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Xbox Series S Will Not Run Xbox One X Enhanced Versions of Backwards Compatible Games – IGN – IGN

September 12th, 2020

Man dies after being stabbed in the neck in Rexdale – Toronto Star

September 12th, 2020

A man has died after a stabbing in Rexdale on Saturday evening, Toronto police say.

Officers were called to the area of Rexdale Boulevard and Bergamot Avenue, police said in a tweet just after 9 p.m.

The International Muslims Organization mosque is located at that intersection, which is close to Islington Avenue.

Police report the victim was laying on the ground when they arrived and described “lots of blood” from trauma to the head, including stab wounds to his neck.

He was pronounced dead at the scene.

The suspect fled the scene on foot. Police described him as slim, wearing a black hoodie and pants.

The homicide unit has taken over the investigation.

Anyone with information is asked to contact police at 416-808-5100 or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-TIPS.

This is the third homicide of the day in the city. A man and woman were stabbed at their Weston home Saturday afternoon. Police say the death of a man struck by a train nearby is connected.

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Trump officials seek greater control over CDC reports on coronavirus – msnNOW

September 12th, 2020

How Trump has undercut the CDC on coronavirus

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Political appointees at the Department of Health and Human Services have sought to change, delay and prevent the release of reports about the coronavirus by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because they were viewed as undermining President Trump’s message that the pandemic is under control.

Michael Caputo, the top HHS spokesman, said in an interview Saturday that he and one of his advisers have been seeking greater scrutiny of the CDC’s weekly scientific dispatches, known as the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, for the past 3½ months. The adviser, Paul Alexander, has sent repeated emails to the CDC seeking changes and demanding that the reports be halted until he could make edits.

The emails, first reported late Friday by Politico, describe the CDC documents, widely known as the MMWR, as being “hit pieces on the administration.” Caputo confirmed the authenticity of the emails.

The emails echo the sentiments from an earlier attack by Alexander, reported in The Washington Post in July, about an MMWR on the potential risk of the coronavirus to pregnant women. In that email, Alexander also accused the CDC of undermining the president. The emails are the latest evidence of how the nation’s top public health agency is coming under intense pressure from Trump and his allies, who are playing down the dangers of the pandemic ahead of the Nov. 3 presidential election.

“Most often, the MMWRs are [issued] for purely scientific reasons,” Caputo said Saturday. “But in an election year, and in the time of covid-19, it’s no longer unanimously scientific. There’s political content.”


a man wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a crowd: Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, shown on the South Lawn of the White House during the Republican National Convention, has sought a clearer picture of the activities of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Alex Brandon/AP)
© Alex Brandon/AP Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, shown on the South Lawn of the White House during the Republican National Convention, has sought a clearer picture of the activities of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Alex Brandon/AP)

Caputo said his conclusions are based on reviews by Alexander, an assistant professor at McMaster University in Canada and a specialist in health research methods. Caputo hired him this spring to advise on the science of the pandemic.

Despite the changes to the MMWRs sought by HHS, the requests were “infrequently” accepted by the CDC, Caputo said. 

Alexander “gets into productive discussions with the scientists who are open to criticism. They’re free to reject them,” Caputo said. “I think most of his criticisms are rejected.”

He added: “Science is disagreements. It must be difficult for [CDC] to be criticized by an Oxford-educated scientist who has been published in peer-reviewed journals 67 times.”

A former administration official with direct knowledge of the communications from HHS said a request that all reports be stopped until Alexander could review them in their entirety was rejected. On other requests, the CDC “put its head down” and did not comply and “continued to get in trouble over and over again” for doing so, the former official said. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity to share sensitive deliberations.

MMWRs are written by career experts for scientists and public health specialists and are considered among the most authoritative public health reports because they provide evidence-based information on a range of health topics. The reports are independent scientific publications that undergo rigorous vetting, often with multiple drafts to check data and methodology. The reports are closely held; few individuals at the CDC have access until just before publication.

