Archive

Archive for the ‘tablet’ Category

‘This is a warning’: Dix pledges crackdown on parties amid surging coronavirus numbers – Global News

August 13th, 2020

B.C.’s health minister warned of a crackdown this weekend on people flouting coronavirus restrictions at large social gatherings.

Adrian Dix made the comments Thursday, as the province unveiled unsettling new modelling showing the province heading towards a surge of new cases, sparked in part by younger adults attending private parties.

“What I am saying to people this weekend, particularly with respect to the unequivocal provincial health order on gatherings and the limit of 50 people, is that they can expect to be visited (by public health officers) in what are essentially private parties in public halls,” said Dix.

Read more: Why one expert says B.C. fumbled its coronavirus message to young people

“The rules will be enforced, and that can have consequences in the future.”

Story continues below advertisement

Under B.C.’s Public Health Act, people caught breaking one of provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry’s health orders could face a fine of up to $25,000 and a jail term of up to six months.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

“What this is is warning in advance, this weekend, on what’s going to happen, and our expectation that the rules will be followed in those places,” said Dix.

However, while Dix said environmental health officers would be on patrol at banquet halls and similar businesses, he acknowledged there were limits to provincial enforcement when it comes to parties at private residences.

2:06Large social gatherings causing concern for health officials in BC

Large social gatherings causing concern for health officials in BC

“We have, of course, in our law and in our society a respect for people’s rights within their property. But I have to say this: if you’re thinking of organizing a party, especially one involving alcohol, where there’s no specific limit on distancing that you’re putting in place, you should not do so,” he said.

Story continues below advertisement

Dix suggested anyone invited to such a party should not attend, quipping that they may want to “consider the friendship” of the person who invited them.

But while there have been several recent exposure events at Vancouver nightclubs, Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry both said there were no plans in the works to shut such businesses down.

Dix said most bars and restaurants in the province have been following the rules and doing a good job.

Read more: Coronavirus exposure reported on 2 nights at Vancouver nightclub

Henry argued that health officials’ approach of working with industry, tightening regulations where needed and closing problem establishments is working.

“We have found places where their (COVID safety) plans are inadequate and those places are shut down until such time as appropriate plans are in place,” said Henry.

“We’re not at a point where we’re seeing that we feel that we need to shut the entire industry down.”

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations

Coronavirus update: BC modelling suggests what’s to come, and that young people are increasingly impacted – CTV News Vancouver

August 13th, 2020

VANCOUVER — Once a national role model in the fight against COVID-19, British Columbia now faces the very real possibility of an alarming and sustained surge in cases.

New modelling released by public health officials on Thursday suggests the province’s daily case increases could soon surpass the numbers seen at the height of the crisis back in March and April.

The current trajectory indicates that could happen by September, though provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry stressed there’s still time to turn the tide if people improve their behaviour.

“That is concerning but it’s not a predictive model – it doesn’t tell us what’s going to happen, it tells us what can happen,” she said of the modelling projections. “Right now, we have it within our capability to make the changes that we need to bend that curve back down.”

Modelling

The modelling also warns that B.C.’s COVID-19 reproductive number, which tracks how many additional infections are generated per new case, is also “above the threshold for epidemic control.”

The threshold for sustained growth in cases is one – a single additional infection for every case that’s identified – but Henry noted B.C. has been “bouncing around a little bit above one” since June.

Modelling

The daily case numbers have already taken a sharp increase this week, with B.C. adding 85 cases on Wednesday and 78 on Thursday. B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix urged people not to be discouraged, and even more importantly, to do their absolute best to diligently follow the advice officials have been hammering for weeks.

“Don’t give up. Do not lose faith, do not lose hope,” Dix said. “Your participation and your leadership have never been more important. We have responsibilities in public health but it is you who are making all the difference. We’re counting on you.”

Much of the recent growth in cases has been blamed on young people partying and socializing in large numbers, or failing to maintain a proper two-metre distance from one another.

The latest modelling puts that into clearer focus, revealing that demographics of young adults are now overrepresented in B.C.’s infection tally.

Modelling

While people in their 20s make up 13 per cent of the province’s population, they make up 17 per cent of all cases identified since the start of the pandemic. Likewise, people in their 30s make up 14 per cent of the population but account for 18 per cent of cases.

“What we’ve seen is a decrease in the median age of people affected,” Henry said.

Fortunately, officials said, the vast majority of cases still have a known origin – a credit to the crucial contact-tracing work done by public health teams. That work will soon be bolstered by the hiring of 500 new health professionals, Premier John Horgan announced this week.

Despite the concerning outlook, Henry once again reminded the public of her motto – to be calm, kind and safe – and defended the province’s approach as largely successful.

“What we have been doing has worked, and that’s why we are where we are,” she said. “It’s a very small proportion of the population that are doing things that are causing some of the spread that we’re seeing. The vast majority of us are weathering this together and that’s what we need to continue to do.”

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations

Ontario education minister ‘unlocks’ $500M to improve distancing, ventilation for back-to-school – CBC.ca

August 13th, 2020

Ontario Education Minister Stephen Lecce says he’s “unlocked” $500 million in funding to enhance physical distancing and improve air quality as multiple teachers’ unions claim the province’s current plan violates provincial health and safety law.

The minister also announced an additional $50 million for upgrades to ventilation systems and $18 million for online learning amid concerns over student safety during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The half a billion dollars in funding comes after the ministry allowed school boards to dip into reserve funds. Boards that do not have reserves will be provided with funding from an $11 million allocation.

Allowing boards to use the reserve funds is in addition to $309 million provided by the province, which includes $60 million for personal protective equipment in schools and $100 million for custodians and enhanced cleaning products for schools, which was announced in July.

On Thursday, Lecce also said the province is confident that children can return to schools safely in the fall, even amid the pandemic.

“Let me be perfectly clear. If the best medical minds in the province did not think it was safe for your child to go back to school, the choice would have been simple,” he said. “We’re in a position where we are able to safely and confidently reopen schools, but with strict health and safety protocols”

But Lecce’s opening up of new funding follows weeks of criticism of the province’s back-to-school plan from parents, teachers and medical professionals, particularly when it comes to class sizes.

The announcement also comes on the heels of Ontario’s four major education unions alleging that the current back-to-school strategy breaks provincial law by violating occupational health and safety legislation.

