Archive

Archive for June 17th, 2020

10 states are seeing highest daily average of new COVID-19 cases – The Mercury News

June 17th, 2020

By Holly Yan and Madeline Holcombe | CNN

Just as much of the US was improving, 10 states are seeing their highest seven-day average of new coronavirus cases per day since the pandemic started months ago, according to a CNN analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University.

The data includes new cases reported by Johns Hopkins through Tuesday. The states seeing record-high averages are Alabama, Arizona, California, Florida, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina and Texas.

Texas also reported a record-high number of daily Covid-19 hospitalizations on Monday, with 2,326.

Los Angeles County, which accounts for almost half of California’s cases, on Wednesday reported another single-day high of new cases, though officials said the spike was due to lagging test reports.

While some politicians have attributed higher case numbers to better testing, recent surges are outpacing the increase in tests, said Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, chair of the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania.

“You can have a small percentage increase because of testing in terms of number of cases,” he said.

“But when you see 50% or 150% increase in the number of cases you are seeing — which is what we are seeing across the South — that’s not testing. That’s new cases. That’s community spread.”

How states are trending

According to data from Johns Hopkins University:

• 21 states are seeing upward trends in newly reported cases from one week to the next: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Oregon, Louisiana, Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia and Wyoming.

• Eight states are seeing steady numbers of newly reported cases: Connecticut, Indiana, Maine, Mississippi, Ohio, South Dakota, Utah and Washington.

• 21 states are seeing a downward trend: Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia and Wisconsin.

• One state, Vermont, has seen a decrease of at least 50%.

Across the country, more than 2.1 million people have been infected with coronavirus, and more than 117,000 have died.

What states need to do if they don’t want to shut down again

“We’re seeing these flare-ups, these hot spots now popping up in a number of states — particularly Texas, Florida, Arizona,” said Erin Bromage, an associate professor of biology at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

“Those case numbers are really going up fast. And more importantly, the number of hospitalizations in those states are increasing, which usually lags a few weeks behind the number of new cases.”

Florida recorded almost 2,800 new coronavirus cases on Monday — its highest number of new and confirmed cases in a single day, according to the Florida Department of Health.

But Gov. Ron DeSantis said the state will not shut down.

“We’re going to go forward. We’re going to continue to protect the most vulnerable,” DeSantis said. He also urged residents to maintain social distancing and avoid crowds.

States don’t need to shut down again to control the virus, Bromage said. “They just need clearer messaging to guide their population about what to do.”

“Get masks on the population. We know that helps,” he said.

“Reinforce the social distancing between people. And slow down this race to (fully) reopen. Because if you don’t, we know that these spikes in cases — if they keep increasing the way they are — always precede really large cases in hospitals.”

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice reported a sixth outbreak linked to churches. Three are still active, he said.

At least 32 cases have been identified at one church in Greenbrier County, and four cases at a church in Ohio County. Justice did not say how many parishioners had tested positive at a Boone County church, the third active outbreak location.

Texas mayors want to require masks in close public spaces

Nine Texas mayors, including those in Houston, Dallas, Austin and San Antonio, have urged Gov. Greg Abbott to give them the authority to require masks be worn in public “where physical distancing cannot be practiced.”

In a letter to Abbott, the mayors said “many people in many of our cities are still refusing to wear these face coverings even though these coverings are scientifically proven to help prevent the disease from spreading.”

The governor agreed that “wearing a mask is very important” but expressed reservations about enforcement and potential punishment. “All of us have a collective responsibility to educate the public that wearing a mask is the best thing to do.”

A growing number of studies show face masks reduce the spread of the coronavirus, especially because many people are contagious before they have symptoms and because this virus can spread by just talking or breathing.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey resisted calls from physicians across his state to mandate wearing masks in public places, saying he would leave that up to mayors to decide, because the level of transmission vary from region to region.

Montgomery, Alabama, Mayor Steven Reed issued an executive order requiring masks or face coverings to be worn in public places, a day after the city council failed to pass an ordnance with that requirement.

An estimated 230,000 to 450,000 cases of the virus were prevented in the states that enacted requirements for mask use between April 8 and May 15, a study reported Tuesday found.

“The findings suggest that requiring face mask use in public might help in mitigating COVID-19 spread,” wrote Wei Lyu and George Wehby, with the Department of Health Management and Policy at the University of Iowa’s College of Public Health.

Another study published in the Lancet medical journal also said wearing a face mask decreases the chances of spreading coronavirus.

