Archive

Archive for July 11th, 2020

Ubisoft sexual harassment probe claims three more executives – The Guardian

July 11th, 2020

Patient dies after catching coronavirus at ‘COVID party’ in Texas – The Jerusalem Post

July 11th, 2020

A patient in their 30s who contracted the novel coronavirus at a “COVID party” in San Antonio, Texas, passed away from the virus, local NBC affiliate WOAI/KABB reported.A COVID party is a party hosted by a diagnosed COVID-19 patient to see if guests get infected. According to Methodist Healthcare’s chief medical officer Dr. Jane Appleby, the core idea of these parties is to see if the virus is real.”Just before the patient died, they looked at their nurse and said ‘I think I made a mistake, I thought this was a hoax, but it’s not,'” Appleby said, according to WOAI/KABB.Other states have also seen COVID parties being held, such as Washington state and Alabama.COVID-19 cases in Texas, including in Bexar County, where San Antonio is, have spiked considerably in recent days as the pandemic continues to worsen throughout the US. In Bexar County, positive coronavirus tests spiked to 22%.”This is a concerning increase from a positive rate of about five percent only several weeks ago,” Appleby explained, according to WOAI/KABB.The coronavirus “doesn’t discriminate and none of us are invincible,” she added, according to the report. “I don’t want to be an alarmist, and we’re just trying to share some real-world examples to help our community realize that this virus is very serious and can spread easily.”

Uncategorized

Devolver made a free game about a canceled game convention – Engadget

July 11th, 2020

Coronavirus deaths take a long-expected turn for the worse – MSN Money

July 11th, 2020


COVID-19 antibody testing and diagnostic testing are administered at a converted vehicle inspection station, Tuesday, July 7, 2020, in San Antonio. Local officials across Texas say their hospitals are becoming increasingly stretched and are in danger of becoming overrun as cases of the coronavirus surge. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
© Provided by Associated Press COVID-19 antibody testing and diagnostic testing are administered at a converted vehicle inspection station, Tuesday, July 7, 2020, in San Antonio. Local officials across Texas say their hospitals are becoming increasingly stretched and are in danger of becoming overrun as cases of the coronavirus surge. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

NEW YORK (AP) — A long-expected upturn in U.S. coronavirus deaths has begun, driven by fatalities in states in the South and West, according to data on the pandemic.

The number of deaths per day from the virus had been falling for months, and even remained down as states like Florida and Texas saw explosions in cases and hospitalizations — and reported daily U.S. infections broke records several times in recent days.

Scientists warned it wouldn’t last. A coronavirus death, when it occurs, typically comes several weeks after a person is first infected. And experts predicted states that saw increases in cases and hospitalizations would, at some point, see deaths rise too. Now that’s happening.

“It’s consistently picking up. And it’s picking up at the time you’d expect it to,” said William Hanage, a Harvard University infectious diseases researcher.

According to an Associated Press analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University, the seven-day rolling average for daily reported deaths in the U.S. has increased from 578 two weeks ago to 664 on July 10 — still well below the heights hit in April. Daily reported deaths increased in 27 states over that time period, but the majority of those states are averaging under 15 new deaths per day. A smaller group of states has been driving the nationwide increase in deaths.

California is averaging 91 reported deaths per day while Texas is close behind with 66, but Florida, Arizona, Illinois, New Jersey and South Carolina also saw sizable rises. New Jersey’s recent jump is thought to be partially attributable to its less frequent reporting of probable deaths.

The impact has already been felt by families who lost kin — and by the health care workers who tried to save them.

Rublas Ruiz, a Miami intensive care unit nurse, recently broke down in tears during a birthday dinner with his wife and daughter. He said he was overcome by the number of patients who have died in his care.

“I counted like 10 patients in less than four days in our ICU and then I stopped doing that because there were so many,” said the 41-year-old nurse at Kendall Regional Medical Center who lost another patient Monday.