With schools opening in about a month, questions are starting to pile up. Pediatrician and the founder and director of Kidcrew Pediatrics, Dr. Dina Kulik, answers questions about testing, the role of grandparents, and whether kids should change their clothes at school before coming home. 12:44

The unions, which represent more than 190,000 teachers and education workers, issued a press release Thursday afternoon saying the plan “fails to meet legal health and safety requirements,” and that teachers and students are not protected against COVID-19. 

They raised red flags over the lack of mask requirements for children under 10, larger class sizes, poor ventilation in schools and lack of adequate screenings and safeguards for students. They’ve asked to meet with Minister of Labour Monte McNaughton and representatives from the Ministry of Education to discuss their concerns.

During the press conference, Lecce didn’t answer questions on whether he’d meet with union representatives, saying that there had been many meetings ahead of Thursday’s announcement.

No class size cap for elementary, air quality questioned in older schools

The issue of class sizes has been the crux of the opposition toward the province’s plan, as while high schools will have a cap of 15 students per class, elementary schools will not have a limit on class sizes for Grades 4 to 8.

Instead, the only stipulation is a maximum average of 24.5 students per class across each school board.

WATCH | Provinces adjust back-to-school plans:

As B.C. delays the start of classes and Ontario parents protest class sizes, the provinces could look to other countries for how to approach going back to school during the COVID-19 pandemic. 2:01

This would mean it’s likely a child could be in a class with 30 or more other students. 

While class caps will still not be placed at the elementary level, Lecce said Thursday that the reserve funding could be used to create alternative classrooms outside of schools if there are difficulties acquiring more space. It gives the opportunity for schools to use the money as they see fit, based on current concerns and needs, he said.

In a report examining back-to-school planning published in July by SickKids hospital, it’s recommended that smaller class sizes be a “priority strategy.”

However, the report said, there is “limited evidence” on what to base the maximum class size numbers on as it depends on other factors, such as the size of the classrooms and if non-traditional spaces, like outdoor classrooms, are being used.

Teachers and parent groups held a protest at Queen’s Park on Wednesday to address the class-size issue, as well as draw attention to the sometimes poor ventilation in older Toronto schools that could exacerbate the crowding concerns.

Parent groups and education workers are protesting outside of Queen’s Park yesterday with a mock classroom to demonstrate the need for smaller class sizes in order to make physical distancing possible. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

At that protest, teachers spoke about how the two-metre physical distancing rules would be impossible for many classrooms based on their size.They also raised concerns about building repairs that are needed to increase airflow in many schools.

Parents and teacher coalitions at Wednesday’s protest asked the province for $3 billion in funding to allow for smaller class sizes and updated ventilation systems.

Older schools can use individual HVAC mobile units with the funding to support current ventilation instead of entirely remodeling a school’s airflow system, Lecce noted at the press conference.

As schools are three weeks away from opening, Lecce was asked if there is enough time for boards to determine how to properly use the money that’s become available and implement changes before the first day.

In response, he said schools have already been preparing and these changes can be “layered” on top of what is already in the works in order to “de-risk the circumstance.”

Using reserve funds would create ‘future financial risks’: TDSB

The Toronto District School Board provided CBC News with a memo to school trustees from Interim Director Carlene Jackson that says pulling from reserve funds would be a liability and lead to “future financial risks” for the board.

“It would not be prudent or good financial management if we were to use a large amount of reserve funds to cover the entire cost of smaller class sizes,” Jackson states. 

School boards and parents are feeling stressed about how COVID-19 safety will be balanced with academic priorities for Ontario high school students who will split their time between the classroom and online learning. 2:03

Staff are instead looking at whether the reserves could be used to augment the TDSB’s share of $30 million for staffing coming from the province, so that they can create class sizes of 15 to 20, she said. The board will be applying for this funding as soon as it’s available.

Even if class sizes are smaller, the schools do not currently have enough space to accommodate these sizes and staff are working on finding more options for new classrooms, explained Jackson. Transportation would need to be arranged if new school locations are added.

The TDSB is also looking into how to use its portion of the $50 million in HVAC upgrades with the school year just weeks away.

“Given this significant change, staff would have to assess if the necessary arrangements could be made in time for the first day of school on Sept. 8,” she said. 

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations

UAE, Israel normalise ties: All the latest updates – Al Jazeera English

August 13th, 2020
  • Israel and the United Arab Emirates have reached a historic deal that will lead to a full normalisation of diplomatic relations between the two Middle Eastern nations.
  • The deal came after a phone call between US President Donald Trump, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Sheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed, crown prince of Abu Dhabi.
  • The White House says the agreement will see Israel suspend its plans to annex Palestinian areas of the occupied West Bank.

Here are the latest updates:

20:02 GMT – Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas ‘rejects and denounces’ UAE-Israel deal 

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas denounced Israel’s accord with the United Arab Emirates in a statement issued by his spokesman.

“The Palestinian leadership rejects and denounces the UAE, Israeli and US trilateral, surprising, announcement,” said Nabil Abu Rudeineh, a senior adviser to Abbas.

Abu Rudeineh, reading from a statement outside Abbas’ headquarters in Ramallah in the occupied West Bank, said the deal was a “betrayal of Jerusalem, Al-Aqsa and the Palestinian cause.”

The statement urged the Arab League and the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation to assemble to “reject” the deal, adding “neither the UAE nor any other party has the right to speak in the name of the Palestinian people.”

20:00 GMT – Kushner: Israel deal on annexation will take a while to take effect. 

White House adviser Jared Kushner has said that a deal would take time to be implemented, when asked how long Israel had agreed to suspend its West Bank annexation plans as part of its normalisation deal with the UAE.

19:30 GMT – Israel-UAE deal will not stop Netanyahu’s annexation plans: Analyst 

Mustafa Barghouti, secretary general and co-founder of the Ramallah-based Palestinian National Initiative, said the deal between Israel and the UAE will not stop Netanyahu’s annexation plans. 

“The Israelis and Emirates had relations already, there was never a struggle between them so I don’t know why they need to call it a peace agreement,” Barghouti told Al Jazeera. 

“The reality is that the problem is with the Palestinian people, with the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian land, the problem is with the Israeli plan of annexation of Palestinian land which Netanyahu has confirmed one more time today that he is proceeding with.”

“The problem is with the system of racism and apartheid that Israel excises against the Palestinian people.”