A 2nd wave might come, but we’re still in the 1st wave

A “second wave” of coronavirus could start in late August, with the US reaching more than 201,000 Covid-19 deaths by October 1, according to the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington.

But analysts say the rates of coronavirus haven’t even dropped to a level low enough to call the first wave over.

As the virus spreads, it appears to be following highways as more people go out and more places reopen, researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania said Tuesday. They cited south-to-north spread along I-95 on the East Coast, I-85 in the South, and I-5 and I-10 in the West, the team said.

Meantime, New York and New Jersey no longer have the highest per-capita infection rate. That would be the Navajo Nation, which spans parts of New Mexico, Utah and Arizona and has a population of about 173,600 people.

The Navajo Nation announced lockdowns over the next two weekends to try to help quash the outbreak. The first is expected Friday to Monday, and the next will take place the following weekend.

“Now is not the time to back down,” Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said. “Wear your masks, practice social distancing, and wash your hands.”

Some Americans are exhausted from the pandemic, acknowledged Dr. Ashish Jha, director of the Harvard Global Health Institute. But people can’t let their guards down.

“We may be done with the pandemic,” he said, “but the pandemic is not done with us.”

Uncategorized

Greenville County reports second-most new coronavirus cases as daily S.C. cases, deaths continue to rise – WYFF4 Greenville

June 17th, 2020

GABRIELLE: SEE YOU SOON, THANK YOU. A LOOK NOW AT OUR LATEST CORONAVIRUS HEADLINES, TONIGHT, JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY, SAYS MORE THAN 117,000 PEOPLE HAVE DIED FROM THE CORONAVIRUS IN THE U. IN THEIR LATEST REPORT, THE UNIVERSITY, SAYS THE DEATH TOLL IN THE U.S. IS AT LEAST 117,000 — 117,129. THE REPORT ALSO SAYS THERE HAVE BEEN MORE THAN 2 MILLION CASES OF THE CORONAVIRUS IN THE COUNTRY. ACROSS THE COUNTRY, THE UNIVERSITY SAYS THERE WERE MORE THAN 5,000 NEW CASES YESTERDAY. WASHINGTON, D.C. IS LOOKING TO ENTER PHASE TWO OF ITS REOPENING NEXT WEEK. THE CITY’S MAYOR SAYS SHE WILL DECIDE ON FRIDAY, IF THE CITY’S ENTERING INTO PHASE AS EARLY AS TWO MONDAY. NIGEL: SOUTH CAROLINA OFFICIALS ANNOUNCED 10 MORE DEATHS ASSOCIATED WITH COVID-19, BRINGING THE TOTAL TO 617. THERE ARE 20,551 POSITIVE CASES ACROSS THE STATE. THAT IS AN INCREASE FROM OVER 500 JUST FROM YESTERDAY. . IN NORTH CAROLINA, HEALTH OFFICIALS ARE REPORTING 10 MORE CORONAVIRUS RELATED DEATHS. THAT BRINGS THE DEATH TOLL TO 1,168. HEALTH OFFICIALS ARE ALSO REPORTING MORE THAN 1,000 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASE BRINGING THE TOTAL NUMBER OF CONFIRMED CASES TO MORE THAN 46,000. AS OF THE STATE ESTIMATES MORE MONDAY, THAN 29,000 HAVE RECOVERED FROM COVID-19. TONIGHT IN GEORGIA, STATE HEALTH OFFICIALS SAY THE STATE HAS SEEN MORE THAN 60,000 CASES OF THE CORONAVIRUS. THAT IS ABOUT 8% OF THE PEOPLE TESTED FOR COVID-19. IN TODAY’S REPORT,

Advertisement

Greenville County reports second-most new coronavirus cases as daily S.C. cases, deaths continue to rise

