Archive

Archive for September 13th, 2020

Flu shots save lives during COVID | Local News | laconiadailysun.com – The Laconia Daily Sun

September 13th, 2020

LACONIA — John Prickett, a registered nurse and emergency preparedness coordinator, has seen plenty of flu seasons in his 39 years at Lakes Region General Hospital. But this year his job is a little more strategic, and his goal is a little more pressing.

“Get a flu vaccine. Protect yourself. 2020 is going to be an odd year,” Prickett said. “This is kind of a new area for all of us.”

At a time when COVID-19 has captured the public’s worst fears, Prickett is a flu ambassador, a role that includes giving flu shots, educating vaccine-wary and needle-phobic consumers, and making sure hospital and clinic staff have the protection they need – especially during the high-risk months from October until May.

This season health care workers and the public will battle viruses on two fronts – trying to ward off COVID-19 and the flu, which typically peaks from December through March. Fever, chills, cough, sore throat, runny nose, fatigue – the symptoms of the two are nearly identical, according to the Centers for Disease Control. And that makes it tough to know exactly what you’re dealing with.

“At this time, anything we can do to avoid any infectious respiratory illness, colds and especially influenza becomes really important,” said Dr. Nora Janeway, medical director of Health First Family Care. Statewide, flu vaccination rates hover at 52 percent, according to CDC data from 2018-2019. Vaccination rates in New Hampshire range from 37 percent of younger adults, to 72 percent of kids under 5 and adults 65 and older – the age groups most vulnerable.

“I am struck by how many of my older patients,” including those who smoke or have diabetes, “say, ‘I don’t usually get sick, so I don’t want a flu shot,’ or ‘I got a flu shot once and got a cold two weeks later,’” Janeway said. “I appreciate all those folks who are rugged individualists and want to manage their own health care. But when it comes to getting a flu shot, I wish I could move the bar a bit.”

The fact that COVID and flu symptoms match closely can make diagnosis confusing for patients and practitioners, and that can delay time-sensitive treatment.

“Do I have COVID? Or do I have the flu? Or do I have both?” said Prickett, a flu ambassador for roughly 20 years, who has given thousands of influenza vaccines. “By getting the vaccine, you take one of these unknowns out.”

The value of flu shots goes beyond personal protection.  In a normal flu season, health care systems are stressed, and decreasing flu hospitalizations will help hospitals respond to potential COVID cases, said Beth Daly, chief of the Bureau of Infectious Disease Control at the NH Department of Health and Human Services. On average, flu vaccines decrease medical visits for flu-related illness by 60 percent, she said.  

This year’s vaccines are predicted to be highly effective, containing three or four non-living strains of Flu A and Flu B, inactive versions of serious and less-serious flu strains which together signal the body to mount antibodies. 

Flu vaccination will help take the stress off local healthcare systems by thwarting a simultaneous spike of COVID and flu during winter, said Tammy Charmichael, executive director of the Partnership for Public Health for the Winnipesaukee region.

Flu shots are especially critical for people with pre-existing conditions such as asthma, diabetes or heart disease, Prickett said. Medical science still knows relatively little about the coronavirus, and although a vaccine is expected before or during the first half of 2021, there are still many unknowns, including how much will be widely available. 

According to the CDC, symptoms of COVID and the flu include fever or feeling feverish, chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle pain or body aches, headaches, and vomiting or diarrhea, which is more common in children than in adults with the flu. More specific to COVID is a change in or loss of taste or smell, and nausea, vomiting or diarrhea in adults.

Short of vaccination, “The easiest way to keep from getting the flu is to wash your hands and don’t touch your face,” Prickett said.  That plus wearing a mask and social distancing will reduce your risk of getting either illness, he said.

But the bottom line is to get vaccinated, experts say. “It’s simple. It’s easy. It’s relatively painless,” said Prickett. “People need to understand that the flu can be pretty deadly with pre-existing conditions and the shot can prevent people from getting so sick.”

New Hampshire is the country’s second oldest state behind Maine, with a significant and growing population over age 65. Even when the vaccine isn’t an exact match “it will still give your body a significant advantage, said Andrea Harper, an infectious disease prevention specialist at LRGH.