The CDC editorial staff that produces the MMWRs typically sends one-paragraph summaries to HHS and other CDC officials a few days before publication.

“Whenever they come out with that list, there’s concern across [HHS] that some of the scholarship has been tainted by politics,” Caputo said. “That’s my opinion.”

Over the course of the pandemic, top officials including Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus task force response coordinator, and HHS Secretary Alex Azar have wanted to have a “more complete picture” of the CDC’s activity, according to an HHS official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to share internal deliberations. The MMWRs were the main focus, the official said.

“The future of the agency depends on its ability to disseminate science-based data and recommendations that are science-based,” the official said. “Putting a political lens on everything that we say is very concerning,” the official added. The CDC is not going to do that, the official said. There is no intention or attempt to undermine the president in the publication of CDC reports, the official said, referring to accusations by Alexander as “a paranoid assumption that is not based on anything.”

The CDC declined to comment Saturday.

One CDC report that drew particular scrutiny was on hydroxychloroquine. The MMWR urged clinicians to follow long-accepted prescribing guidelines for the malaria drug. Trump favored the drug as a coronavirus treatment despite scant evidence. The CDC was concerned the drug was potentially being misused to treat covid-19, the illness caused by the virus, and affecting supplies of the medication to treat conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.

“Current data on treatment and pre- or postexposure prophylaxis for COVID-19 indicate that the potential benefits of these drugs do not appear to outweigh their risks,” the report said.

The report had been delayed for weeks, according to a former administration official with direct knowledge of the efforts.

In another instance, a report about the spread of the coronavirus at a Georgia sleep-away camp was also delayed, the former official said. That report, issued July 31, suggested that children of all ages are susceptible to coronavirus infection and may spread it to others — a finding likely to intensify an already fraught discussion about the risks of sending children back to school. 

“That report gave them a lot of grief,” the former official said. “But you can’t change facts.” The report likely was delayed, the former official said, to avoid being released around the same time Trump was calling for schools to reopen in person. The changes that were sought were not included, the former official said.

The tone of Alexander’s emails is harsh, this person said, because the CDC ignored his requests. In one email, Alexander wrote to CDC Director Robert Redfield asking that the agency modify two already published reports that Alexander said mistakenly inflated the risks of coronavirus to children and undermined Trump’s push to reopen schools.

“CDC to me appears to be writing hit pieces on the administration,” Alexander wrote in an email. “CDC tried to report as if once kids get together, there will be spread and this will impact school reopening. … Very misleading by CDC and shame on them. Their aim is clear.”

The interference by HHS political appointees in the MMWR process has infuriated career scientists, who have been frustrated for months over the inability to allow scientists to fully share and explain information. 

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CDC study indicates kids in day care are bringing coronavirus home, new infections on the rise locally – St George News

September 12th, 2020

Photo illustration. | Photo by yaoinlove, iStock/Getty Images Plus, St. George News

NEW YORK (AP) — Children who caught the coronavirus at day cares and a day camp spread it to their relatives, according to a new report that underscores that kids can bring the germ home and infect others.

File photo of temperature screening and medical check at a school at an undisclosed location/date. | Photo by Maksym Belchenko, iStock/Getty Images Plus, St. George News

The study comes as Southern Utah and the state have seen their highest rate of new coronavirus infections since early August.

Scientists already know children can spread the virus. But the study published Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention using data from Utah “definitively indicates — in a way that previous studies have struggled to do — the potential for transmission to family members,” said William Hanage, a Harvard University infectious disease researcher.

The findings don’t mean that schools and child-care programs need to close, but it does confirm that the virus can spread within those places and then be brought home by kids. So, masks, disinfection and social distancing are needed. And people who work in such facilities have to be careful and get tested if they think they may be infected, experts said.

In the new study, researchers from Utah and the CDC focused on three outbreaks in Salt Lake City child care facilities between April and July. Two were child-care programs for toddlers, and the other was a camp for older kids. The average age of kids at all three programs was about 7.