Highest single-day number of hospitalizations reported in state since April 29


The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control announced Wednesday 577 new confirmed cases and two new probable cases of COVID-19, with 10 additional confirmed deaths.This brings the total number of people confirmed cases to 20,551, probable cases to five, confirmed deaths to 617, and zero probable deaths.Nine of the deaths occurred in elderly individuals from Beaufort (1), Berkeley (1), Colleton (1), Greenville (1), Horry (1), Lancaster (1), Lexington (2) and York (1) counties, and one (1) death occurred in a middle-aged individual from Charleston County. There are currently no probable deaths.The number of new confirmed cases by county are listed below.Aiken (6), Anderson (7), Beaufort (29), Berkeley (5), Calhoun (1), Charleston (35), Chester (2), Chesterfield (2), Cherokee (2), Colleton (2), Clarendon (6), Darlington (6), Dillon (4), Dorchester (8), Fairfield (2), Florence (22), Georgetown (22), Greenville (77), Greenwood (5), Horry (120), Jasper (1), Kershaw (10), Lancaster (11), Laurens (5), Lexington (35), Marion (5), Marlboro (4), Newberry (2), Oconee (3), Orangeburg (6), Pickens (20), Richland (57), Saluda (2), Spartanburg (22), Sumter (5), Williamsburg (7), York (19)The number of new probable cases are listed below.Richland (2)According to DHEC, South Carolina now has a higher case rate per 100,000 people than Georgia.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Probable cases and deathsDHEC began this week reporting probable cases and probable deaths in regard to COVID-19. This makes South Carolina the 23rd state in the country to follow recent recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to report this information.There are currently zero probable deaths in the state, and five cumulative probable cases: June 14, York County (1); June 15, Lexington (1) and Richland (1) counties; June 16, Richland County (2). This new information is available on our Testing Data & Projections webpage.A confirmed case is an individual who had a confirmatory viral test performed by way of a throat or nose swab and that specimen tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, which is the virus that causes COVID-19. A positive viral test, also called a PCR test or molecular test, alone is enough to classify a confirmed case.A probable case is an individual who has not had a confirmatory viral test performed but has:1. epidemiologic evidence and clinical evidence of infection, or2. a positive antibody blood test and either epidemiologic evidence or clinical evidence. (A positive antibody test alone is currently not a reliable method for diagnosing a COVID-19 infection.)A confirmed death is someone whose death is related to COVID-19 and who tested positive with a confirmatory viral test for COVID-19.A probable death is an individual whose death certificate lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death but did not undergo confirmatory viral testing.A new webpage provides information about probable cases and deaths and will be updated to reflect the most current CDC recommendations for reporting this new information.Testing in South CarolinaAs of Tuesday, a total of 304,431 tests have been conducted in the state. See a detailed breakdown of tests in South Carolina on the Data and Projections webpage. DHEC’s Public Health Laboratory is operating extended hours and is testing specimens seven days a week. The Public Health Laboratory’s current timeframe for providing results to health care providers is 24-48 hours.Percent Positive Test Trends among Reported COVID-19 CasesThe total number of individuals tested yesterday statewide was 4,409 (not including antibody tests) and the percent positive was 13.1%. When the percent positive is low, it may indicate that more widespread testing is being performed and the percent positive may more accurately reflect how much disease is present in the community.The 7-day average of cases reported is higher than it has ever been.Today 687.7One week ago 447.4One month ago 176.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More than 75 Mobile Testing Clinics Scheduled StatewideAs part of DHEC’s ongoing efforts to increase testing in underserved and rural communities across the state, the agency is working with community partners to set up mobile testing clinics that bring testing to these communities. Currently, there are 78 mobile testing events scheduled through July 18 with new testing events added regularly. Find a mobile testing clinic event near you at scdhec.gov/covid19mobileclinics.Residents can also get tested at one of 173 permanent COVID-19 testing facilities across the state. Visit scdhec.gov/covid19testingfor more information.Hospital Bed OccupancyAs of Wednesday morning, 3,087 inpatient hospital beds are available and 7,411 are in use, which is a 70.59% statewide hospital bed utilization rate. Of the 7,411 inpatient beds currently used, 607 are occupied by patients who have either tested positive or are under investigation for COVID-19.7-day average of deaths, hospitalizationsThe 7-day average of deaths reported rose to 6. It was below 6 yesterday for the first time since May 22.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How South Carolinians Can Stop the SpreadEvidence is increasing about the high rates of infection in people who do not have symptoms and don’t know they are infectious. This places everyone at risk of getting the virus or unknowingly transmitting it to someone else. Steps people can take to protect ourselves and others include:Practicing social distancing Wearing a mask in public Avoiding group gatherings Regularly washing your hands Staying home if sickFor the latest information related to COVID-19 visit scdhec.gov/COVID19.Visit scdmh.net for stress, anxiety and mental health resources from the S.C. Department of Mental Health.*As new information is provided to the department, some changes in cases may occur. Cases are reported based on the person’s county of residence, as it is provided to the department. DHEC’s COVID-19 map will adjust to reflect any reclassified cases.Additional coronavirus resources:Tracking COVID-19 curve of cases, deaths in the Carolinas, Georgia Latest update on coronavirus cases, latest headlines in Carolinas, Georgia COVID-19 maps of Carolinas, Georgia: Latest coronavirus cases by countySign up for WYFF News 4 coronavirus daily newsletter

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control announced Wednesday 577 new confirmed cases and two new probable cases of COVID-19, with 10 additional confirmed deaths.