FILE - In this June 27, 2020, file photo, medical personnel prepare to test hundreds of people lined up in vehicles in Phoenix's western neighborhood of Maryvalefor free COVID-19 tests organized by Equality Health Foundation, which focuses on care in underserved communities. The personal protective gear that was in dangerously short supply during the initial weeks of the coronavirus crisis in the U.S. is running out again as the virus resumes its rapid spread and the number of hospitalized patients climbs. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)

FILE – In this June 27, 2020, file photo, medical personnel prepare to test hundreds of people lined up in vehicles in Phoenix’s western neighborhood of Maryvalefor free COVID-19 tests organized by Equality Health Foundation, which focuses on care in underserved communities. The personal protective gear that was in dangerously short supply during the initial weeks of the coronavirus crisis in the U.S. is running out again as the virus resumes its rapid spread and the number of hospitalized patients climbs. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)

© Provided by Associated Press

The virus has killed more than 130,000 people in the U.S. and more than a half-million worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins University, though the true numbers are believed to be higher.

Deaths first began mounting in the U.S. in March. About two dozen deaths were being reported daily in the middle of that month. By late in the month, hundreds were being reported each day, and in April thousands. Most happened in New York, New Jersey and elsewhere in the Northeast.

Deaths were so high there because it was a new virus tearing through a densely populated area, and it quickly swept through vulnerable groups of people in nursing homes and other places, said Perry Halkitis, the dean of the Rutgers University School of Public Health in New Jersey.

Many of the infections occurred before government officials imposed stay-at-home orders and other social-distancing measures. The daily death toll started falling in mid-April — and continued to fall until about a week ago.

Researchers now expect deaths to rise for at least some weeks, but some think the count probably will not go up as dramatically as it did in the spring — for several reasons.

First, testing was extremely limited early in the pandemic, and it’s become clear that unrecognized infections were spreading on subways, in nursing homes and in other public places before anyone knew exactly what was going on. Now testing is more widespread, and the magnitude of outbreaks is becoming better understood.

Second, many people’s health behaviors have changed, with mask-wearing becoming more common in some places. Although there is no vaccine yet, hospitals are also getting better at treating patients.

Another factor, tragically, is that deadly new viruses often tear through vulnerable populations first, such as the elderly and people already weakened by other health conditions. That means that, in the Northeast at least, “many of the vulnerable people have already died,” Halkitis said.

Now, the U.S. is likely in for “a much longer, slower burn,” Hanage, the Harvard researcher, said. “We’re not going to see as many deaths (as in the spring). But we’re going to see a total number of deaths, which is going to be large.”

In other virus-related developments:

— Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom and Animal Kingdom are reopening Saturday; Epcot and Disney’s Hollywood Studios will follow four days later. The move comes as there has been a surge in the number of Floridians testing positive for the coronavirus and the state set a record of nearly 500 confirmed deaths in a week.

— The number of New Yorkers hospitalized with the coronavirus — 799 — has fallen to the lowest point since March 18. But Gov. Andrew Cuomo fears a resurgence in cases is inevitable amid outbreaks in other states.

Kristin Urquiza is worried things may get dramatically worse soon in at least some American cities, like Phoenix, where her 65-year-old father died recently.

When the dangers of the virus first became known, Mark Anthony Urquiza, a quality assurance inspector, took precautions such as wearing a face mask and staying home as much as possible, his daughter said.

But that changed after Gov. Doug Ducey ended Arizona’s stay-at-home order on May 15, eased restrictions on businesses, and initially blocked local lawmakers from requiring residents to wear masks.

By June 11, the elder Urquiza had developed a fever and cough. He was hospitalized and eventually placed on a ventilator. He died June 30.

“His life was robbed. I believe that terrible leadership and flawed policies put my father’s life in the balance,” Kristin Urquiza said in an interview with The Associated Press.

Ducey, a Republican, has more recently changed direction, closing many businesses and allowing mayors to make mask-wearing mandatory.

But Kristin Urquiza is worried. Her father received the care at a time when beds in intensive care units were readily available. Now some Arizona ICUs are becoming swamped.

“Other families are not going to be reassured the hospitals will have the capacity to give (coronavirus) victims the dignity and the health care that they deserve. And that breaks my heart,” she said.

___

Associated Press writers Kelli Kennedy in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and Jamie Stengle in Dallas contributed to this report.

___

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Uncategorized

Ubisoft’s “most powerful creative force” resigns in wake of sweeping allegations – Ars Technica

July 11th, 2020

Super Tuned AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT vs. Intel i5-10600K: RAM Timings & Infinity Fabric Overclocks – Gamers Nexus

July 11th, 2020

Ubisoft executives resign amid sexual misconduct allegations – Gamasutra

July 11th, 2020

Search for ‘Glee’ actress Naya Rivera continues Saturday at Lake Piru – VC Star

July 11th, 2020
CLOSE

With ‘Glee’ actress Naya Rivera presumed dead by officials, the search for her body continues at Lake Piru on Thursday. Ventura County Star

The Ventura County Sheriff’s Office continued the search for “Glee” actress Naya Rivera on Saturday, four days after her initial disappearance at Lake Piru.