One of the most pernicious complications of influenza, according to a recent research, is sudden heart complications.  In a study released last month by the CDC, one in eight patients hospitalized with influenza developed cardiac problems, a third of them ended up in intensive care, and 7 percent of them died.

“You might be OK with the flu,” Harper said, “but not with heart complications on top of it.”

Sunshine

The Sunshine Project is underwritten by grants from the Endowment for Health, New Hampshire’s largest health foundation, and the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation.

The Sunshine Project is underwritten by grants from the Endowment for Health, New Hampshire’s largest health foundation, and the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation. Roberta Baker can be reached by email at Roberta@laconiadailysun.com

Uncategorized

Coronavirus hospitalizations continue to drop in Orange County; no new COVID deaths reported – KABC-TV

September 13th, 2020
ANAHEIM, Calif. (CNS) — Orange County officials on Sunday reported 170 new cases of COVID-19 and no additional deaths, bringing the county’s totals to 50,930 cases with 1,093 fatalities.

Hospitalizations in the county continued to drop, falling from 215 Saturday to 196, while the number of intensive care unit patients dropped from 65 to 58, according to the Orange County Health Care Agency.

The county’s daily case count per 100,000 people stands at 5.2, and the seven-day rate of residents testing positive for the coronavirus is 4.2%

The OCHCA reported that 737,558 COVID-19 tests have been conducted, including 5,136 reported Sunday. There have been 45,197 documented recoveries.

The numbers came as people were returning to movie theaters across the county this weekend. Regal Cinemas re-opened at Irvine Spectrum and AMC opened its larger locations across the county — both with limited capacity to guard against further spread of the virus.

OC moves up on state’s COVID-19 tracking list amid promising case trends

Orange County was upgraded from the purple to the red tier in California’s coronavirus monitoring system last week. The move allowed for churches, theaters and other businesses to resume indoor operations, but with strict limits on capacity and other health measures in place.

Theaters, restaurants and churches are restricted to 25% capacity or 100 people, whichever is less. Museums, zoos and aquariums also may reopen indoor activities at 25% capacity. Shopping centers may expand from 25% capacity to half-capacity under the red tier, while gyms can reopen, but at 10% capacity.

The theater chains are instituting many other safety protocols as well.

Regal guests will be required to wear face masks at all times while in the auditoriums unless eating and drinking. Two empty seats will be maintained between groups, and the chain is “increasing our fresh air intake by 50%-100% above normal levels (which will help circulate more fresh air throughout auditoriums).”

Regal employees will undergo daily health screenings including temperature checks where mandated, will be required to wash their hands every 30 to 60 minutes, and all employees will be required to wear masks.

Guests can purchase concessions with a mobile app while in the theater, but menu offerings have been reduced, and self-service condiment stands are closed.

Regal’s Edwards Aliso Viejo & IMAX theater also opened Saturday.

Meanwhile, AMC had re-opened its Orange County multiplexes as of Saturday, including the Anaheim GardenWalk 6, Dine-In Fullerton 20, Orange 30, and Tustin 14 at The District.

AMC locations have similar capacity restrictions and safety protocols in place for guests and employees.

Copyright © 2020 by City News Service, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Uncategorized

Feds seize almost $400K of ‘counterfeit Apple AirPods’ that are actually OnePlus Buds – The Verge

September 13th, 2020

Coronavirus hospitalizations continue to drop in Orange County; no new COVID deaths reported – KABC-TV

September 13th, 2020
ANAHEIM, Calif. (CNS) — Orange County officials on Sunday reported 170 new cases of COVID-19 and no additional deaths, bringing the county’s totals to 50,930 cases with 1,093 fatalities.

Hospitalizations in the county continued to drop, falling from 215 Saturday to 196, while the number of intensive care unit patients dropped from 65 to 58, according to the Orange County Health Care Agency.

The county’s daily case count per 100,000 people stands at 5.2, and the seven-day rate of residents testing positive for the coronavirus is 4.2%

The OCHCA reported that 737,558 COVID-19 tests have been conducted, including 5,136 reported Sunday. There have been 45,197 documented recoveries.