This brings the total number of people confirmed cases to 20,551, probable cases to five, confirmed deaths to 617, and zero probable deaths.

Advertisement

Nine of the deaths occurred in elderly individuals from Beaufort (1), Berkeley (1), Colleton (1), Greenville (1), Horry (1), Lancaster (1), Lexington (2) and York (1) counties, and one (1) death occurred in a middle-aged individual from Charleston County. There are currently no probable deaths.

The number of new confirmed cases by county are listed below.

Aiken (6), Anderson (7), Beaufort (29), Berkeley (5), Calhoun (1), Charleston (35), Chester (2), Chesterfield (2), Cherokee (2), Colleton (2), Clarendon (6), Darlington (6), Dillon (4), Dorchester (8), Fairfield (2), Florence (22), Georgetown (22), Greenville (77), Greenwood (5), Horry (120), Jasper (1), Kershaw (10), Lancaster (11), Laurens (5), Lexington (35), Marion (5), Marlboro (4), Newberry (2), Oconee (3), Orangeburg (6), Pickens (20), Richland (57), Saluda (2), Spartanburg (22), Sumter (5), Williamsburg (7), York (19)

The number of new probable cases are listed below.

Richland (2)

According to DHEC, South Carolina now has a higher case rate per 100,000 people than Georgia.

Probable cases and deaths

DHEC began this week reporting probable cases and probable deaths in regard to COVID-19.

This makes South Carolina the 23rd state in the country to follow recent recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to report this information.

There are currently zero probable deaths in the state, and five cumulative probable cases: June 14, York County (1); June 15, Lexington (1) and Richland (1) counties; June 16, Richland County (2). This new information is available on our Testing Data & Projections webpage.

  • A confirmed case is an individual who had a confirmatory viral test performed by way of a throat or nose swab and that specimen tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, which is the virus that causes COVID-19. A positive viral test, also called a PCR test or molecular test, alone is enough to classify a confirmed case.
  • A probable case is an individual who has not had a confirmatory viral test performed but has:

1. epidemiologic evidence and clinical evidence of infection, or

2. a positive antibody blood test and either epidemiologic evidence or clinical evidence. (A positive antibody test alone is currently not a reliable method for diagnosing a COVID-19 infection.)

  • A confirmed death is someone whose death is related to COVID-19 and who tested positive with a confirmatory viral test for COVID-19.
  • A probable death is an individual whose death certificate lists COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death but did not undergo confirmatory viral testing.

A new webpage provides information about probable cases and deaths and will be updated to reflect the most current CDC recommendations for reporting this new information.

Testing in South Carolina
As of Tuesday, a total of 304,431 tests have been conducted in the state. See a detailed breakdown of tests in South Carolina on the Data and Projections webpage. DHEC’s Public Health Laboratory is operating extended hours and is testing specimens seven days a week. The Public Health Laboratory’s current timeframe for providing results to health care providers is 24-48 hours.

Percent Positive Test Trends among Reported COVID-19 Cases
The total number of individuals tested yesterday statewide was 4,409 (not including antibody tests) and the percent positive was 13.1%. When the percent positive is low, it may indicate that more widespread testing is being performed and the percent positive may more accurately reflect how much disease is present in the community.

The 7-day average of cases reported is higher than it has ever been.

  • Today 687.7
  • One week ago 447.4
  • One month ago 176.1

More than 75 Mobile Testing Clinics Scheduled Statewide
As part of DHEC’s ongoing efforts to increase testing in underserved and rural communities across the state, the agency is working with community partners to set up mobile testing clinics that bring testing to these communities. Currently, there are 78 mobile testing events scheduled through July 18 with new testing events added regularly. Find a mobile testing clinic event near you at scdhec.gov/covid19mobileclinics.

Residents can also get tested at one of 173 permanent COVID-19 testing facilities across the state. Visit scdhec.gov/covid19testingfor more information.