19:25 GMT – Iran official says UAE-Israel deal will not secure regional peace 

The agreement between Israel and the United Arab Emirates will not secure peace in the region, tweeted a special adviser on international affairs to the speaker of Iran’s parliament. 

“UAE’s new approach for normalizing ties w/fake, criminal #Israel doesn’t maintain peace & security, but serves ongoing Zionists’ crimes,” tweeted Hossein Amir-Abdollahian, also a former deputy foreign minister.

“Abu Dhabi’s behavior has no justification, turning back on the Palestine cause. W/ that strategic mistake, #UAE will be engulfed in Zionism fire.”

19:15 GMT – ‘Nothing historic’ about Israel-UAE agreement 

Omar Baddar, a US-based analyst, said there was “nothing historic” or “groundbreaking” about Thursday’s deal between the UAE and Israel. 

“Israel didn’t ‘halt’ the annexation for the West Bank (annexation is ALREADY a de facto reality on the ground). Israel merely ‘suspended’ its announcement of a reality it has already illegally imposed on Palestinians. It is FALSE to say Israel suspended it at the UAE’s request,” Baddar wrote on Twitter. 

19:05 GMT – How the world reacted to the UAE-Israel normalising diplomatic ties 

The United Arab Emirates has become the first Gulf Arab country to reach a deal on normalising relations with Israel, capping years of discreet contacts between the two countries in commerce and technology.

The so-called “Abraham Agreement”, announced by US President Donald Trump on Thursday, secures an Israeli commitment to halt further annexation of Palestinian lands in the occupied West Bank.

However, addressing reporters later in Tel Aviv, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said he agreed to “delay” the annexation as part of the deal with the UAE, but the plans remain “on the table”.

Read more here

18:55 GMT – Brahrain says UAE-Israel deal strengthens chances of peace 

Bahrain has welcomed the accord between the UAE and Israel, saying the “historic diplomatic breakthrough will advance peace in the Middle East region”.

The small island state also praised the US for its efforts towards securing the deal. 

Hamas: Israel-UAE deal a ‘stab in back of Palestinians’ (13:21)

18:05 GMT – US presidential candidate Biden says Israel-UAE deal ‘brave and badly needed’

US Democratic Presidential candidate Joe Biden hailed the Israel-UAE deal as an historic step toward a more stable Middle East, warning he would not support Israel’s annexation of Jewish settlements if he wins the White House in November.

“The UAE’s offer to publicly recognize the State of Israel is a welcome, brave, and badly-needed act of statesmanship,” the former Vice President said in a statement. “Annexation would be a body blow to the cause of peace, which is why I oppose it now and would oppose it as president.”

17:50 GMT – Netanyahu: UAE deal start of a ‘new era’ for Israel and Arab world   

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has hailed the US-brokered deal to normalise ties between Israel and the United Arab Emirates, saying the agreement signaled the beginning of a new era with the Arab world. 

“Today a new era began in the relations between Israel and the Arab world,” he said at a televised press conference.

Netanyahu said the “full and official peace” with the UAE would lead to cooperation in many spheres between the countries and a “wonderful future” for citizens of both countries.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announces a peace agreement to establish diplomatic ties, between Israel and the United Arab Emirates

Netanyahu said the deal would lead to a ‘wonderful future’ for citizens of both countries [Abir Sultan /Pool via Reuters]

17:45 GMT – UK’s Johnson welcomes Israel-UAE normalisation deal 

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has welcomed the agreement between Israel and the UAE that will lead to a full normalisation of diplomatic relations between the two states.

“The UAE and Israel’s decision to normalise relations is hugely good news,” Johnson said on Twitter.

“It was my profound hope that annexation did not go ahead in the West Bank and today’s agreement to suspend those plans is a welcome step on the road to a more peaceful Middle East.” 

17:10 GMT – Israel’s president invites UAE Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed to visit Jerusalem

President Reuven Rivlin has extended an invitation to UAE Crown Price Mohammed bin Zayed to visit Jerusalem, hours after the announcement that the two countries were establishing full diplomatic ties.

“I invite the crown prince to visit Jerusalem,” he wrote on Twitter, adding a greeting in Arabic.

Rivlin, whose post is ceremonial, said the agreement was “an important and strategic milestone” that could jumpstart agreements with other countries in the region.

Reuven Rivlin

Rivlin, whose role is largely ceremonial, hailed the agreement as ‘an important and strategic milestone’ [File: Mick Tsikas/AFP]

16:55 GMT – UN chief welcomes ‘any initiative’ on Middle East peace, security: Spokesman 

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres welcomes “any initiative that can promote peace and security in the Middle East region,” a UN spokesman said after Israel and the United Arab Emirates announced a deal on bilateral ties.

16:30 GMT – Hamas: Israel-UAE agreement is ‘a reward for the Israeli occupation’s crimes’

Hamas has accused the United Arab Emirates of stabbing Palestinians in the back by agreeing to establish full diplomatic ties with Israel.

“This announcement is a reward for the Israeli occupation’s crimes,” said Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoum. “The normalisation is a stabbing in the back of our people.”

Israel and UAE agree to normalise diplomatic relations (7:17)

16:15 GMT – Israeli legislators welcome normalisation deal with UAE 

Israeli lawmakers have welcoming the establishment of full diplomatic relations with the UAE, with Israeli Defense Minister Benny Gantz – who is also Israel’s “alternate” prime minister under a power sharing deal – saying the agreement expressed an “alliance” between countries in the region who aim for stability and prosperity.

He said the deal will have “many positive implications” on the region and called on other Arab states to pursue peace deals with Israel. He also thanked President Trump, calling him a “true friend of Israel.”

Israeli Foreign Minister Gabi Ashkenazi, part of Gantz’ Blue and White party, said he welcomed Israel’s backing down from “unilateral annexation” of the West Bank, saying Trump’s Middle East plan would be discussed in consultation with countries in the region.

Opposition leader Yair Lapid said “negotiations and agreements, not unilateral steps like annexation” were key to Israel’s diplomatic relations.

16:12 GMT – UAE says deal was done to manage annexation threat 

The United Arab Emirates has said its agreement with Israel was done to deal with the threat that further annexation of Palestinian territories posed to the two-state solution.

The UAE’s minister of state for foreign affairs, Anwar Gargash, urged the Palestinians and Israelis to return to the negotiating table. 