The numbers came as people were returning to movie theaters across the county this weekend. Regal Cinemas re-opened at Irvine Spectrum and AMC opened its larger locations across the county — both with limited capacity to guard against further spread of the virus.

OC moves up on state’s COVID-19 tracking list amid promising case trends

Orange County was upgraded from the purple to the red tier in California’s coronavirus monitoring system last week. The move allowed for churches, theaters and other businesses to resume indoor operations, but with strict limits on capacity and other health measures in place.

Theaters, restaurants and churches are restricted to 25% capacity or 100 people, whichever is less. Museums, zoos and aquariums also may reopen indoor activities at 25% capacity. Shopping centers may expand from 25% capacity to half-capacity under the red tier, while gyms can reopen, but at 10% capacity.

The theater chains are instituting many other safety protocols as well.

Regal guests will be required to wear face masks at all times while in the auditoriums unless eating and drinking. Two empty seats will be maintained between groups, and the chain is “increasing our fresh air intake by 50%-100% above normal levels (which will help circulate more fresh air throughout auditoriums).”

Regal employees will undergo daily health screenings including temperature checks where mandated, will be required to wash their hands every 30 to 60 minutes, and all employees will be required to wear masks.

Guests can purchase concessions with a mobile app while in the theater, but menu offerings have been reduced, and self-service condiment stands are closed.

Regal’s Edwards Aliso Viejo & IMAX theater also opened Saturday.

Meanwhile, AMC had re-opened its Orange County multiplexes as of Saturday, including the Anaheim GardenWalk 6, Dine-In Fullerton 20, Orange 30, and Tustin 14 at The District.

AMC locations have similar capacity restrictions and safety protocols in place for guests and employees.

Copyright © 2020 by City News Service, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Uncategorized

Dallas County reports 156 coronavirus cases, 3 deaths – The Dallas Morning News

September 13th, 2020

Dallas County reported 156 new coronavirus cases Sunday along with three new deaths.

Twenty-eight of the cases reported Sunday came from the state’s reporting system, including two from April, four from May, nine from July, two from August and 11 from September. The rest, 139, were reported directly to the county health department.

The latest victims are a Dallas man in his 50s who had been living in a long-term care facility, a Dallas woman in her 50s who had been critically ill at a hospital and had underlying health conditions, and a Garland man in his 90s with underlying health conditions who had been living in a long-term health facility.

The newly reported cases bring the county’s total confirmed cases to 75,208. The county’s death toll stands at 973.

The county also has reported 3,593 probable cases and 11 probable COVID-19 deaths. While other North Texas counties provide estimates for how many people have recovered from the virus, Dallas County officials do not report recoveries, saying it’s not a measurement used by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The county reported that between Aug. 30 and Sept. 5, 104 school-age children tested positive for COVID-19, a decline from the previous week. Over the last two weeks, 33 cases have been associated with youth hockey teams in D-FW, including five coaches. A 29-year-old hockey coach in an adjacent county was reported to have COVID-19 at the time of his death, according to the county.

More than two-thirds of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization so far have been in people under 65, and diabetes has been an underlying condition in about one-third of all hospitalized patients, according to the county.

The county’s provisional seven-day average of daily new confirmed and probable cases for the latest reporting period, between Aug. 30 and Sept. 5, was 243. The figure is calculated by the date of the COVID-19 test collection, according to the county.

Of the county’s total confirmed COVID-19 deaths, about 25% are associated with long-term care facilities.

Although those numbers have declined since highs in July, health officials said the virus still has a “disruptive” impact on the county’s health-care systems, according to a news release from the county judge’s office.

Across the state, 1,840 more cases were reported Sunday, along with 47 deaths from the virus. Texas has reported 659,434 confirmed cases and 14,190 fatalities.

The state said it would not update the number of total tests on its dashboard Sunday. Positivity rates would be updated Monday, the state said on the dashboard.

Tarrant County

Tarrant County reported 314 coronavirus cases Sunday and two new deaths.

The latest victims include a Fort Worth man in his 80s and an Arlington man in his 50s. Both had underlying health conditions, the county said.