Hospital Bed Occupancy
As of Wednesday morning, 3,087 inpatient hospital beds are available and 7,411 are in use, which is a 70.59% statewide hospital bed utilization rate. Of the 7,411 inpatient beds currently used, 607 are occupied by patients who have either tested positive or are under investigation for COVID-19.

7-day average of deaths, hospitalizations

The 7-day average of deaths reported rose to 6. It was below 6 yesterday for the first time since May 22.

How South Carolinians Can Stop the Spread
Evidence is increasing about the high rates of infection in people who do not have symptoms and don’t know they are infectious. This places everyone at risk of getting the virus or unknowingly transmitting it to someone else. Steps people can take to protect ourselves and others include:

  • Practicing social distancing
  • Wearing a mask in public
  • Avoiding group gatherings
  • Regularly washing your hands
  • Staying home if sick

For the latest information related to COVID-19 visit scdhec.gov/COVID19.Visit scdmh.net for stress, anxiety and mental health resources from the S.C. Department of Mental Health.

*As new information is provided to the department, some changes in cases may occur. Cases are reported based on the person’s county of residence, as it is provided to the department. DHEC’s COVID-19 map will adjust to reflect any reclassified cases.

Additional coronavirus resources:

Sign up for WYFF News 4 coronavirus daily newsletter

Uncategorized

Union County voluntarily returns to Phase 1 following Oregon’s largest outbreak – OregonLive

June 17th, 2020

Union County, the rural northeastern Oregon county home to the state’s largest coronavirus outbreak, voluntarily returned to Phase 1 of Gov. Kate Brown’s coronavirus reopening plan Wednesday. 

The county is the first in Oregon to step backward under the governor’s gradual reopening guidelines. The move came after the county recorded a giant spike in coronavirus cases, from 22 on Sunday to 242 as of Wednesday. 

Union County had entered Phase 2 of Brown’s reopening plan June 5. Under stricter Phase 1 regulations, gatherings are limited to 25 people or fewer, and churches are not allowed to meet in large groups. 

State public health officials have linked the county’s outbreak to Lighthouse Pentecostal Church in Island City, next to La Grande. 

The Northeast Oregon Joint Information Center, which helps coordinate Union County’s emergency response, issued a statement Wednesday explaining the county’s decision to return to Phase 1.

“This decision was made due to the significant rise in confirmed COVID-19 case numbers, concerns for the protection of the community, and concerns for impacts to Grande Ronde Hospital,” the statement said.  

“Voluntary adherence by citizens will apply to individuals, businesses and organizations, although many have already voluntarily returned to the Phase 1 guidance.”

Union County has a population of about 27,000. La Grande is the hub of the county, said Suzannah Moore-Hemann, executive director of the Union County Chamber of Commerce.

She believes voluntarily moving back to Phase 1 is a good idea for the community’s safety, but said the move will be painful for the economy.

“We just entered Phase 2 two weeks ago,” Moore-Hemann said. “That’s not even enough time to start generating revenue to make up for the first closure. I’m sure a lot of the businesses are going back to experiencing a really drastically reduced revenue stream.”

The chamber serves as a source of information, and Moore-Hemann said the ever-changing news means she doesn’t have all the answers to the questions that business owners are asking.

“It’s really anxiety inducing — the unknown, feeling the stress and hardship for our businesses,” Moore-Hemann said. “You almost feel helpless when you’re thinking, ‘I wish there was more that we can do.’ I wish I could give more concrete answers.‘”

Gabi McCauley grew up and lives in Union County and worked as a nurse for 12 years in nursing homes and long-term care facilities. She said in a small community like La Grande, the high volume of cases could devastate the community.

“It’s just going to be so bad if they don’t get it under control,” McCauley said.

State and county public health officials say they are taking steps to stop the virus from spreading far beyond Lighthouse Pentecostal Church. 

Tom Jeanne, the state’s deputy epidemiologist, said Tuesday that at least 236 cases are linked to the church.

Despite the severity of the outbreak, Tim Heider, a spokesman for the Oregon Health Authority, said the state was confident in the number of case investigators and contact tracers it had responding to the outbreak.

Most congregants have already been tested for the virus. Contact tracers are working to identify close contacts of those congregants that may have been exposed, but Heider could not say how many close contacts would be tested for the virus.

Jeanne said the Oregon Health Authority provided 10 employees to help the county’s five contact tracers. He said two of those state workers were on the ground in Union County and the other eight were working remotely. Neighboring counties are also helping, he said.