As of 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Rivera, 33, had not been located, according to investigators.

Earlier in the day, Rivera’s mother and brother visited the lake to pay their respects. Authorities have been working closely with the family over the course of the investigation, according to Sgt. Marta Bugarin, a public information officer with the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office.

“They’re obviously devastated, grieving,” Bugarin said. “Our goal is to try and bring some closure to the family today.”

Rivera is presumed to have drowned in the lake after she rented a boat Wednesday afternoon with her 4-year-old son, Josey Dorsey. Boaters found the child alone on the boat hours later with Rivera’s purse, wallet and life jacket on board. He told investigators he saw his mother jump into the water but not come out.

News: ‘Glee’ cast, friends offer prayers for Naya Rivera after Lake Piru disappearance

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

A search mission for Rivera launched Wednesday and later turned into a recovery operation after she was presumed to have drowned. Helicopters have been used to search the surface of the water and the shoreline of the lake, while divers, cadaver dogs and sonar equipment have searched for her body underwater.

Saturday’s search will resume at daybreak Sunday. The Ventura County Sheriff’s Office was assisted with their search efforts by members of the Tulare and San Luis Obispo sheriff’s agencies as well as a private contractor, Bugarin said.

Rivera is best known for her role as Santana Lopez in the Fox sitcom “Glee,” which ran from 2009 to 2015.

Previous: Friday’s search for ‘Glee’ star Naya Rivera ‘much more technological’

Jeremy Childs is a breaking news and public safety reporter covering the night shift for the Ventura County Star. He can be reached by calling 805-437-0208 or emailing jeremy.childs@vcstar.com. You can also find him on Twitter @Jeremy_Childs.

Read or Share this story: https://www.vcstar.com/story/news/local/2020/07/11/naya-rivera-body-search-lake-piru-continues-for-glee-actress/5421908002/

Uncategorized

“I had to stuff my nose with tissue because the smell of blood”: B.C. rally calls for changes to wellness checks – CTV News

July 11th, 2020

VANCOUVER — Supporters of Mona Wang, the UBC nursing student who was allegedly dragged and stepped on by an RCMP officer during a wellness check, spoke out at Vancouver rally Saturday.

Among them was Wang’s roommate Shayla Raine.

Raine explained that she wasn’t home on the January night when security video captured Kelowna RCMP officer Cpl. Lacy Browning executing the now controversial wellness check at her apartment.

“When I came back and opened the suite it looked like a crime scene,” she said. “I had to stuff my nose with tissue because the smell of blood.”

Troubling video of the incident emerged in June, prompting the head of B.C. RCMP’s southeast division to issue an apology to Mona Wang.

“When I first saw the video I was deeply concerned. And I’m very sorry to Ms. Wang for what occurred,” said Chief Superintendent Brad Haugli on July 2.

Mona Wang has launched a lawsuit claiming she was assaulted and abused by Browning who was dispatched to Wang’s residence to check on her wellbeing.

Surveillance video shows a handcuffed Wang, dressed only in a bra and leggings, being dragged facedown by her wrists and arms down a hallway and through the building’s lobby by the female officer.

No video has emerged to show what took place in the apartment but Raine believes much of the alleged assault happened out of view of cameras.

“Mona could not have possibly gotten broken blood vessels in her eyes or bruises on all of her legs and abdomen from only being dragged down the carpet or having her head stepped on or hair pulled,” Raine said.

“There was definitely more that happened inside the apartment and it was evidently clear from the crime scene I had to clean up.”

At the Vancouver rally close to 100 people also gathered to support Wang’s advocacy for an end to wellness checks without mental health professionals present.

None of the allegations against Browning have been proven in court. The RCMP has said a code of conduct review and a criminal investigation is underway.

“The RCMP will also be asking an outside police department to independently review the findings of our criminal investigation once completed,” Staff-Sgt. Janelle Shoihet of the B.C. RCMP previously told CTV News Vancouver.

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations

Regret installing the iOS 14 or iPadOS 14 public beta? Go back to iOS 13 – CNET

July 11th, 2020