The newly reported cases bring the county’s total to 44,454, including 2,887 probable cases. The death toll stands at 605, and 39,380 people have recovered.

There are 201 people hospitalized with the virus in Tarrant County, according to Sunday’s numbers on the county’s dashboard.

Collin County

Collin County added 15 coronavirus cases Sunday, bringing its total to 12,001.

The county also reported two new deaths, raising the toll to 124.

According to the county, 11,257 people have recovered from the virus and 70 are hospitalized.

Collin County, which receives its data from the Department of State Health Services since it turned over case management in June, has a note on its dashboard warning residents that it has low confidence in the numbers it is being provided.

Denton County

Denton County hadn’t reported new coronavirus numbers as of 8 p.m. Sunday.

On Saturday, the county announced 37 new coronavirus cases, bringing its total to 11,014. Its death toll stands at 105.

The county has reported 9,385 recoveries from the virus.

Other counties

The Texas Department of State Health Services has taken over reporting for other North Texas counties. Some of those counties may not report updates each day.

The latest numbers are:

  • Rockwall County: 1,446 cases, 24 deaths
  • Kaufman County: 2,915 cases, 44 deaths
  • Ellis County: 3,998 cases, 62 deaths
  • Johnson County: 2,663 cases, 48 deaths

Staff writer LaVendrick Smith contributed to this report.

Having trouble seeing this map? Click here.

Uncategorized

Vaccine hopes boost world share markets – Reuters

September 13th, 2020

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The dollar weakened and world stock markets rallied on Monday on encouraging signs of progress in developing a COVID-19 vaccine, while several multi-billion dollar deals also helped lift the spirit of investors after the downdraft in the past two weeks.

FILE PHOTO: A street sign is seen in front of the New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street in New York, February 10, 2009. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

Gold jumped almost 1% as the dollar slid and bond yields were stable as investors gauge how the U.S. Federal Reserve will put its new approach to monetary policy into practice and keep its dovish stance at this week’s policy meeting.

Pfizer Inc and BioNTech SE on Saturday proposed expanding their Phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine trial to about 44,000 participants, while increasing the diversity of the trial population.

Drugmaker AstraZeneca also said on Saturday it has resumed British clinical trials of its COVID-19 vaccine, one of the most advanced in development, after getting the green light from safety watchdogs.

Enrollment of new patients and other trial procedures for AstraZeneca’s pivotal U.S. trial were being rescheduled until at least midweek and it was not clear how long it would take for a U.S. investigators to complete a probe, sources told Reuters.

“The market reacts positively to any vaccine news,” said Tim Ghriskey, chief investment strategist at Inverness Counsel in New York. “We’re going to see a lot more vaccines come out, and that is what really is helping the markets.”

The World Health Organization reported a record one-day increase in global coronavirus cases on Sunday, with the total rising by 307,930 in 24 hours. The biggest increases were from India, the United States and Brazil.

“There is still some caution in markets because U.S. virus numbers appear to be picking up again in some states,” said Seema Shah, chief strategist at Principal Global Investors.

“The vaccine news is positive but there is a lot of skepticism about when they become widely adopted,” Shah said.

Plans by Nvidia Corp to buy British-based chip designer Arm from Japan’s SoftBank Group Corp for as much as $40 billion, a deal expected to reshape the global semiconductor landscape, also drove sentiment. Nvidia shares, which have more than doubled this year, added 5.8%.

Oracle surged 4.3% as the cloud services company said it would team up with China’s ByteDance to keep TikTok operating in the United States, beating Microsoft Corp in a deal structured as a partnership rather than an outright sale.

Slideshow ( 2 images )

MSCI’s benchmark for global equity markets rose 1.17% to 572.57. In Europe, the broad FTSEurofirst 300 index edged up 0.07% to 1,429 as losses in the energy sector offset surging travel and technology stocks that were boosted by the vaccine news.

On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 1.18%, the S&P 500 gained 1.27% and the Nasdaq Composite added 1.87% after plunging 10% into corrective territory on Friday from a record closing high on Sept. 2.