16:10 GMT – Egypt’s Sisi welcomes UAE-Israel deal, halt to annexation 

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi has welcomed the normalisation of ties between the United Arab Emirates and Israel, saying he valued efforts that will “achieve prosperity and stability for the region”.

“I followed with interest and appreciation the joint statement between the United States, United Arab Emirates and Israel to halt the Israeli annexation of Palestinian lands and taking steps to bring peace in the Middle East,” Sisi said on Twitter.

“I value the efforts of those in charge of the deal to achieve prosperity and stability for our region.” 

16:05 GMT – UAE, Israel to sign bilateral deals on areas including tourism, direct flights

Delegations from the United Arab Emirates and Israel will meet during the coming weeks to sign bilateral agreements on areas including energy, tourism, direct flights, investment, security, communication and technology, the UAE foreign ministry said.

15:50 GMT – UAE-Israel deal is a ‘win’ for diplomacy, the region – UAE embassy to US

The United Arab Emirates embassy to the United States said an agreement to fully normalise relations between Israel and the UAE was a win for diplomacy and for the region that lowers tensions.

Ambassador Youssef Al Otaiba said the agreement maintained the viability of a two state solution and the UAE remained a strong supporter of the Palestinian people, in a statement on Twitter. 

Benjamin Netanyahu and Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed

Youssef Al Otaiba, the UAE’s ambassador to the United States said his country remained a strong supporter of the Palestinian people [Reuters]

15:48 GMT – UAE official says Israeli annexation would have ended peace hopes

UAE minister of state for foreign affairs Anwar Gargash said on Thursday any further Israeli annexation of Palestinian territory would have ended hopes for peace in the region.

In an interview with Sky News Arabia after the announcement that the UAE had agreed to a deal to normalise relations with Israel, Gargash said the UAE had dismantled a ticking time bomb that was threatening the two state solution.  

15:45 GMT – Palestinian official accuses UAE of ‘normalisation’ with Israel

Senior Palestinian official Hanan Ashrawi accused The United Arab Emirates of “normalisation” with Israel after Thursday’s announcement of a historic peace deal.

Ashrawi, a veteran Palestinian negotiator and member of the executive committee of the Palestine Liberation Organization, said on Twitter: “The UAE has come out in the open on its secret dealings/normalization with Israel. Please don’t do us a favor. We are nobody’s fig leaf!”  

Does Trump support Israel’s annexation move? (1:57)

15:40 GMT – Pompeo says Israel-UAE agreement is enormous step forward

An agreement on normalising relations reached between Israel and the United Arab Emirates on Thursday is an “enormous” step forward on the “right path”, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told reporters with him on a trip to central European countries.

Pompeo made his remarks shortly before taking off from Slovenia for Austria’s capital Vienna.

The agreement, which US President Donald Trump helped broker, will lead to the full normalisation of diplomatic relations between the two Middle Eastern nations. 

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks with the Emirati Ambassador to the US Yousef Al Otaiba at the NYU Abu Dhabi campus in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates January 13, 2019. Andrew Caballero-Reyno

The agreement will lead to the full normalisation of diplomatic relations between the two Middle Eastern nations [File: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool via Reuters]

15:40 GMT – Israel hails ‘great day for peace’ after deal with UAE announced

Israel hailed a US-brokered peace deal with the United Arab Emirates as a “great day for peace” and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was due to hold a news conference at 1600 GMT to comment further.

Saying he had to deal with a matter of great national interest, Netanyahu abruptly left a cabinet discussion on the coronavirus crisis about an hour before US President Donald Trump announced the agreement to normalise relations between Israel and the Gulf Arab country.

On Twitter, Ron Dermer, Israel’s ambassador in Washington, wrote: “A great day for peace! Israel commends the courage of MBZ (de facto UAE leader Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan) for the historic decision of the UAE to join Egypt (1979) and Jordan (1994) in making peace with Israel. Israel deeply appreciates all … Trump has done to make this breakthrough possible.”

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations

Israel, United Arab Emirates reach historic deal to normalize diplomatic relations – CBC.ca

August 13th, 2020

Israel and the United Arab Emirates reached a historic peace deal on Thursday that will lead to a full normalization of diplomatic relations between the two Middle Eastern nations in an agreement that U.S. President Donald Trump helped broker.

Under the agreement, Israel has agreed to suspend applying sovereignty to areas of the West Bank that it has been discussing annexing, senior White House officials told Reuters.

UAE Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Anwar Gargash said on Thursday any further Israeli annexation of Palestinian territory would have ended hopes for peace in the region.

In an interview with Sky News Arabia after the announcement that the UAE had agreed to a deal to normalize relations with Israel, Gargash said the UAE had dismantled a ticking time bomb that was threatening the two-state solution.

U.S. President Donald Trump helped broker the peace deal between the two Middle East countries. (Evan Vucci/The Associated Press)

The peace deal was the product of lengthy discussions between Israel, the UAE and the U.S. that recently accelerated, White House officials said.

The agreement was sealed in a phone call on Thursday between Trump, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Sheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed, crown prince of Abu Dhabi.

The officials described the agreement, to be known as the Abraham Accords, as the first of its kind since Israel and Jordan signed a peace treaty in 1994. It also gives Trump a foreign policy success as he seeks re-election on Nov. 3.

White House officials said Trump senior adviser Jared Kushner, U.S. ambassador to Israel David Friedman and Middle East envoy Avi Berkowitz were deeply involved in negotiating the deal, as well as secretary of state Mike Pompeo and White House national security adviser Robert O’Brien.

A joint statement issued by the three nations said the three leaders had “agreed to the full normalization of relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates.”

“This historic diplomatic breakthrough will advance peace in the Middle East region and is a testament to the bold diplomacy and vision of the three leaders and the courage of the United Arab Emirates and Israel to chart a new path that will unlock the great potential in the region,” the statement said.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told reporters on Thursday that the agreement is an “enormous” step forward on the “right path.” 

“This is an enormous, historic step forward,” Pompeo said, adding that it was a historic opportunity for the Middle East to be stable and peaceful. “Peace is the right path forward.”

Delegations from Israel and the United Arab Emirates will meet in the coming weeks to sign bilateral agreements regarding investment, tourism, direct flights, security, telecommunications and other issues, the statement said.

The two countries are expected soon to exchange ambassadors and embassies.