Joseph Fiumara, county public health director for Umatilla County, said his county was contacted by Union County Friday and asked whether they would be able to offer support as the county grappled with what was growing into a serious outbreak.

“We have put that offer out there, and we are willing and able to provide some support if they need us,” Fiumara said.

Union County hasn’t recorded any deaths from coronavirus so far, but McCauley and other residents are worried that will change. So far, at least five people have been hospitalized, officials have said.

Jeanne said if capacity becomes a concern at the local Grand Ronde Hospital, state officials will work to transfer patients to other hospitals in eastern Oregon, Portland or Boise.

The governor expressed support for Union County’s decision to move back to Phase 1 in a statement issued by her office. 

“We support local officials in their decision to safeguard the public health of county residents,” said Charles Boyle, a spokesman for Brown.

Leaders from Lighthouse Pentecostal Church have not responded to various and repeated attempts at communication from The Oregonian/OregonLive. One faith leader declined to speak Tuesday.

The church’s Facebook page posted a video Tuesday morning, in which Pastor James Parker held a morning devotional prayer and seemed to address the COVID-19 pandemic, without acknowledging it by name.

“I appreciate everybody being cooperative with what was decided and doing your best to help,” Parker said in the video. “In the end, our fruit will show that what we’re doing is the right thing, and more people need to do what we did. The more people that do the right thing, the easier it’s going to be for the rest of the world to combat this pandemic that we’re going through.”

Parker did not further explain what “the right thing” is, and the church did not respond to a request for clarification.

A now-deleted Facebook post from late May explained the church was going to reopen its doors to congregants Memorial Day weekend “in accordance” with President Donald Trump’s demands that states allow churches to open.

A second Facebook post that has also been deleted showed hundreds of worshipers dancing, singing and moving around in close proximity in a video uploaded May 24. 

The decision to open the church’s doors came amid statewide pressure from some faith leaders to resume services.

Ten churches sued the governor in early May, arguing that her social distancing guidelines were no longer justified. A Baker County Circuit Judge ruled in favor of the churches and stood by his decision on May 26, declaring Brown’s orders “null and void.” The Oregon Supreme Court ordered the judge to throw out his preliminary injunction June 12.

Boyle, the governor’s spokesman, said Brown hasn’t set out plans to cite churches that do not follow stay-home restrictions.

“Any enforcement decisions would be made at the local level,” Boyle said in an email. “However, at this time, our focus is on making sure that members of the community are getting access to the health care they need and that the county has the resources it needs to address this outbreak.”

McCauley said she hopes pastors who decided to hold services against Brown’s orders will be cited.

“Point to me in the Bible where Jesus said go out and infect everybody,” McCauley said. 

Henry Larson, another Union County resident, said other churches and local groups followed the stay-home restrictions, and the decision to reopen Lighthouse Pentecostal Church was not broadly supported among local residents.

“As a fellow religious person, it shocks me to know that they would put their needs above the safety and wellbeing of the entire community,” Larson said. 

— Celina Tebor

ctebor@oregonian.com

@CelinaTebor

Jamie Goldberg | jgoldberg@oregonian.com | @jamiebgoldberg

Uncategorized

Sony’s slick PS5 reveal graphics are almost certainly from this Russian media artist – The Verge

June 17th, 2020

Trudeau government passes confidence test with support from New Democrats – CBC.ca

June 17th, 2020

The federal Liberal government avoided defeat with help from the NDP on Wednesday as the two joined forces to pass a multibillion-dollar spending bill in the House of Commons and avoid a summer election.

The result had been considered a foregone conclusion after the Liberals assured the New Democrats’ support — and their own survival — by extending Tuesday the $2,000-a-month Canada Emergency Response Benefit another eight weeks.

In return, the NDP supported the government in passing the supplementary spending estimates — some $87 billion in planned government spending, most of which is aimed at pandemic-related support for Canadians and businesses.

Only about $6 billion actually involves new spending; the other $81 billion had already been approved by Parliament.

Because the Liberals hold only a minority of seats in the House of Commons, they needed the support of at least one party to pass the spending bill or risk plunging the country into an election.

Any bill involving government spending is typically considered a confidence matter. A government that fails to win a vote of confidence in the Commons is deemed defeated.

“The prime minister says he has heard us and is extending support through CERB through the summer,” NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said in a statement prior to the estimates being approved.

“This is what we were calling for in the short term. We’ll keep working to make sure help is there for Canadians who need it in the long term.”

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said he decided to support the Liberal spending bill after Trudeau extended the CERB over the summer months. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)

Trudeau announced Tuesday that the CERB would be extended to a maximum of 24 weeks instead of 16 weeks for people who lost their jobs or saw their hours slashed due to the pandemic.

The extension means the first cohort of applicants who signed up in April and were set to max out their payment periods in early July won’t have to worry if they have no jobs to go back to over the summer or are unable to work because of health reasons.

Promised disability support still in limbo

Yet while the supplementary estimates were approved — on division, which means with some opposition but no recorded vote — there was still no resolution to an emergency aid bill that stalled last week as the government butted heads with opposition parties.

That bill included measures to deliver a one-time, tax-free benefit of up to $600 to Canadians with disabilities, an expansion
to the wage subsidy program and fines or jail time for Canadians who deliberately defraud the CERB program.

The government needed unanimous consent to quickly pass the bill in a matter of hours last week but none of the opposition parties would support it.

It then offered to deal with the disability benefit separately, which was supported by the NDP and the Bloc but the Conservatives blocked that idea.

The bill remained on the order paper Wednesday, meaning the government could have theoretically tried again, but that wasn’t in the cards.

The government will instead try to work out other ways to deliver the disability benefit and other measures without needing
legislation.

Singh ejected, UN bid rejected

The approval of the supplementary estimates followed almost five hours of parliamentary debate that was preceded by Singh being kicked out of the House of Commons for calling a Bloc Quebecois MP racist over an NDP motion on systemic racism in the RCMP.

Watch | NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh calls BQ MP a racist, expelled from Commons

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh called Bloc Quebecois MP Alain Therrien a ‘racist’ and refused to retract the accusation. The Bloc had stopped Singh’s motion on systemic racism in the RCMP from passing. 4:08

The debate coincided with news that Canada had lost its bid to win a temporary seat at the United Nations’ Security Council, which prompted several sharp exchanges between the Conservatives and Liberals over the cost of the campaign.

The prime minister was not present for the proceedings, which mark the end of an unprecedented parliamentary sitting that saw the House of Commons — like much of the rest of the country — all but shut down because of COVID-19.

Trudeau instead left it to his ministers to respond to opposition questions and concerns, including Conservative complaints about a lack of transparency and accountability over the government’s response to the pandemic.

The Conservatives and Bloc had been calling for the resumption of Parliament rather than the special COVID-19 committee that has been holding hybrid hearings for the past few weeks with some MPs attending in person and others virtually.

The Liberals announced Wednesday that they will provide a “snapshot” of the country’s economy on July 8.

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations

Bot Mafias Have Wreaked Havoc in ‘World of Warcraft Classic’ – WIRED

June 17th, 2020

The Merrell Twins’ Super Cute Island Tour – Animal Crossing: New Horizons – IGN

June 17th, 2020

Coronavirus in Oregon: 183 now dead as health officials report 122 new cases – OregonLive

June 17th, 2020

The Oregon Health Authority on Wednesday reported one new death from the novel coronavirus, bringing the toll to 183, as known cases climbed to 6,218.

A 95-year-old Clackamas County woman was the latest to succumb to the illness, health officials said. She had underlying medical conditions.

In the last 24 hours, the state recorded 122 new confirmed and presumptive coronavirus cases.

They were in 15 of Oregon’s 36 counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (17), Deschutes (2), Jackson (2) Josephine (2), Klamath (3), Lake (1), Lincoln (3), Marion (17), Morrow (1), Multnomah (34), Polk (1), Umatilla (12), Union (2), Washington (22).

Coronavirus in Oregon: Latest news | Live map tracker |Text alerts | Newsletter

County case totals: Two counties — Multnomah and Marion — have more than 1,000 coronavirus cases each. Eight additional counties — Clackamas, Deschutes, Lincoln, Linn, Polk, Umatilla, Union and Washington — have reported 100 coronavirus cases or more. Gilliam and Wheeler have reported none.

Here’s the overall count — confirmed and presumptive cases — by county: Baker (1), Benton (66), Clackamas (526), Clatsop (46), Columbia (22), Coos (32), Crook (9), Curry (7), Deschutes (139), Douglas (29), Grant (1), Harney (1), Hood River, (82), Jackson (85), Jefferson (69), Josephine (26), Klamath (64), Lake (6), Lane (90), Lincoln (226), Linn (125), Malheur (38), Marion (1,218), Morrow (18), Multnomah (1,632), Polk (128), Sherman (1), Tillamook (6), Umatilla (193), Union (242), Wallowa (4), Wasco (42), Washington (950) and Yamhill (94).

Oregon’s Latino population has been disproportionately hit hard by the coronavirus. Though Latinos make up 13% of the state’s population, they represent at least 35% of all positive cases.

Death toll: At least 183 people have died from the virus. They are from 13 counties — 68 people from Multnomah, 31 from Marion, 20 from Clackamas, 20 from Washington, 12 from Polk, nine from Linn, eight from Yamhill, five from Benton, four from Umatilla, three from Lane, one each from Josephine, Malheur and Wasco.

Their ages ranged from 36 to 100. Among them, 105 men and 78 women have died. All but four had underlying medical conditions.

The breakdown of deaths by age: ages 30-39 (1), ages 40-49 (3), ages 50-59 (8), ages 60-69 (38), ages 70-79 (51), ages 80-plus (82).

[Read about Oregon coronavirus deaths. Help us learn more.]

Senior care homes: Six in 10 of all coronavirus deaths in Oregon — 111 — are associated with a care center, state data shows. More than 750 senior care home residents, staff, close contacts and others connected to at least 86 nursing, assisted and retirement homes have contracted COVID-19. One care home worker has died.

Workplace outbreaks: At least 980 coronavirus infections — or nearly 16% of all cases — are linked to workplace outbreaks identified by the Oregon Health Authority. Among them: The Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem (176), Pacific Seafood in Newport (145) and Duckwall Fruit in Hood River (61).

Testing: Another 4,802 people received coronavirus test results in the last day, up from the previous day’s 3,396, according to figures published on the Oregon Health Authority’s website.

So far, 184,139 Oregonians have been tested for the illness since the state confirmed its first case on Feb. 28.

Oregon’s positive test rate for COVID-19 is currently 3.3%, far below the 12% national average.

Ages: Cases are so far spread evenly among people in their 20s (18%), people in their 30s (18%), people in their 40s (17%) and people in their 50s (16%).

The breakdown: 0-9 (183), ages 10-19 (392), ages 20-29 (1,129), ages 30-39 (1,095), ages 40-49 (1,028), ages 50-59 (966), ages 60-69 (689), ages 70-79 (423), ages 80-plus (303).

Gender: 3,193 cases are among women, or 51%, and 3,008, or 49%, are among men.

Hospitalizations: At least 929 of the state’s COVID-19 patients, or 15%, have been hospitalized at some point during their illness, according to the health authority.

Most — at least 689 — have been 50 or older.

The hospitalizations breakdown by age: 0-9 (7), ages 10-19 (4), ages 20-29 (45), ages 30-39 (72), ages 40-49 (109), ages 50-59 (168), ages 60-69 (203), ages 70-79 (183), ages 80-plus (135).

Currently, 85 people with confirmed coronavirus cases are hospitalized, up from 80 the previous day. Thirty-eight are in intensive care and 22 on ventilators.

Recoveries: At least 2,489 COVID-19 patients have recovered from the illness, or 41%, the health authority said.

Nationwide: Confirmed coronavirus cases stood at more than 2.1 million. The death toll climbed past 117,000.

— Shane Dixon Kavanaugh; 503-294-7632

Email at skavanaugh@oregonian.com

Follow on Twitter @shanedkavanaugh

Subscribe to Oregonian/OregonLive newsletters and podcasts for the latest news and top stories

Uncategorized

New Pokemon Snap Coming To Nintendo Switch – IGN Daily Fix – IGN

June 17th, 2020

Coronavirus live news: Brazil Covid-19 cases near 1m as WHO hails steroid treatment ‘hope’ – The Guardian

June 17th, 2020

As coronavirus cases surge across the state, Arizona’s Republican governor said he would no longer block mayors from being able to require local residents to wear masks.

But governor Doug Ducey held off from issuing a statewide mask-wearing requirement, even after hundreds of Arizona medical professionals sent him an open letter this week, outlining the evidence that masks save lives and asking him to require citizens to wear them.

Mask-wearing has become a charged partisan issue in Arizona, one of the key swing states in the 2020 election. Donald Trump is expected to visit the state for a rally next week, even as coronavirus cases and deaths are rising rapidly.

For days, the Democratic mayors of Phoenix and Tucson, the state’s two largest cities, have been speaking out, asking Ducey to change the executive order that has blocked them from mandating any public health guidelines in addition to the ones that the governor himself had approved.

Uncategorized