U.S. stocks had notched two straight weeks of losses as investors sold the technology shares that fueled the benchmark S&P 500 and Nasdaq to record highs in a dramatic recovery from March lows spawned by the pandemic-induced downturn.

Overnight in Asia, MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan rose 0.9% to its highest in almost a week. Japan’s Nikkei firmed 0.7% after Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga won a landslide victory in a ruling party leadership election, paving the way for him to succeed Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

The Fed starts a two-day policy meeting on Tuesday, the first since unveiling a landmark shift to a more tolerant stance on inflation in August. The Bank of Japan and the Bank of England announce their respective policy decisions on Thursday.

Sterling, which has been hurt by renewed Brexit turmoil, firmed before a vote on British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s plan to break international law by breaching parts of the Brexit divorce treaty with the European Union.

Sterling was last trading at $1.2855, up 0.48% on the day, while the dollar index fell 0.22%.

The euro was up 0.15% to $1.1863, and the Japanese yen strengthened 0.48% versus the greenback at 105.70 per dollar.

Turkey’s lira set a record low against the U.S. dollar and its dollar bonds came under pressure after Moody’s cut the country’s sovereign rating and warned of the risk of a balance of payment crisis.

The 10-year U.S. Treasury note rose 0.7 basis points to 0.6739%.

Oil prices slipped slightly on concerns about a stalled global economic recovery as Libya is poised to resume production, and failed to get support from an impending storm that has disrupted U.S. oil output.

Brent crude futures settled down 22 cents at $39.61 a barrel. U.S. crude futures fell 7 cents to settle at $37.26 a barrel.

U.S. gold futures settled up 0.8% at $1,963.70 an ounce.

Reporting by Herb Lash; additional reproting by Dhara Ranasinghe; Editing by Dan Grebler, Nick Zieminski and Will Dunham

Uncategorized

Samsung will stream a ‘Galaxy Unpacked for Every Fan’ on September 23rd – Engadget

September 13th, 2020

L.A. County coronavirus numbers fall back to pre-surge levels – Los Angeles Times

September 13th, 2020

The L.A. County Department of Public Health reported 11 new coronavirus deaths Sunday, as daily hospitalizations continued to decline over the weekend.

About 800 people were hospitalized with the virus countywide, 35% of them in an ICU, marking a significant decline from just a few weeks earlier. The new numbers are similar to April, before the summer surge. Hospitalization is an important metric for charting the course of the pandemic, because it captures how many people are seriously ill with the virus, health officials wrote in a statement.

To date, 6,208 Angelenos have died from COVID-19, and more than 18,000 have been hospitalized since the spring. Of those whose deaths were reported Sunday, four were over 80, four were 65 to 79, and two others were 50 to 64 and 30 to 49, respectively. COVID fatalities have clustered among the elderly, though many younger people, including some children, have died from the disease.

Advertisement

The virus remains widespread across L.A. County, although the percent of positive tests has declined steadily, to about 3% this week.

“I send my deepest condolences to the families and friends who are grieving the loss of a loved one due to COVID-19,” said Barbara Ferrer, director of public health. “We will get to a place where we are reopening more business sectors and schools, but in order to do so we still need everyone to do their part to minimize spreading COVID-19 to other people. Each of us has an opportunity and responsibility to save lives and to protect our vulnerable residents who are likely to have severe consequences if infected with COVID-19.”

Uncategorized

Utah doctors: Pandemic makes getting regular flu shot even more important – KSL.com

September 13th, 2020

OGDEN, Utah (AP) — As if COVID-19 weren’t enough to worry about, flu season is gearing up, giving those already jittery about every cough and sneeze more to fret over.

Is the sore throat due to the flu or COVID-19? What about those aches and pains?

Accordingly, Utah health officials are urging the public, now more than ever, to get vaccinated against the flu.

“It is more important than ever to get your flu shot this season! This year we will be facing a bigger challenge than ever — seasonal influenza that is still not fully preventable confounded by the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Filip Roos, chief medical officer for Ogden Regional Medical Center.

The added urgency stems in part from the symptoms the ailments share and concerns about confusing them.