The statement said that as “a result of this diplomatic breakthrough and at the request of President Trump with the support of the United Arab Emirates, Israel will suspend declaring sovereignty” over areas of the West Bank that were envisioned in the U.S. peace plan unveiled by Trump in January.

The Israeli settlement of Maale Adumim, Israel’s largest in the occupied West Bank, with a view the Jerusalem skyline in the background. Under the agreement, Israel has agreed to suspend applying sovereignty to areas of the West Bank that it has been discussing annexing. (Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images)

“Israel for the foreseeable future will be focused on building this relationship and pursuing all the advantages that can come from having this new relationship with this country, and we also break the ice for doing more normalizations and peace agreements with other regional players as well,” one White House official told Reuters.

The agreement envisions giving Muslims greater access to the Al-Aqsa Mosque in the Old City of Jerusalem by allowing them to fly from Abu Dhabi to Tel Aviv, White House officials said.

The joint statement said the United Arab Emirates and Israel will immediately expand and accelerate co-operation regarding the treatment of and the development of a vaccine for the novel coronavirus amid the pandemic.

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations

Biden introduces Harris as ‘smart’ and ‘tough’ in their 1st appearance together as Democratic running mates – CBC.ca

August 12th, 2020

Presumptive Democratic nominees Joe Biden and Kamala Harris delivered an aggressive one-two attack on the character and performance of U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday, as they made their election case for the first time as running mates.

Biden, a 77-year-old white man, embraced the significance of naming the first woman of colour to a major party’s presidential ticket, but he focused on other attributes Harris brings to the ticket.

He hailed the California senator, a 55-year-old former prosecutor who a year ago excoriated Biden on a primary debate stage, as the right woman to help him defeat Trump and then lead a nation facing crises in triplicate: a pandemic, wounded economy and long-simmering reckoning with systemic racism.

Harris, Biden said at a high school gymnasium in his hometown of Wilmington, Del., is “smart. She’s tough. She’s experienced. She’s a proven fighter for the backbone of this country.”

“Kamala knows how to govern. She knows how to make the hard calls. She’s ready to do this job on Day 1.”

WATCH | Biden had a key question for Harris: 

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden explains a key question he asked Kamala Harris before choosing her as his running mate. 0:18

Harris, the daughter of immigrants from India and Jamaica, sat a few metres away from Biden, listening with her mask off.

“This morning, all across the nation, little girls woke up — especially little Black and brown girls who so often feel overlooked and undervalued in their communities. But today, today, just maybe, they’re seeing themselves for the first time in a new way,” Biden said.

WATCH | What Harris brings to the Democratic ticket: 

Harris ‘speaks to the diversity of America’ as a Black woman, a child of immigrants and a visionary, says the African American studies professor. 5:15

Reflecting the coronavirus pandemic, both candidates came onstage wearing protective masks in the high school gym with relatively few in attendance, not in a hall filled with cheering supporters as would normally be the case. Both spoke without masks but did not physically embrace.

Taking the stage after Biden, Harris said she was “mindful of all the ambitious women before me, whose sacrifice, determination and resilience makes my presence here today even possible.” She then launched into an attack on Trump, lambasting him for a lack of leadership on the coronavirus pandemic.

“This is a moment of real consequence for America. Everything we care about — our economy, our health, our children, the kind of country we live in — it’s all on the line,” she said.

WATCH | Harris attacks Donald Trump: 

Presumptive Democratic vice-presidential candidate Kamala Harris says the U.S. is reeling right now. 0:56

Trump told reporters later that he didn’t watch the full event, but saw moments of it. He went after Harris, saying she was “angry” and “mad” after her poor performance in the primaries. And he suggested her portrayal of his reaction to the pandemic was wrong. 

“She’s very bad around facts,” he said. “She’s very weak on facts.” And he expressed surprise again that Biden chose her as his running mate. 

“I think she’s going to be a big failure.”

In his own speech, Biden said it was no surprise that Trump went after Harris with insults. “You all knew it was coming,” he said. “You could have set your watches to it.”

WATCH | Biden goes after Trump’s insults:

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden says it was no surprise Donald Trump called Kamala Harris ‘nasty.’ 1:13

Harris speaks of Biden’s son

Biden and Harris showed clear affection toward one another, with Biden calling her an “honorary Biden” and Harris offering an emotional tribute to his son Beau, with whom she was friends when both served as attorneys general. Biden seemed overcome with emotion as Harris spoke of Beau, who died in 2015, as “the best of us” and a man who modelled himself after his father.

She signaled that she’ll offer a vigorous defence of Biden’s qualifications on issues of race and civil rights, though she made headlines for assailing him for his past opposition to federally mandated bussing during a primary debate last year.

Noting his own vice-presidency under President Barack Obama, she said Biden “takes his place in the ongoing story of America’s march toward equality and justice” as the only person “who’s served alongside the first Black president and has chosen the first Black woman as his running mate.”

The surreal nature of the scene was not only a woman of color stepping into the role that could carry her to the White House, but doing so in a mostly empty gym. Masked reporters nearly outnumbered campaign aides and the candidates’ families members in a grim reminder of a coronavirus pandemic that has killed 165,000 Americans, while yielding Depression-level unemployment and Second World War-level national deficits.

Republican criticism all over the map

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway on Wednesday insisted Harris is “very much part of the radical left” and suggested the senator will have a hard time not outshining Biden, whose age and fitness for office Conway frequently mocks. “He’s overshadowed basically by almost everyone he comes in contact with,” she said.

Biden’s campaign seemed prepared for the counteroffensive, noting that just weeks ago, Trump said Harris would be a “fine choice.” And campaign finance records show that Trump contributed as a private citizen to Harris’s attorney general campaigns in California. Harris was elected to the Senate in 2016.

LISTEN l Front Burner on the long-awaited selection:

On Tuesday, Joe Biden named California Senator Kamala Harris as his running mate, making history by choosing the first woman of colour to compete on a major party’s presidential ticket. Today on Front Burner, Washington Post political reporter Eugene Scott on what Harris brings to the Democratic Party’s ticket, and what it might mean for Biden’s chances against U.S President Donald Trump come November. 19:55

Further muddying the Republican message, Trump allies on Wednesday highlighted progressives’ criticism of Harris’s record as a prosecutor and California attorney general, essentially criticizing her as part of the Democratic establishment.

Indeed, Harris no longer supports a single-payer health insurance system, aligning instead with Biden’s proposal to add a public insurance option to compete alongside private plans. Still, Harris memorably raised her hand during one Democratic primary debate when candidates were asked whether they could back a system that scrapped private health insurance altogether.

She has broadly endorsed the Green New Deal, the progressives’ most ambitious set of proposals to combat the climate crisis, but she didn’t make that an anchor of her presidential bid. Biden has moved left on his climate proposals during the 2020 campaign but has not fully embraced the Green New Deal.

In Washington, Harris has advocated overhauling the criminal justice system, intensifying her efforts since George Floyd’s killing by a white Minneapolis officer in May. And she’s called for sweeping domestic programs to benefit the working and middle class. But she has taken heat for some of her aggressive stances as a local prosecutor in the San Francisco area and for not prosecuting bank executives in the wake of the 2008 financial collapse.

That mixed record could have unpredictable effects in a national campaign.

Biden bets that, on balance, Harris has broad appeal that will shore up any weaknesses with Black women, an anchor of the Democratic Party, and other voters of colour, while juicing turnout among white liberals and coaxing support from independents and Republican-leaning white voters who have soured on Trump.

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations

B.C. records 85 new coronavirus cases, its third-highest ever single-day total – Global News

August 12th, 2020

New coronavirus cases surged in British Columbia on Wednesday, with the province reporting the third-highest single-day total since the start of the pandemic.

Health officials reported 85 new cases of the virus, two of them epi-linked — the highest since April 25.

The majority of the new cases are young people in the Lower Mainland, with exposures at events in the community.

B.C. also recorded one death at Vancouver’s Holy Family Hospital long-term care home.

1:03B.C. officials report 85 new cases of COVID-19, one additional death

B.C. officials report 85 new cases of COVID-19, one additional death

More than 1,900 people are currently isolating due to potential exposures.

Story continues below advertisement

Eight people remain in hospital with COVID-19, five of them in critical care.

Of B.C.’s total 4,196 cases, 3,469 — about 82 per cent — have recovered.

The surge comes nearly two weeks after the B.C. Day Long Weekend and follows weeks of new cases trending over 40 per day. Officials said it also includes “a significant number of cases” linked to travel from out of province.

It pushes the number of active cases in the province from 472 on Tuesday to 531.

Read more: B.C. government to hire up to 500 additional contact tracers amid COVID-19 pandemic

The worsening numbers have renewed questions about whether B.C.’s approach to stopping transmission — which has relied on asking the public to follow guidelines, rather than ordering them — remains effective.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

Earlier Wednesday, Premier John Horgan said he continues to prefer the soft touch, though hinted the province could get tougher on those flouting existing regulations.

2:06Large social gatherings causing concern for health officials in BC

Large social gatherings causing concern for health officials in BC

“When it comes to things like private parties, people flouting the restriction on the number of faces in the smaller spaces … we’re going to be looking hard at enforcement when it comes to situations like that,” said Horgan.

Story continues below advertisement

“Those tools are available to us and they’re escalating, starting with warnings, of course, and then getting into more severe penalties. But we have been successful without taking a punitive approach to this pandemic, and we want to keep it that way.”

Read more: Coronavirus: Large social gatherings causing concern for B.C. health officials

Under B.C.’s Public Health Act, people caught breaking one of provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry’s health orders could face a fine of up to $25,000 and a jail term of up to six months.

Most of those orders remain focused on industry, however, a ban on gatherings of 50 or more people and restrictions on the number of visitors to vacation rental properties remain key areas where individuals could face enforcement.

Horgan and Henry also both reiterated support for wearing non-medical masks, Wednesday, while resisting making them mandatory.

“We don’t want people to believe that masks will be an invincibility shield for them,” said Horgan, saying physical distancing and hand hygiene remain the key to stopping the virus.

1:40Province considers stepping up COVID-19 enforcement

Province considers stepping up COVID-19 enforcement

Read more: B.C. students to return to the classroom by Sept. 10, a two-day delay to the start of school

Story continues below advertisement

“We’ve said from the very beginning personal protective equipment like masks in the community are the last line of defense and they should be worn when you can’t maintain those physical distances,” added Henry.

“We also need to remember that we need to be inclusive. There are reasons why people cannot wear masks, and we need to ensure that they can get the services and the care they need as well.”

Several new or expanded exposures were also announced on Wednesday.

New and expanded exposures

Levels Nightclub (560 Seymour St., Vancouver)

  • Aug. 4, 9 p.m. to 3 a.m.
  • Aug. 7, 9 p.m. to 3 a.m.

Harbour Dance Centre

  • Tuesday, Aug. 4, Advanced Choreography at 8:00 p.m. (studio #2)
  • Thursday, Aug. 6 Advanced Choreography at 1:45 p.m. (studio #2)
  • Friday, Aug. 7 Jazz Funk at 2:00 p.m. (studio #2)
  • Saturday, Aug. 8 Intro Hip hop at 12:45 p.m. (studio #4)

Foot Locker (919 Robson St., Vancouver)

  • Aug. 4
  • Aug. 5

Pierre’s Champagne Lounge (1028 Hamilton St., Vancouver)

  • July 31 to Aug. 8

West Oak Restaurant ( 1035 Mainland St., Vancouver)

  • July 31 to Aug. 8

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations

Biden, Harris lash Trump in introduction of historic VP pick – CTV News

August 12th, 2020

WILMINGTON, DEL. — Joe Biden and Kamala Harris delivered an aggressive one-two attack on the character and performance of U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday, as they made their election case for the first time as running mates.

Biden, a 77-year-old white man, embraced the significance of naming the first Black woman to a major party’s presidential ticket, but he also focused on other attributes Harris brings to the ticket. He hailed the California senator, the 55-year-old former prosecutor who a year ago excoriated Biden on a primary debate stage, as the right woman to help him defeat Trump and then lead a nation facing crises in triplicate: a pandemic, wounded economy and long-simmering reckoning with racism.

Harris, Biden declared at a high school gymnasium in his hometown of Wilmington, Delaware, is “smart, she’s tough, she’s experienced, she’s a proven fighter for the backbone of this country.”

“Kamala knows how to govern. She knows how to make the hard calls. She’s ready to do this job on day one,” he said.

Reflecting the coronavirus pandemic, both candidates came onstage wearing protective masks in a high school gym with relatively few in attendance, not in a hall filled with cheering supporters as would normally be the case. Both spoke without masks but did not physically embrace.

Biden praised her experience vigorously questioning Trump administration officials in the Senate, and highlighted the historic nature of her pick, noting she’s the daughter of immigrants from India and Jamaica.

“This morning, all across the nation, little girls woke up — especially little black and brown girls, who so often feel overlooked and undervalued in their communities. But today, today, just maybe, they’re seeing themselves for the first time in a new way,” Biden said.

Harris sat feet away from Biden, listening with her protective mask off.

Taking the stage after him, she flicked at some of the gender critiques she’d faced throughout the Democratic primary, saying she was “mindful of all the ambitious women before me, whose sacrifice, determination and resilience makes my presence here today even possible.” She then launched into an attack on Trump, lambasting him for a lack of leadership on the coronavirus pandemic.

“This is a moment of real consequence for America. Everything we care about — our economy, our health, our children, the kind of country we live in — it’s all on the line,” she said.

Biden and Harris showed clear affection toward one another, with Biden calling her an “honorary Biden” and Harris offering an emotional tribute to his son Beau, whom she was friends with when both served as attorneys general. Biden seemed overcome with emotion as Harris spoke of Beau, who died in 2015, as “the best of us” and a man who modeled himself after his father.

She signalled that she’ll offer a vigorous defence of Biden’s qualifications on issues of race and civil rights, though she made headlines for assailing him for his past opposition to federally mandated bussing during a primary debate last year.

Noting his own vice presidency under President Barack Obama, she said he “takes his place in the ongoing story of America’s march towards equality and justice” as the only person “who’s served alongside the first black president and has chosen the first black woman as his running mate.”

Historic or not, the event was not without its challenges. It started an hour late, and the high school gymnasium in which the candidates spoke lost its air conditioning after a power outage hit the area. While most of the cable news networks took the event live, the online livestream cut out just a few minutes into Biden’s remarks.

The surreal nature of the scene was not only a woman of colour stepping into the role that could carry her to the White House, but doing so in a mostly empty gym. Masked reporters nearly outnumbered campaign aides and the candidates’ families members in a grim reminder of a coronavirus pandemic that has killed 165,000 Americans, while yielding Depression-level unemployment and World War II-level national deficits.

In any other presidential election, vice-presidential picks are greeted with adoring throngs, and Harris, given her profile, almost certainly could have expected an even more enthusiastic welcome to the ticket. On Wednesday, about 100 supporters stood outside the gymnasium waving signs prior to her arrival, with no hopes of being allowed inside.

The event was the first in a rollout that Biden aides say blends the historic nature of Harris’ selection with the realities of the 2020 campaign and the gravity of the nation’s circumstances. Later Wednesday, the pair were leading an online grassroots fundraiser. They will continue campaigning together through the Democrats’ virtual convention that runs next Monday through Thursday.

Harris was considered a favourite throughout Biden’s search, and she’s been a regular surrogate campaigner and fundraiser for him since he became the presumptive nominee.

They’ll nonetheless have to paper over differences exposed during the primary campaign, from Harris’ initial support for a single-payer health insurance system and the Green New Deal to her deeply personal debate-stage broadside against Biden over his opposition to federally mandated busing to integrate public schools in the 1970s.

Trump has seized on those dynamics, tagging Harris as “Phony Kamala” and casting her as the latest evidence that Biden, a five-decade veteran of the Democratic establishment, is captive to his party’s left flank.

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway on Wednesday insisted Harris is “very much part of the radical left” and suggested the senator will have a hard time not outshining Biden, whose age and fitness for office Conway frequently mocks. “He’s overshadowed basically by almost everyone he comes in contact with,” she said.

Biden’s campaign seemed prepared for the counteroffensive, noting that just weeks ago, Trump said Harris would be a “fine choice.” And campaign finance records show that Trump contributed as a private citizen to Harris’ attorney general campaigns in California. Harris was elected to the Senate in 2016.

Harris no longer supports a single-payer health insurance system, aligning instead with Biden’s proposal to add a public insurance option to compete alongside private plans. Still, Harris memorably raised her hand during one Democratic primary debate when candidates were asked whether they could back a system that scrapped private health insurance altogether.

She has broadly endorsed the Green New Deal, progressives’ most ambitious set of proposals to combat the climate crisis, but she didn’t make that an anchor of her presidential bid. Biden has moved left on his climate proposals during the 2020 campaign but has not fully embraced the Green New Deal.

In Washington, Harris has advocated overhauling the criminal justice system, intensifying her efforts since George Floyd’s killing by a white Minneapolis officer in May. And she’s called for sweeping domestic programs to benefit the working and middle class. But she has taken heat for some of her aggressive stances as a local prosecutor in the San Francisco area and for not prosecuting bank executives in the wake of the 2008 financial collapse.

That mixed record could have unpredictable effects in a national campaign.

Biden bets that, on balance, Harris has broad appeal that will shore up any weaknesses with Black women, an anchor of the Democratic Party, and other voters of colour, while juicing turnout among white liberals and coaxing support from independents and Republican-leaning white voters who have soured on Trump.

Karen Finney, a prominent Black strategist in the Democratic Party, pointed to immediate fundraising success as evidence that Biden’s take on Harris is better than Trump’s. Act Blue, Democrats’ online fundraising arm, reported taking in almost $11 million in the hours after Biden’s announcement, and the Biden campaign expected a massive haul from Wednesday evening’s fundraiser, potentially rivaling previous events with Obama and former 2020 rival Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

“We won’t get the visual,” Finney said, referring to the realities of a coronavirus-era campaign. “But you can already feel the energy and excitement.”

——

Barrow reported from Atlanta. Associated Press reporter Aamer Madhani contributed from Washington.

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations

Downtown Vancouver’s St. Paul’s Hospital site sells for close to $1B – CBC.ca

August 12th, 2020

The private non-profit that owns the site of Vancouver’s St. Paul’s Hospital says it has been sold for nearly $1 billion.

Providence Health Care announced Wednesday in a news release the sale of its property at 1081 Burrard Street to Concord Pacific.

It states all proceeds from the sale will go toward health care and a new hospital at the Jim Pattison Medical Centre near Trillium Park that will replace the downtown centrepiece.

“This investment represents the largest non-governmental contribution to a capital health-care project in B.C., and likely, Canada,” Providence Health Care said in its statement.

The buyer is an urban developer with head offices based in Vancouver.

“The current St. Paul’s Hospital site is an extraordinary opportunity and will be the most exciting project in the history of downtown Vancouver,” Peter Webb, senior vice-president of Concord Pacific, said in the statement.

“We also look forward to working with Providence Health Care, the Province of B.C., MST Development Corporation and the City of Vancouver to achieve the best development plan and most impactful financial outcome towards the delivery of the new St. Paul’s Hospital,” reads the statement.

Announced in 2002, Minister of Health Adrian Dix said in a daily COVID-19 briefing on Wednesday, the goal is to have it ready for 2026.

“The project is on track and moving forward,” he said.

The future home of St. Paul’s Hospital at 1002 Station St., just east of Main Street and Pacific Central Station in Vancouver, B.C. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

St. Paul’s Hospital will continue to operate downtown for the next several years, until the new location at 1002 Station St. is open and fully operational, according to the statement.

In the release, Fiona Dalton, president and CEO of Providence Health Care, said the next step for this fall is to select a company to design and build the hospital.

“The compassionate care used to treat the people and their families who use St. Paul’s Hospital will not change or alter in any way,” she said.

A rendering of the proposed redevelopment of St. Paul’s Hospital on False Creek Flats in East Vancouver. (Providence Health Care)

The president of the St. Paul’s Foundation said they are on track to meet their fundraising goal for the first phase of the project, which aims to raise $125 million for the new hospital, plus another $100 million for ongoing and future needs.

The release states the province is spending $1.158 billion and the remainder of the money will come from the sale of the Burrard Street site.

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations

‘I’m sick, I need a doctor,’ man charged in murder of Red Deer doctor tells court – CBC.ca

August 12th, 2020

A man charged with killing a Red Deer doctor at a walk-in clinic told a judge Wednesday he is ill and doesn’t recall details about the attack.

Deng Mabiour spoke to the court by telephone from his cell at the Red Deer Remand Centre, where he is being held in quarantine due to the pandemic. 

The court clerk read the charges and Judge W. Albert Skinner asked Mabiour if he understood them. 

“I don’t remember everything in detail,” he said. “When I get healthy I will remember everything.” 

Pressed by the judge, Mabiour said, “I didn’t remember everything because I’m sick. I need a doctor.” 

He then laughed. 

The matter was adjourned briefly to allow a defence lawyer to speak to Mabiour. 

When Mabiour was back on the phone, the judge told him, “You have to understand what you are charged with.” 

Again the man repeated that he didn’t understand because he is sick. 

Skinner advised him to contact legal aid to obtain a lawyer before his next court appearance on Sept. 9.

Dr. Walter Reynolds, 45, was attacked with a hammer and a machete on Monday morning inside the Village Mall Walk-in Clinic. He died later in hospital. 

Mabiour, 54, was arrested at the scene and has been charged with first-degree murder, assault with a weapon and assaulting a police officer.

He has no known criminal record. 

Targeted and premeditated attack

RCMP have described the attack as targeted and premeditated.

Mabiour and Reynolds knew each other through the clinic, Supt. Gerald Grobmeier, commander of the Red Deer RCMP detachment, said during a news conference Tuesday.

“The individual went in with a goal, and so it wasn’t a random attack,” Grobmeier said. “The individual went into the clinic for that purpose.

“In 27 years of policing, I’ve never seen a doctor attacked like that.”

Deng Mabiour has been charged with first-degree murder, assault with a weapon and assault. (Facebook)

Deng Wil Luol Deng, who lives in South Sudan but knows Mabiour from the South Sudanese community in Red Deer, said he is shocked by the allegations.

“I am very sorry and very sad about what happened,” he said in a Facebook message to The Canadian Press.

“We still don’t know why.”

‘The best colleague I ever had’

The doctor is being remembered as a kind practitioner, a devoted dad and a jokester.

Reynolds was “the best colleague I ever had,” Dr. Edward Ohanjanians said Tuesday.

Ohanjanians said Reynolds was a founder of the Village Mall Walk-in Clinic where they both worked. Reynolds took care of all the clinic’s shopping and scheduling.

The clinic, sandwiched in between a hair salon and a dollar store, remained cordoned off with yellow police tape.

Ohanjanians said he was at the clinic when Reynolds was attacked Monday morning. He was unable to talk about what happened.

“I witnessed the tragic death of my colleague and friend,” he said. “It’s a difficult time.”

He was just a wonderful doctor who was so good to us.– Cecillia Ferris

There was a growing display of flowers and cards outside the clinic Tuesday. A medical face mask was tied to a lamp post among the bouquets.

Kristen York placed a smiling photo of Reynolds at the site. She said she snapped the picture before leaving her job at the clinic about a month ago.

“I took pictures of all the doctors and it was just to put on our TV screen so everybody could see which doctor was which,” York said while brushing away tears.

“He was the most kind, loving person ever. He was a jokester. We always joked around. He was just very, very kind.”

Cecilia and John Ferris were patients of Dr. Walter Reynolds for 15 years. (Travis McEwan/CBC)

Cecilia Ferris and her husband John had been his patients for nearly 15 years and paid their respects at the makeshift memorial. 

The doctor spoke often of his family and cared deeply about his patients, she said. 

“He was just a wonderful doctor who was so good to us,” she said.

“It’s going to be a loss and I just can’t believe, I can’t believe the traumatic way he passed away.”  

Dr. Peter Bouch, who works at another Red Deer clinic, said he and Reynolds were both part of a tight-knit community of doctors in the city who are originally from South Africa.

“He was always talking about his daughters,” Bouch said. “He’s always been very proud of his family and also proud of his medical practice and his patients.”

Bouch said he has been in Canada for 26 years, Reynolds for less than that.

On its website, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta lists Reynolds as being registered to work in the province starting in 2006.

“Hearing about the loss of an Alberta physician under such shocking circumstances is devastating,” the college’s registrar, Dr. Scott McLeod, said in a statement.

“It’s difficult to understand how or why such a tragedy could occur, especially in a care space and to someone who dedicated their life to helping others.”

A memorial of flowers, balloons and stuffed animals was growing on Wednesday outside the Red Deer. Alta., walk-in clinic where Dr. Walter Reynolds was fatally attacked. (Travis McEwan/CBC)

Android, Apache, bioinformatics, bitcoin mining, computers, Employment, ethereum mining, Linux, Marketing, Microsoft, skype, smartphone, software, tablet, TV, Video, visualizations