At two of the facilities, investigators were able to establish that an infected adult worker unknowingly introduced the virus.

The study concluded 12 children caught the coronavirus at the facilities, and spread it to at least 12 of the 46 parents or siblings that they came in contact at home. Three of the infected children had no symptoms, and one of them spread it to a parent who was later hospitalized because of COVID-19, the researchers said.

That kind of rate of spread – about 25% – is on par with studies of spread in households that have included both children and adults. It also shows that children with no symptoms, or very mild symptoms, can spread the infection just like adults can.

Photo illustration. | Photo by Sarah Kilian, Unsplash, St. George News

Hanage cautioned that it’s not clear whether the findings at the three programs are broadly applicable. Also, the study didn’t involve genetic analysis of individual infections that might have given a clearer picture of how the disease spread.

But many infected kids experience mild illnesses and testing of children has been very limited, so it’s likely that more than 25% of the outside contacts were infected, Hanage added.

The epidemic could get worse and more complicated this fall, said Dr. David Kimberlin, a pediatric infectious diseases specialist at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

“This should be another wake-up call to all of us that we need to be diligent and all do our part,” he said.

After a week where it appeared the rate of new infections was on the wane in Southern Utah, the area saw it’s highest rate of new coronavirus infections in a month over the last two days, as has the state of Utah according to the Utah Department of Health and the Southwest Utah Public Health Department.

There have been more new infections in Washington County in the last two days – 47 – than the previous four days combined (42).

The increase in infections has gone beyond Washington County, which still bears the brunt of the new cases. Beaver County reported on Saturday its first new case since Aug. 9.

Hospitalizations remained unchanged and there have been no new local deaths reported since the death of a Washington County female older than 85 was reported Thursday.

St. George News weekend editor/reporter Chris Reed contributed to this story.

COVID-19 information resources

St. George News has made every effort to ensure the information in this story is accurate at the time it was written. However, as the situation and science surrounding the coronavirus continues to evolve, it’s possible that some data has changed.

We invite you to check the resources below for up-to-date information and resources.

Southern Utah coronavirus count (as of Sept. 12, 2020, seven-day average in parentheses)

Positive COVID-19 tests: 3,831 (15.9 new infections per day in seven days, dropping)

  • Washington County: 2,985 (12.7 per day, rising)
  • Iron County: 693 (2.1 per day, dropping)
  • Kane County: 73 (1.0 per day, steady)
  • Garfield County: 46 (0 per day, steady) 
  • Beaver County: 34 (0.1 per day, rising) 

Deaths: 29 (0.1 per day, dropping)

  • Washington County: 24 
  • Iron County: 2
  • Garfield County: 2
  • Kane County: 1

Hospitalized: 7 (steady)

Recovered: 3,424

Current Utah seven-day average: 421 (rising)

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Trump aides review CDC coronavirus reports to better align with president’s upbeat messaging: report – Fox News

September 12th, 2020

The president‘s political aides have successfully demanded to review and, in some cases, modify weekly Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports on the coronavirus to better align scientific reports with Trump’s upbeat messages, Politico reported.

Michael Caputo, a former Trump campaign official who became spokesperson at the Department of Health and Human Services this spring, and his team have led the effort to review the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports, the news outlet reported, citing three sources familiar with the situation and email exchanges. The reports are written by scientists to update the public health community on the coronavirus’ spread.

While CDC health professionals have resisted the most sweeping changes, they have increasingly allowed reviews of the reports, and in some cases edits and delays. Emails obtained by Politico show the political communications team at HHS concerned the CDC was “writing hit pieces on the administration” and scientists were trying to “hurt the President.”

The CDC did not immediately respond Saturday to a request for comment from Fox News.

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Caputo and aides have called to retroactively change agency reports that they said wrongly inflated coronavirus’ risk to children and undermined Trump’s push to reopen schools.

Former Trump campaign official Michael Caputo arrives at the Hart Senate Office building to be interviewed by Senate Intelligence Committee staffers, on May 1, 2018 in Washington. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Former Trump campaign official Michael Caputo arrives at the Hart Senate Office building to be interviewed by Senate Intelligence Committee staffers, on May 1, 2018 in Washington. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

They tried to halt the release of some CDC reports altogether and successfully delayed a report on hydroxychloroquine, the malaria drug touted by Trump to treat COVID-19 despite questionable evidence.

One political appointee, Paul Alexander, demanded CDC director Dr. Robert Redfield allow him to edit reports and wanted “an immediate” stop in the meantime.

“The reports must be read by someone outside of CDC like myself, and we cannot allow the reporting to go on as it has been, for it is outrageous. It’s lunacy,” Alexander, Caputo’s scientific adviser, told Redfield and other officials in an email obtained by Politico. “Nothing to go out unless I read and agree with the findings how they CDC, wrote it and I tweak it to ensure it is fair and balanced and ‘complete.'”

Caputo responded to Fox News’ request for comment on the Politico report by saying: “It’s accurate.”

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In a statement to Politico, Caputo touted Alexander’s qualifications as “an Oxford-educated epidemiologist.” The HHS team was appropriately reviewing the CDC’s reports and fighting the “deep state,” he said.

“Dr. Alexander advises me on pandemic policy and he has been encouraged to share his opinions with other scientists. Like all scientists, his advice is heard and taken or rejected by his peers,” Caputo said in a statement.

“Our intention is to make sure that evidence, science-based data drives policy through this pandemic—not ulterior deep state motives in the bowels of CDC,” Caputo added.

President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the press briefing room at the White House, Feb. 29, in Washington as Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci, Vice President Mike Pence, Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams listen. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the press briefing room at the White House, Feb. 29, in Washington as Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci, Vice President Mike Pence, Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams listen. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The reporting sent new shockwaves throughout Democratic and scientific circles with some calling for Caputo’s ouster.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., said Saturday that “political appointees trying to interfere in the COVID-19 response and suppress public health officials should be removed from their posts. Immediately.”

Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., blasted the “doctoring of CDC reports” on the virus and said the GOP “is unfit to govern and a threat to your life.”

HHS released a new statement Saturday that didn’t address the reporting on interfering with CDC reports, but praised Trump’s openmindedness to science.

“As the Secretary of Health and Human Services, I have briefed President Trump alongside the nation’s top doctors and I have insisted that he have direct access to these doctors throughout the COVID-19 pandemic,” HHS Secretary Alex Azar said in the statement to Fox News. “He has always been receptive to the data and science presented by me and other members of the task force. President Trump’s science-based decision making has saved lives.”

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Meanwhile, former vice president Joe Biden’s campaign pounced on the new report as further evidence the Trump administration will try to downplay the pandemic for political reasons. It also cited revelations from Bob Woodward’s new book that Trump knew how deadly the virus was in February, but did not stress its seriousness to the public at the time.

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden gives the thumbs up as he arrives to pose for photographs with union leaders outside the AFL-CIO headquarters in Harrisburg, Pa., Sept. 7. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden gives the thumbs up as he arrives to pose for photographs with union leaders outside the AFL-CIO headquarters in Harrisburg, Pa., Sept. 7. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

“When Donald Trump told Bob Woodward that he wanted to downplay the virus, this is the exact kind of repugnant betrayal that he meant,” Biden’s Deputy Campaign Manager and Communications Director Kate Bedingfield said in a statement. “Instead of telling us the truth about the deadly seriousness of COVID-19, this report is further proof that the Trump Administration has been systematically putting political optics ahead of the safety of the American people.”

But the Trump campaign said the country would have been worse off if Biden were president at the outset of the pandemic and touted Trump’s decision to announce travel restrictions from China as early as Jan. 31.

“President Trump has always listened to the scientists and medical professionals, like Dr. Fauci and Dr. Redfield, in crafting his unprecedented response to the coronavirus,” Trump campaign communications director Tim Murtaugh told Fox News.

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He added: “The doctors have publicly stated many times that the President listens to their advice and that they have not felt political pressure. The Administration took action in January while Democrats were still pursuing their sham impeachment, first with CDC travel alerts and screenings at major U.S. airports, and then with the President’s travel restrictions on China, which saved thousands of American lives.”

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Godfall Gets Its Best PS5 Trailer Yet – Push Square

September 12th, 2020

1,030 Covid cases, 9 deaths reported in Iowa Saturday – KCRG

September 12th, 2020

DES MOINES, Iowa (KCRG) -The Iowa Department of Public Health is reporting 1,030 more COVID-19 cases and nine more deaths in Iowa over the last 24 hours.

Those numbers are as of 6 pm. The state’s data is now showing a total of 73,784 cases and 1,217 deaths.

A total of 7,476 tests were reported to have been conducted over the last 24 hours. That brings the total to 696,703 since the pandemic began. The positivity rate is at 13.8%.

Currently there are 274 patients hospitalized. That’s down 16 compared to yesterday. 79 patients are in ICU, down from 90 yesterday. 36 patients were admitted.

Copyright 2020 KCRG. All rights reserved.

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Trump officials seek greater control over CDC reports on coronavirus – The Washington Post

September 12th, 2020

The emails, first reported late Friday by Politico, describe the CDC documents, widely known as the MMWR, as being “hit pieces on the administration.” Caputo confirmed the authenticity of the emails.

The emails echo the sentiments from an earlier attack by Alexander, reported in The Washington Post in July, about an MMWR on the potential risk of the coronavirus to pregnant women. In that email, Alexander also accused the CDC of undermining the president. The emails are the latest evidence of how the nation’s top public health agency is coming under intense pressure from Trump and his allies, who are playing down the dangers of the pandemic ahead of the Nov. 3 presidential election.

“Most often, the MMWRs are [issued] for purely scientific reasons,” Caputo said Saturday. “But in an election year, and in the time of covid-19, it’s no longer unanimously scientific. There’s political content.”

Caputo said his conclusions are based on reviews by Alexander, an assistant professor at McMaster University in Canada and a specialist in health research methods. Caputo hired him this spring to advise on the science of the pandemic.

Despite the changes to the MMWRs sought by HHS, the requests were “infrequently” accepted by the CDC, Caputo said.

Alexander “gets into productive discussions with the scientists who are open to criticism. They’re free to reject them,” Caputo said. “I think most of his criticisms are rejected.”

He added: “Science is disagreements. It must be difficult for [CDC] to be criticized by an Oxford-educated scientist who has been published in peer-reviewed journals 67 times.”

A former administration official with direct knowledge of the communications from HHS said a request that all reports be stopped until Alexander could review them in their entirety was rejected. On other requests, the CDC “put its head down” and did not comply and “continued to get in trouble over and over again” for doing so, the former official said. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity to share sensitive deliberations.

MMWRs are written by career experts for scientists and public health specialists and are considered among the most authoritative public health reports because they provide evidence-based information on a range of health topics. The reports are independent scientific publications that undergo rigorous vetting, often with multiple drafts to check data and methodology. The reports are closely held; few individuals at the CDC have access until just before publication.

The CDC editorial staff that produces the MMWRs typically sends one-paragraph summaries to HHS and other CDC officials a few days before publication.

“Whenever they come out with that list, there’s concern across [HHS] that some of the scholarship has been tainted by politics,” Caputo said. “That’s my opinion.”

Over the course of the pandemic, top officials including Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus task force response coordinator, and HHS Secretary Alex Azar have wanted to have a “more complete picture” of the CDC’s activity, according to an HHS official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to share internal deliberations. The MMWRs were the main focus, the official said.

“The future of the agency depends on its ability to disseminate science-based data and recommendations that are science-based,” the official said. “Putting a political lens on everything that we say is very concerning,” the official added. The CDC is not going to do that, the official said. There is no intention or attempt to undermine the president in the publication of CDC reports, the official said, referring to accusations by Alexander as “a paranoid assumption that is not based on anything.”

The CDC declined to comment Saturday.

One CDC report that drew particular scrutiny was on hydroxychloroquine. The MMWR urged clinicians to follow long-accepted prescribing guidelines for the malaria drug. Trump favored the drug as a coronavirus treatment despite scant evidence. The CDC was concerned the drug was potentially being misused to treat covid-19, the illness caused by the virus, and affecting supplies of the medication to treat conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.

“Current data on treatment and pre- or postexposure prophylaxis for COVID-19 indicate that the potential benefits of these drugs do not appear to outweigh their risks,” the report said.

The report had been delayed for weeks, according to a former administration official with direct knowledge of the efforts.

In another instance, a report about the spread of the coronavirus at a Georgia sleep-away camp was also delayed, the former official said. That report, issued July 31, suggested that children of all ages are susceptible to coronavirus infection and may spread it to others — a finding likely to intensify an already fraught discussion about the risks of sending children back to school.

“That report gave them a lot of grief,” the former official said. “But you can’t change facts.” The report likely was delayed, the former official said, to avoid being released around the same time Trump was calling for schools to reopen in person. The changes that were sought were not included, the former official said.

The tone of Alexander’s emails is harsh, this person said, because the CDC ignored his requests. In one email, Alexander wrote to CDC Director Robert Redfield asking that the agency modify two already published reports that Alexander said mistakenly inflated the risks of coronavirus to children and undermined Trump’s push to reopen schools.

“CDC to me appears to be writing hit pieces on the administration,” Alexander wrote in an email. “CDC tried to report as if once kids get together, there will be spread and this will impact school reopening. … Very misleading by CDC and shame on them. Their aim is clear.”

The interference by HHS political appointees in the MMWR process has infuriated career scientists, who have been frustrated for months over the inability to allow scientists to fully share and explain information.

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Coronvavirus: Orange County reports 147 new cases and 12 new deaths as of Sept. 12 – OCRegister

September 12th, 2020

The Orange County Health Care Agency reported 147 new cases of the coronavirus as of Saturday, Sept. 12, increasing the cumulative total to 50,760 cases.

There were 12 new deaths reported in Orange County on Saturday, raising the death total to 1,093. The data on deaths in the county is compiled from death certificates or gathered through the course of case investigations and can take weeks to process, officials say.

Of the 1,093 deaths countywide, 413 were skilled nursing facility residents, 75 were in assisted living facilities and one was listed as homeless.

The county’s breakdown of deaths by age is as follows:

  • 85 and older: 31% (356)
  • 75-84: 22% (234)
  • 65-74: 20% (221)
  • 55-64: 13% (156)
  • 45-54: 9% (94)
  • 35-44: 3% (30)
  • 25-34: 1.3% (17)
  • 18-24: <1% (4)
  • 17 and younger: 0% (1)

An estimated 8,589 new cases of the virus have been reported since Aug. 12.

It is estimated that about 89% of the cumulative reported cases, or 45,126 people as of Saturday, have recovered. The count of people who have recovered is based on the prior 28-day cumulative case count.

The county reports a total of 732,422 tests have been given since testing began, and at least 8,558 tests were reported in the last 24 hours. Orange County’s test positivity rate – the share of tests that come back positive – is about 4.2%.

The county reported 215 patients in hospitals, with 65 people in ICUs, with the coronavirus on Saturday.

Data posted each day is preliminary and subject to change, officials emphasize. More information may become available as individual case investigations are completed.

You can find the Orange County Health Care Agency dashboard here.

Hospitalizations and deaths:

Orange County total cases by ZIP code for Sept. 10:

Case demographics as of Aug. 20:

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Astra may make 2nd orbital launch attempt this year after test flight failure – Space.com

September 12th, 2020