“Many of the symptoms of influenza and COVID-19 are similar, and it can be difficult to figure out which infection a person has,” said Tamara Sheffield, medical director of community health and prevention for Intermountain Healthcare. “Symptoms that the two infections share are a dry cough, fever and chills, fatigue, achiness. People with COVID-19 sometimes have shortness of breath or difficulty breathing and sometimes have a loss of taste or smell, while people with influenza rarely have those symptoms. Headaches are more common in influenza than in COVID-19. Both occasionally show symptoms of sore throat, runny or stuffy nose or diarrhea.”

What’s more, Roos said, vaccinating will keep instances of flu down, tempering the number of hospitalizations required for the ailment, thereby reserving medical resources to deal with COVID-19 cases.

Sheffield said the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is calling for a dramatic increase nationwide in flu vaccinations. Intermountain Healthcare facilities, accordingly, are bracing and preparing. McKay-Dee Hospital in Ogden is an Intermountain Healthcare facility.

“We have been asked to vaccinate hundreds of thousands more people in Utah against influenza than we usually do,” Sheffield said. To do so, “Intermountain Healthcare clinics and pharmacies have ordered extra vaccine and are creating extended hours, flu vaccine clinics and drive-up events to provide as much flu vaccine as possible to our communities.”

Already, signs are popping up outside pharmacies offering flu shots. The public may call the Weber-Morgan Health Department at 801-399-7252 to make an appointment to get a shot, with a drive-through clinic scheduled for Oct. 1, according to Lori Buttars, the department spokesperson.

But surveillance for the flu begins in earnest in early October, with the seasonal case count typically peaking in January or February, though it can come earlier or later, said Trevor Warner, spokesman for the Davis County Health Department. “The important message we want people to understand is that they need to get a flu shot, and then get a COVID-19 shot whenever it becomes available!” Warner said in an email.

Roos said Utah Department of Health guidelines call for those with COVID-19 and flu-like symptoms to test for COVID-19 as a precaution. At the same time, Warner noted that it can be hard to differentiate between the ailments without a test.

“Again, if you are sick stay home. Treat any flu-like symptoms like they are COVID-19 and make sure to follow all precautions outlined by the Department of Health. This includes self-isolation for up to 14 days,” Roos said.

Sheffield said the CDC will soon be offering more detailed guidance on contending with influenza amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The CDC already has a slew of information online differentiating between influenza and COVID-19 at cdc.gov/flu/symptoms/flu-vs-covid19.htm.

Health experts continue to recommend social distancing, frequent hand washing and use of face coverings to guard against COVID-19.

The COVID-19 case count for Weber and Morgan counties totaled 176 for the week ending last Saturday, down from 206 the week before, according to Weber-Morgan Health Department data. Since early August, the weekly case count has hovered between 150 and 206, a far cry from the peak of 413 for the week ending July 18.

Similarly, the weekly case count in Davis County has settled at a lower level than the peak of 438 for the week ending July 18. From 200 cases for the week ending Aug. 15, the weekly total has increased to 269 for the week ending last Saturday.

Tim Vandenack

The Standard-Examiner Via Associated Press

More stories you may be interested in

Uncategorized

Deceased son of victims identified as suspect in fatal Weston Village stabbing incident – 680 News

September 13th, 2020

Police have identified the victims of a stabbing in Weston Village on Saturday as the parents of a suspect, who also died the same day.

Police were called to an address on King George Road around 2:30 p.m. Saturday for multiple reports of a stabbing.

When officers arrived, they found a man suffering from multiple stab wounds outside a home on the street. A woman was found inside the home, also suffering from multiple stab wounds.

The victims were married to each other and were pronounced dead at the scene by paramedics.

They have been identified as Joao Barcelos, 64, and Iva Barcelos, 59.

Investigators were then directed to the GO train tracks near the Weston UP Express station just a short distance away, where a man was struck by a train.

The man was found dead with “significant injuries” and has been identified as Tiberio Barcelos, 28, the son of the stabbing victims.

Police say he did not live with his parents but is believed to be a suspect in their murders.

Anyone with information of Tiberio Barcelos; whereabouts before the stabbings is asked to contact police.

Post mortems for the victims and the suspect are scheduled for Monday.

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations