased risk of hospital deaths associated with ACE inhibitors. Both that study and another on hydroxychloroquine were retracted earlier this month after the co-authors said they could no longer vouch for the validity of the data they obtained from Surgisphere, a private medical record firm, however.

(Reporting by Deborah Nelson in Maryland and Robin Respaut in San Francisco; Editing by Elyse Tanouye and Sonya Hepinstall)

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Coronavirus Updates: CDC Warns Lockdowns May Resume If Cases Go Up as Trump Shrugs Off Second Wave – Bloomberg QuickTake News

June 12th, 2020

As Covid-19 cases soar to new highs, U.S. governors are again in the crucible, facing wrenching choices about how to balance economic recovery and the health of citizens.

Their divergent approaches are inflaming tensions within states as well as with neighbors. While some have paused to reassess the wisdom of allowing movement and commerce, many are plunging ahead despite daunting numbers like Florida’s 2.8% increase in reported cases Friday, its largest daily jump since May 1.

The surge also has produced record numbers of new cases in Arizona, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Alabama and North Carolina. “The disease is spreading,” Governor Roy Cooper said Friday afternoon.

The outbreaks — and the dilemmas for governors — come about a month and a half after U.S. states began emerging from emergency lockdowns, and as the country surpasses 2 million confirmed infections and 114,000 deaths. The pressure reflects the Trump administration’s approach to the pandemic, providing largely voluntary guidance and leaving states to set strategies. That has produced a patchwork of policies and cleared the way to reopening of high-risk places like casinos and bars.

At the first U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention briefing in months, officials Friday said little about why cases are increasing in some places, instead repeating familiar advice about wearing masks and washing hands. Jay Butler, CDC’s Covid-19 response incident manager, said any lockdown decisions would be local.

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Chief Allan Adam arrest: Cameras not enough to solve RCMP systemic racism, experts say – Globalnews.ca

June 12th, 2020

Dashcam footage of the RCMP’s arrest of Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation Chief Allan Adam in Alberta shows that capturing such incidents on camera isn’t enough to address issues of systemic racism in the policing of Indigenous communities in Canada, experts say.

Chief Adam was arrested outside a casino in Fort McMurray, Alta., by RCMP officers early on March 10. A RCMP dashboard camera recorded the events and the footage was filed as a court exhibit on Thursday.

READ MORE: Alberta RCMP dashcam video shows violent arrest of First Nation chief, moments leading up to it

The nearly 12-minute video shows the back-and-forth between Adam and an RCMP officer leading up to the arrest, which culminated with a second police officer running into view and tackling Adam to the ground.

“It’s horrific and it’s barbaric,” said Lori Campbell, a two-spirit Cree/Métis and director of the Waterloo Indigenous Students Centre.

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Before the release of the video, Adam had held a news conference to publicize his arrest — the latest in a number of violent police confrontations with Indigenous people that came to light in recent weeks.

READ MORE: Chantel Moore’s death prompts renewed calls for New Brunswick police watchdog

On Monday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he wants police to be equipped with body-worn cameras to help overcome what he said was public distrust in law enforcement.

2:07Violent arrest of First Nation chief sparks calls for change

Violent arrest of First Nation chief sparks calls for change

He added he had raised the issue with RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki.

Lucki later announced she would “engage in work and discussion… on a broader rollout of body-worn cameras” to in an effort to increase trust between the national police force and the communities it serves, as well as boost accountability and transparency.

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READ MORE: RCMP chief to seek ‘broader rollout’ of body cameras in wake of anti-racism protests

Chad Haggarty served for 17 years in the RCMP in Alberta and now works as a student-at-law in criminal defence in Calgary — the only city in Canada to have equipped all its front-line officers with body cameras.

From a legal perspective, he said body-worn cameras are “indispensable” and “the best tool” the public has right now to ensure appropriate conduct by police officers.

But he added those cameras may not prevent improper conduct from occurring.

“It may not stop them from the terrible things that they’re going to do, but it certainly allows us to go back and examine the propriety of their actions,” he said.

2:03Disturbing dashcam video shows violent arrest of First Nation chief

Disturbing dashcam video shows violent arrest of First Nation chief

Campbell said that’s exactly what she took away from watching the footage of Adam’s arrest, saying the presence of the dashcam didn’t “stop the outcome of what occurred.”

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“It doesn’t matter whether there’s cameras there or not,” she told Global News.

READ MORE: Police body cameras in Canada — How common are they and do they reduce excessive force?

Campbell argued the cameras haven’t been proven to accomplish what many advocates originally thought they would — which was to serve as a deterrent. Several studies conducted on use of body-cameras have concluded the cameras have had no measurable impact on police behaviour, but others have found some benefit.

“For police services now who haven’t been using the body cameras in Canada to decide that that is going to be their next proactive reform decision to make and to spend money on, we already know it’s not working, so they don’t need to do that,” Campbell argued.

All it is doing is filming essentially this violence porn against Black and brown people that people are now watching. And every time we see it, it’s devastating and trauma-inducing.”

In recent weeks, video footage also circulated of an RCMP officer hitting an Inuk man with the door of a moving truck during an arrest in Nunavut. Days later, Chantel Moore, an Indigenous woman from B.C., was shot dead by police in Edmundston, N.B.

RCMP created to control Indigenous people

The RCMP as an institution was never built to keep Indigenous communities safe, Campbell said. Rather, it was used to confine Indigenous peoples on reserves and clear the way for western settlement.

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Canada’s first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, got the idea for the Mounties from the Royal Irish Constabulary, a paramilitary police force the British created to keep the Irish under control.

He decided that instead of it being too expensive to send military out west, that he would form his own essentially Royal Irish Constabulary, but he called it the North-West Mounted Police,” Campbell said.

“He enlisted 200 men and sent them out west to contain the Indigenous peoples and to surveil them and to protect settlers from Indigenous people.

“Then, of course, later that becomes the RCMP and that is still who polices and surveils and confines us in our communities.”

During the years residential schools were in operation, it was RCMP officers who were tasked with going into Indigenous communities and forcefully removing the children, added Gabrielle Lindstrom, an assistant professor in Indigenous Studies with Mont Royal University’s department of humanity.

“The RCMP are definitely part of the colonial legacy and play a huge role in that. And they continue to play a huge role in that today,” Lindstrom said.

Because of this history, many Indigenous people grew up fearing police and have a visceral reaction to the sight of law enforcement, said Reuben Breaker, an elected councillor with the Siksika Nation, east of Calgary.

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I don’t drink or do drugs or anything like that, but nonetheless, the image of a police car… there’s automatic fear and guilt because that’s what we associate with the RCMP,” he said on Friday.

“In our language, they’re called Inakiikowan. That means people that capture.”

Breaker told Global News seeing the video of Adam’s arrest “automatically brings anger” to Indigenous people.

“It’s so common,” he said, speaking from Strathmore, Alta.

“That has happened in many communities for many, many years. But it just has gone unreported or unresolved.”

READ MORE: Canada’s prison watchdog disturbed by ‘Indigenization’ of correctional system

Today, Indigenous people are over-represented in Canada’s corrections system. The federal prison ombudsman sounded the alarm about this earlier this year, warning that the proportion of Indigenous people in federal custody had reached a record high of more than 30 per cent due to entrenched imbalances.

After backlash, RCMP acknowledges systemic racism

As outrage mounts across Canada about the treatment on Indigenous people, one first step is for RCMP leadership to acknowledge there is systemic racism within the national police force, Campbell and Haggerty argued.

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The RCMP’s deputy commissioner in Alberta was criticized this week for denying systemic racism existing in the force. In a later interview with Global News, Lucki, for her part, said she believes there is “unconscious bias” among members in the police force but that she’s “struggling” with the definition of systemic racism and how that applies to the institution of the RCMP.

She walked back those statements on Friday afternoon, after Trudeau contradicted her and others criticized her comments.

“I did acknowledge that we, like others, have racism in our organization, but I did not say definitively that systemic racism exists in the RCMP. I should have,” she wrote.

“As many have said, I do know that systemic racism is part of every institution, the RCMP included. “Throughout our history and today, we have not always treated racialized and Indigenous people fairly.”

RCMP media relations declined Global News’ request for an interview with Commissioner Lucki about the released video of Adam’s arrest on Friday.

The deputy commissioner in Alberta also backpedalled on his comments in a press conference late Friday.

Cultural, structural changes needed in RCMP, experts argue

After an acknowledgement, “changing the behaviour of race-based policing is going to require … a cultural shift within the RCMP,” Haggarty argued.

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Accomplishing that requires concrete action, he and Campbell agreed.

In the immediate future, Campbell said a good place to start would be the release of the delayed federal action plan, promised in response to the final report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

That report stated: “The RCMP have not proven to Canada that they are capable of holding themselves to account.”

But given the foundations on which the RCMP was built, Campbell is not optimistic the massive police service can be appropriately reformed and instead favours defunding the force and reallocating the resources.

Instead of investing in body cameras, Campbell argued, “take that money and invest it in things like social services, child services, community programming, mental health supports, social workers.”

In her statement on Friday, Lucki said the RCMP is focused on “thoughtful action.”

“We now have the opportunity to lead positive change on this critical issue. It is time to double down on these efforts — there is so much more to do,” she said.

“There is no one answer, no single solution, no one approach. It is the ongoing commitment to work and continue to learn that will help us make real progress and I am motivated and determined to make change.”

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— With files from Global News’ Amanda Connolly, Heather Yourex-West, Jane Gerster, Mercedes Stephenson, Phil Heidenreich the Canadian Press and Reuters

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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